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Serenoa repens (silver)

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Here is a couple of pics from my neighborhood. You can really appreciate the difference in both color and size of the leaf from the common green form. The silver form is not native to this part of Florida but it is fairly common in landscaped areaspost-97-0-41858500-1382835226_thumb.jpgpost-97-0-28211700-1382835404_thumb.jpgpost-97-0-65666500-1382835498_thumb.jpg

post-97-0-93312200-1382835335_thumb.jpg

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Great plants! Love the contrasts

:greenthumb:

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Nice. Is that your bike?

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That's such a beautiful color, David....do you have some time for a little bit off-topic moment? Michael and I have been considering one, maybe for a strategic placement in our backyard garden area. This last spring, Joe Alf mentioned a white form. Well, I just had no idea that there were different forms. So I hopped onto the internet and found what the white form looks like <---(photo credit, Dave Witt's website), Awesome! (And speaking of awesome, your Beach Party threads are more than awesome, they're crazy amazing and highly educational, both 1 & 2.) So, while surfing to see a white form, I found out there are also "blue forms," which they seem to resemble the pictures of the silver in your post one, or is it considered more a white form? Arg. Maybe it's just what a silver is supposed to look like? lol. Just guessing that these white and blue forms are varieties found within the silver form? IDK. And to add to my confusion, I found names used such as cinerea also associated with silver. The point of all this chitter chatter is just my weird way of saying that the more I look, the more I am falling in love with Serenoa repens. ---And one more thing: although I'm having trouble trying to re-find it-----there is a photo floating somewhere around the internet of a well grown saw palmetto that is so incredibly nice. Its picture was with a natives landscaping article, I think. Anyway, that's what made my husband say, "Yeah I want that!" I think he's gonna like the beautiful color in your photo even better! :greenthumb::lol:

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I put a seedling in the garden this year. Will all of the humidity, rain,and cloudiness it is now quite green. I hope as it ages and our weather returns to normal, I might see at least some silverish tint in the future.

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Shirley, you live in the land of white/silver/blue Serenoa repens. From Melborne Beach to Sebastian Inlet on Merritt Island there are hundreds of thousands of this form. Your biggest challenge will be finding one in a pot to plant. If you get seed, find the best plant possible. It might be possible to dig a plant, but it is very difficult. From what I understand S. repens sends roots down very deep and if the roots get cut, the plant dies. There was a thread several years ago discussing transplanting this species. I am curious, there are no naturally occurring silver S. repens in your yard?

Keith, that's my Target special bicycle....the seat is about to come off....wanna get me one of those gel padded seats. As you know there are tons of places to ride around here. When you and your wife come over we can take a bicycle tour and pick S. repens (silver) seeds to our hearts content.

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That's such a beautiful color, David....do you have some time for a little bit off-topic moment? Michael and I have been considering one, maybe for a strategic placement in our backyard garden area. This last spring, Joe Alf mentioned a white form. Well, I just had no idea that there were different forms. So I hopped onto the internet and found what the white form looks like <---(photo credit, Dave Witt's website), Awesome! (And speaking of awesome, your Beach Party threads are more than awesome, they're crazy amazing and highly educational, both 1 & 2.) So, while surfing to see a white form, I found out there are also "blue forms," which they seem to resemble the pictures of the silver in your post one, or is it considered more a white form? Arg. Maybe it's just what a silver is supposed to look like? lol. Just guessing that these white and blue forms are varieties found within the silver form? IDK. And to add to my confusion, I found names used such as cinerea also associated with silver. The point of all this chitter chatter is just my weird way of saying that the more I look, the more I am falling in love with Serenoa repens. ---And one more thing: although I'm having trouble trying to re-find it-----there is a photo floating somewhere around the internet of a well grown saw palmetto that is so incredibly nice. Its picture was with a natives landscaping article, I think. Anyway, that's what made my husband say, "Yeah I want that!" I think he's gonna like the beautiful color in your photo even better! :greenthumb::lol:

I'm sure several nurseries in your area sell these. You just have to select the plants that have the best color. I buy from a couple of wholesale nurseries up here and they pull the plants for you but I always insist on selecting these on my own. Usually the folks pulling the plants for the nursery just look for size and health and aren't really concerned about color. Additionally, the "whitest" serenoas are often the smallest.

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You guys are the best! I can't thank you enough for sharing your knowledge. David, you're right about the various silvery-ish, blue-ish, white-ish forms growing around here---especially during tracking with our dogs, I've noticed. But it's only due to coming to the school of PalmTalk that I'm learning identification of what I'm noticing. It makes me wonder how many times did I absentmindedly pull "weeds" that I thought were little queens, or something palmy, but were really baby Serenoa repens! lol. I remember reading the thread you referenced (I think this is it? Pretty sure there was another but can't find it), and I am way too novice and super chicken to dig anything wild crafted! Slowly but Shirley (hee!)---I learn so much here. And when I come across the seed while out and about, I'll photograph it for your opinions, first.

Jason thanks for pointing out those rare diamond-like little nuances. I do hope to find one like the one I saw at Dave Witt's! His is very pretty.

Hey, just for the fun of it, I'd like to add, we're bikers, too---want to see our chariot of fur?

The seat is set for my size, notice how Michael's

legs knock the gear as they come in for landing:

Flyingfur.jpg

In this one, Keek and Cris are laughing about how

the fur was flying:

Chariotoffurs.jpg

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I planted these as very small palms about a year ago and thought they were Euro Fans. I am now wondering if these are Serenoa?

IMG_20131028_083725_134_zps7a00a199.jpg

IMG_20131028_083741_707_zpsf3964906.jpg

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This one in my yard is what I also had labelled as Euro Fan.......but the leaves are much much stiffer and more "silvery".

IMG_20131027_125644_870_zpsa83b4516.jpg

Edited by spockvr6
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This one in my yard is what I also had labelled as Euro Fan.......but the leaves are much much stiffer and more "silvery".

IMG_20131027_125644_870_zpsa83b4516.jpg

It is indeed Euro Fan

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I planted these as very small palms about a year ago and thought they were Euro Fans. I am now wondering if these are Serenoa?

IMG_20131028_083725_134_zps7a00a199.jpg

IMG_20131028_083741_707_zpsf3964906.jpg

It is ideed a Sabal serrulata!

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I planted these as very small palms about a year ago and thought they were Euro Fans. I am now wondering if these are Serenoa?

IMG_20131028_083725_134_zps7a00a199.jpg

IMG_20131028_083741_707_zpsf3964906.jpg

It is ideed a Sabal serrulata!

People still use that name instead of Serenoa repens?

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Rats! So....Sabal serrulata / Serenoa repens it is!?!?!?? If so....I have made a major mistake in the location they are planted!

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For plants this size......can they be transplanted easily?

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For plants this size......can they be transplanted easily?

If it has only been in the ground for a year I'd say you're pretty safe in moving it.

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I planted these as very small palms about a year ago and thought they were Euro Fans. I am now wondering if these are Serenoa?

IMG_20131028_083725_134_zps7a00a199.jpg

IMG_20131028_083741_707_zpsf3964906.jpg

It is ideed a Sabal serrulata!

People still use that name instead of Serenoa repens?

Mostly in medicine!

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Took a look at mine today. They are full of fungus from our crazy rainy year. I don't have much faith they will make it.

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I'm enjoying my latest palm purchase, now planted in a prominent location on my backyard berm... a silver Serenoa repens (from https://texascoldhardypalms.com/ ). It practically glows in the moonlight! ;)

SilverSerenoa_repens.jpg

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On 10/5/2017, 2:23:21, Hillizard said:

I'm enjoying my latest palm purchase, now planted in a prominent location on my backyard berm... a silver Serenoa repens (from https://texascoldhardypalms.com/ ). It practically glows in the moonlight! ;)

SilverSerenoa_repens.jpg

Nice!!

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