Palms in Lubbock, TX (7a)

12 posts in this topic

I moved from Canada to Lubbock a few years ago. I've seen a few Trachys around the city; they do fine without protection (got down to 5 in December), but they look horrible due to wind. From what I've read about palms in Albuquerque, I would have expected to see a few more varieties in Lubbock. I've heard that there's some Filiferas around here, but I have no idea how to find them. I know it's a long shot, but have any of you ever heard of/seen palms in Lubbock? I'd love if someone could put me in touch with another grower in my area.

I'm growing some Filifera, Waggy, and Sabal Palmetto seedlings now, and would like to find a local person that had success with palms.... I know that with enough protection I could keep a palm alive in Antarctica, and I'm willing to protect them for a few years, but I'd rather give up now if they'll never be self-sufficient; I'm not about to build styrofoam outhouses for palm trees!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it is a true 7a climate there you would be pushing the limits for those species. We have a few members here from even more extreme climates than yours and they could give you even better advice. If you type in the words "cold hardy" in the forums search.....make sure it is forums and not this topic....you should get a lot of info including collectors and growers in your area. There are some S. palmetto varieties that are more cold hardy and would probably work. Also Nannorohps richina 《~ spelled wrong) and needles and Sabal minors would probably work as well. If you are going for a tropical look you can use a few of these cold hardy species mix in some yucca's and tropical looking dicots water falls etc. And achieve a pretty good look.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of the other Trachy's are more wind tolorant as well.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I'm aware of several other varieties that could handle the climate, but availability is a major issue, and that's why I grow from seed. As much as I'd like a Sabal Birmingham or Brazoria, I can't wait a decade for a trunk to start forming. The Filifera is great for that since it grows super fast. I'm not sure what exactly constitutes a "true" 7a climate, but I know that my zip code was recently reclassified from a zone 7b to 7a, and we're right on the border now. If I drive 45 minutes south, I find unprotected Filiferas with 7' of clear trunk; and again, people are having success in Albuquerque, which has very similar cold & precipitation to Lubbock, and is also 7a.

Sorry if this looks like the common "tell me I'm not crazy for trying palms here" thread; I'm really just trying to find others that have had success in a similar climate. I'm a realist.

I heard that someone in my town ordered 14 huge Filiferas last fall, but damned if I can find him to see how they handled the NASTY winter. Whoever it was either was very certain that they'd survive, or had the money take a crazy gamble.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are some great palm society chapters in Texas, just spent some time on one a few weeks ago looking thru their meeting photos, but they are primarily in southern Texas, although contacting one closer to you might be helpful. If my memory of geography serves me, isn't Lubbock located in northwestern Texas on top of a plateau sort of (thinking higher, drier and more windy than parts east)?

I heard the Best Western Palm Hotel and Suites in Lubbock had palms but think they might be large artificial ones....

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

post-97-0-47312600-1401394692_thumb.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would plant big Sabal palmetto's, they are $150 per tree up to 20 ft. clear trunk here..you would probably have to drive down state to purchase......and might even try some Mules or other Butia hybrids.

South side of the house and under some tall canopy tree's if possible.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours south of you in San Angelo there is a guy who sells palms I don't remember his name or the name of his nursery but he had a slug of them when I drove through there last year

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you thinking of Mjff? He's another user on this site. From what he's posted on here, he appears to have a pretty amazing collection. There's a significant difference in climate between Lubbock and San Angelo since Lubbock is further north and has a higher elevation.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

not sure maybe? we didnt really spend a lot of time because we were behind schedule

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Based on my findings, Sabal palmettos in Texas tend to be very expensive. I called a nursery north of Houston, their prices were $100 per foot.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now