ZONE 8 AND 9 CANOPY TREES

212 posts in this topic

The Photina seratifolia is not that pretty but its growing well....debating digging it out and giving to a friend. Think I would rather put another citrus in its place

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24 minutes ago, Alicehunter2000 said:

They bother survived but we're not growing much. Gave Montezuma to my brother who has acreage north of me in the country 8b... he can plant near a pond.

The Acer fabri was traded to someone for some nice bromiliads/cactus

Gotchya. I working on a plant list for not only some canopy options but just small evergreen trees for winter color. Does the Montezuma stay evergreen for your brother, it looks like it will loose it's needles in the cooler portions of it's range, 

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I think it drops them around 25 degrees. They love a lot of water but will tolerate dry....just won't grow much. 

The little Japanese Blueberry is pretty cool ....reminds me a bit of Cleyera which is even more cold hardy ... mine is nothe Christmas tree shaped....hate that anyway...except for Christmas

I really like the look of grapefruit trees ...get pretty big and have few thorns. 

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On 11/30/2018, 9:52:33, Alicehunter2000 said:

Wow looking back at this old thread I can't believe how many things I've tried that failed. The only winners have been Nagai nagi, Photina serratifolia, Jap. blueberry tree, summer chocolate mimosa, sweetbay magnolia, golden raintree, grapefruit tree, loquat trees. 

Nagei nagi and the Japanese Blueberry tree are high on my list for growing up there in a tropical looking landscape. Also, do you still have your Phytolacca dioica?

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2 hours ago, Opal92 said:

Nagei nagi and the Japanese Blueberry tree are high on my list for growing up there in a tropical looking landscape. Also, do you still have your Phytolacca dioica?

It got about 20 ft. this year....very top heavy so cut it down to about 5ft. for the winter. 

20180923_100915.jpg

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3 minutes ago, Alicehunter2000 said:

It got about 20 ft. this year....very top heavy so cut it down to about 5ft. for the winter. 

Very cool! at what temps does it start taking cold damage?

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Probably around 25....I dies back to the main trunk and would probably have melted down to 5 ft. anyway. The great thing about them is that they just get more character when they resume growth....I hope it get multiple trunks this spring from the stump

 

Here is the nagi .... it is a slow grower and wants to be a bush

20180907_080921.jpg

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Nice ombu! Where did you get it? I have been looking for one for several years. 

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9 hours ago, Alicehunter2000 said:

Probably around 25....I dies back to the main trunk and would probably have melted down to 5 ft. anyway. The great thing about them is that they just get more character when they resume growth....I hope it get multiple trunks this spring from the stump

 

Here is the nagi .... it is a slow grower and wants to be a bush

Hmm it appears to be more cold tender than I original hoped- probably not hardy enough to appreciably grow on the mainland up there. Still would maybe experiment with it though. Surprised I haven't seen any here in Central FL.

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The ombu gets hardier with girth. ..and looks better IMO ... when it doesn't die back it just gets taller without much increase in base diameter....it's heavy and full of spongy watery tissue so when it gets tall it wants to fall over. I like them when they take on more of a ponytail plant shape (which they remind me of trunk wise). In warm weather they grow very quickly ... similar to an angels trumpet....maybe not quite that fast.

I got mine years ago from Jerry@tree zoo .... who is a member on here...yes they are very hard to find. I have been unsuccessful in propegating from cuttings even though they say it can be done....I just suck at it

 

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I think another good candidate for a zone 8/9 canopy tree is Radermachera sinica (China Doll Tree). From what I can find online it seems to have a good bit of hardiness. I saw comments on Dave's Garden of someone in Houston who's tree survived the 8b/9a temps in 2010 with just leaf drop. Also on DG there's a comment saying there's a large one successfully growing in Tallahassee. However this site says that upper teens can kill small plants to the ground. Still probably worth a try in these zones (probably more the 9a end). I'd like to experiment more with them. They have a nice exotic look (are actually in the same family as trumpet trees/handroanthus, jacaranda, and tecoma). I have seen them occasionally sold at big box stores as a house plant- however, when they are sold like this, there are many stems in one pot, so getting a leader might be difficult. Does anyone else have experience with these?

Radermachera_sinica__Canton_Lace-004.JPG

Radermachera-sinica-China-Doll-Emerald-T

 

Edited by Opal92
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China doll would be cool....didn't think they were that hardy. 

I have variegated China berry ....they are nice looking cold hardy trees. A bit invasive though.

 

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