trachycarpus princeps bud rot

17 posts in this topic

Anyone else having this problem with trachycarpus princeps bud rot. I’m totally stump why this happen.

DSC00020_zpsf6be8115.jpg

Here’s what a nice one looks like when kept dry, notice how silver the top of the leaves are.

DSC00018_zpsc79e121c.jpg

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Sorry to hear that. The fungus could be Winter cold stress related. I see fungus issues on both specimens in your pictures, even the one you say is dry. Maybe these are only as hardy as t. martianus. There are mixed results with other people too, some have succeeded, some have failed in colder climates with these. See http://www.growingontheedge.net/viewtopic.php?p=59233.

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They hate water!

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They hate water!

In their native habitat, they are limestone cliff dwellers. There's plenty of rainfall there, but super fast drainage as well. They like full sun to part shade and probably do not tolerate full shade. If your soil is too acidic, it might make them more fungus prone. The California live oak succumbs to sudden oak death when the soil acidity goes up. I think this palm may behave the same way. Try feeding your palm dolomite lime and azomite. That's what I give mine and they love it.

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Thanks Axel and yachtingone,

Acid soil is what I have and I did (ightly) apply some Azomite a few weeks ago, but probaby not enough since this is my first time using the rock dust.

I also wonder if its getting to much irrigation from sprayers during the spring. That’s easy to fix, but to much rain nothing I can do expect move it to a dryer sunnier spot this weekend or next spring. Another one I have in the ground receives less sun and less rain is totally fine.

Have notice they grow faster in full sun than half a day of shade. So maybe moving it would be good idea.

I cut off the damage leaf, stem is ok. Low last winter was 25F/-3.8C.

Thanks for the link.

Edited by Palm crazy
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Here’s an update of the palm, looks like it will be ok after all, making a full recovery after winter. I thought for sure it was not going to make it but it has…..very happy.

DSC00005_zps01c00835.jpg

New growth looks good and solid. I have one more to plant this spring still in a pot.

DSC00002_zpsce6f5a62.jpg

Edited by Palm crazy
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Congrats, that's real good news!

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They must be amazingly drought tolerant,. I had a group of mixed palms in one gallon pots years ago and they went without water one summer when I was gone for 2 1/2 weeks. When I returned, the T princeps were the only ones that survived! I'd bet they can hang on to those cliffs with the smallest amount of soil and water.

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It's interesting, mine look very different than the one pictured above. They are blue on top with white leaf margins and silver on the bottom. They definitely have the signature of a desert/drought tolerant palm.

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It's interesting, mine look very different than the one pictured above. They are blue on top with white leaf margins and silver on the bottom. They definitely have the signature of a desert/drought tolerant palm.

Mine have lots of silver on the bottom, and only the one in the greenhouse where its dryer, has silver on top of the leaves. Maybe the rain or high humidity removes the top sliver, or cold? You can see the difference in my first posting.

Got mine from South Coast Palms.

Edited by Palm crazy
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Mine all started out looking exactly like the blue one in post one...then just after a few months in the ground turn a lighter green-losing the blue on top. The white backs remain.

I think what Axel said about getting plenty of water in optimal habitat conditions sounds right- its just that they drain very quickly. Also, I think their wet season is summer, so heavy winter rains do not sound like a good thing at all especially if they are not in optimal drainage.

I'm going to pot up a one gallon plant into a five with a pumice heavy cycad mix and see what happens.

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Sometimes if the bud is stuck in cold damp weather and is not growing you see this...

really any palm can rot if there is moisture and the bud is not moving.

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Nice palm!

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Mine all started out looking exactly like the blue one in post one...then just after a few months in the ground turn a lighter green-losing the blue on top. The white backs remain.

I think what Axel said about getting plenty of water in optimal habitat conditions sounds right- its just that they drain very quickly. Also, I think their wet season is summer, so heavy winter rains do not sound like a good thing at all especially if they are not in optimal drainage.

I'm going to pot up a one gallon plant into a five with a pumice heavy cycad mix and see what happens.

I think it is not litterally a bud rot the problem but rather initially a rot underneath the stem's base. Otherwise I agree fully that the key to prevention is a very fast draining medium, which withholds until next watering only little moisture.

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Mine all started out looking exactly like the blue one in post one...then just after a few months in the ground turn a lighter green-losing the blue on top. The white backs remain.

I think what Axel said about getting plenty of water in optimal habitat conditions sounds right- its just that they drain very quickly. Also, I think their wet season is summer, so heavy winter rains do not sound like a good thing at all especially if they are not in optimal drainage.

I'm going to pot up a one gallon plant into a five with a pumice heavy cycad mix and see what happens.

My native soil is sandy loam so pretty good drainage, have to with 50" of rain.

Sometimes if the bud is stuck in cold damp weather and is not growing you see this...

really any palm can rot if there is moisture and the bud is not moving.

Thats what I think happened here, Jim.

Mine all started out looking exactly like the blue one in post one...then just after a few months in the ground turn a lighter green-losing the blue on top. The white backs remain.

I think what Axel said about getting plenty of water in optimal habitat conditions sounds right- its just that they drain very quickly. Also, I think their wet season is summer, so heavy winter rains do not sound like a good thing at all especially if they are not in optimal drainage.

I'm going to pot up a one gallon plant into a five with a pumice heavy cycad mix and see what happens.

I think it is not litterally a bud rot the problem but rather initially a rot underneath the stem's base. Otherwise I agree fully that the key to prevention is a very fast draining medium, which withholds until next watering only little moisture.

I don't think thats the same case here, since there was no stem lost, only top of the new growth coming out. The one leaf that was damaged still has a good stem base and that is growing out along with two slightly damage leaves. I'll try and get some updated photos tomorrow. But, what you said DID happen on a few other palms.

Edited by Palm crazy
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Nice palm!

Thanks Limonclk.

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Ok, I spoke to soon, after looking I did see a dead base leaf at the top were the new grow is growing. So Phoeninkakias you could be Right also. LOL!

Here two up dated photos taken today at different time.

DSC00107_zpsff8d90e0.jpg

DSC00120_zps596db7bc.jpg

My two other Princeps. Taken earlier today before the rain, its sunny again now.

DSC00110_zpsde3cc0b9.jpg

Planted under neath a holly tree so somewhat dryer spot.

DSC00114_zps84ca421b.jpg

Edited by Palm crazy
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