Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Moving...Need to transplant

37 posts in this topic

I will be moving in the upcoming weeks. I am going to take as many palms with me as I can. What is your experience with digging up and transplanting any of the following?

1. Jubaea--oldest approximately 10 years old
2. Brahea Clara--trunk about 1.5 ft tall
3. Brahea decumbens -- older specimen
4. Trithrinax campestris --creeping along the ground
5. Washy filifera. -trunk about 1.5ft
6. Jub x butia x queen --trunk about 1ft tall and thick. leaves now reach 6ft
7. Nannorhops -- many heads
8. Trachycarpus "naga hills" --skinny trunk about 1 ft tall
9. Sabal domingensis --just starting to get a fat trunk
10. Other sabals---is it fruitless?

Will any of these survive transplant? Secrets?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow-this might be a tricky time to do it if we get hit with some really cold weather-but the good news is that I don't think that the ground will be freezing anytime soon. Which is good because if it were me, I would go outside today/tomorrow and cut the roots all the way around all the palms that you want to take with you. Cut the largest circle that you can reasonably dig up (later) so that at least some of the roots are cut now. That or just wait and dig them up when you go. I am really not sure that it would make a difference to cut some of the roots now as the palms are most likely not doing any growing right now as the weather is not warm enough. It might be 6 of this, half dozen of that kind of situation. As you can see, I am kind of just talking this out as I write. If you do go out and cut the roots around the palms, I would definitely cover the ground extra good with mulch to keep the roots warmer. I think its a crapshoot either way-you could cut the roots and then we get really bad cold weather or not.

When you say upcoming weeks-what does that mean? Late Jan, sometime in Feb? Could it wait until sometime in March? The warmer, the better. Are you moving to a colder place or warmer or just east/west?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I will be moving in the upcoming weeks. I am going to take as many palms with me as I can. What is your experience with digging up and transplanting any of the following?

1. Jubaea--oldest approximately 10 years old

2. Brahea Clara--trunk about 1.5 ft tall

3. Brahea decumbens -- older specimen

4. Trithrinax campestris --creeping along the ground

5. Washy filifera. -trunk about 1.5ft

6. Jub x butia x queen --trunk about 1ft tall and thick. leaves now reach 6ft

7. Nannorhops -- many heads

8. Trachycarpus "naga hills" --skinny trunk about 1 ft tall

9. Sabal domingensis --just starting to get a fat trunk

10. Other sabals---is it fruitless?

Will any of these survive transplant? Secrets?

Pray !

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow-this might be a tricky time to do it if we get hit with some really cold weather-but the good news is that I don't think that the ground will be freezing anytime soon. Which is good because if it were me, I would go outside today/tomorrow and cut the roots all the way around all the palms that you want to take with you. Cut the largest circle that you can reasonably dig up (later) so that at least some of the roots are cut now. That or just wait and dig them up when you go. I am really not sure that it would make a difference to cut some of the roots now as the palms are most likely not doing any growing right now as the weather is not warm enough. It might be 6 of this, half dozen of that kind of situation. As you can see, I am kind of just talking this out as I write. If you do go out and cut the roots around the palms, I would definitely cover the ground extra good with mulch to keep the roots warmer. I think its a crapshoot either way-you could cut the roots and then we get really bad cold weather or not.

When you say upcoming weeks-what does that mean? Late Jan, sometime in Feb? Could it wait until sometime in March? The warmer, the better. Are you moving to a colder place or warmer or just east/west?

I will wait til April to start digging. I am in no hurry to sell my existing place, but we will be moving into the new place in March...about 30 miles away. Thanks for the thoughts. I am trying to figure out what I should just leave at the old place.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"10. Other sabals---is it fruitless"

I can't comment on you others but sabels seem to transplant easily. From what I see in m y parts, they cut off ALL OF THE FRONDS leaving just the emerging spear. They leave very little root ball and prop then up with 2x4's. The only issue I know of is wet sables like to go to wet places and dry ones to dry places. Other then that they are easy. Good luck on the move.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Small sabals, however, can be difficult....if it has no trunk. I would dig around the plants now as kahili mentioned and put lots of mulch in the trenched area. You could do this in a couple of steps, first one side and then the other. Ken Johnson can give you the best advice on how to successfully root prune for transplant...he has done hundreds (if not more) on all different species and sizes. I would shoot him a p.m.....sounds like you have some cool stuff up there, would hate for you to lose any of them.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The problem with this situation that Cindy has is the very real possibility of two different "shock" scenarios coming together-which kind of makes it interesting. But also could be the lethal straw that broke the chance of successful transplanting endeavor. You have the "cold shock" that could come about if we get some seriously cold weather in the next few months which most likely will happen, and then the "root shook" that will happen (or maybe not because of the cold weather shutting down root development) if she cuts the roots now. When you normally cut roots in order to transplant in a later time, cold weather is usually not part of the concern. Here is it-which is what I think is interesting! (Sorry Cindy-I know you just want a successful transplant of your palms).

If it were me, knowing that you can wait, I would start to dig around all of the palm mid-March (give or take a week or so after looking at the 10 day weather report) and then make the move mid April. As to whether some will transplant better than others, I would go for them all with as big a root ball as possible, and maybe waiting a few more wks in April to move the trickier ones. You have nothing to lose by not trying them all. Chances are that whoever you sell to could think that they were ugly, or just in the way of their garden plans and cut them down. Good luck! I hope they all make it, and let us know how it goes as I sure am interested to know!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"10. Other sabals---is it fruitless"

I can't comment on you others but sabels seem to transplant easily. From what I see in m y parts, they cut off ALL OF THE FRONDS leaving just the emerging spear. They leave very little root ball and prop then up with 2x4's. The only issue I know of is wet sables like to go to wet places and dry ones to dry places. Other then that they are easy. Good luck on the move.

Thanks Redant. I will need luck

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Small sabals, however, can be difficult....if it has no trunk. I would dig around the plants now as kahili mentioned and put lots of mulch in the trenched area. You could do this in a couple of steps, first one side and then the other. Ken Johnson can give you the best advice on how to successfully root prune for transplant...he has done hundreds (if not more) on all different species and sizes. I would shoot him a p.m.....sounds like you have some cool stuff up there, would hate for you to lose any of them.

Thanks for the advice. I did trench one jub so we'll see what happens in the spring.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The problem with this situation that Cindy has is the very real possibility of two different "shock" scenarios coming together-which kind of makes it interesting. But also could be the lethal straw that broke the chance of successful transplanting endeavor. You have the "cold shock" that could come about if we get some seriously cold weather in the next few months which most likely will happen, and then the "root shook" that will happen (or maybe not because of the cold weather shutting down root development) if she cuts the roots now. When you normally cut roots in order to transplant in a later time, cold weather is usually not part of the concern. Here is it-which is what I think is interesting! (Sorry Cindy-I know you just want a successful transplant of your palms).

If it were me, knowing that you can wait, I would start to dig around all of the palm mid-March (give or take a week or so after looking at the 10 day weather report) and then make the move mid April. As to whether some will transplant better than others, I would go for them all with as big a root ball as possible, and maybe waiting a few more wks in April to move the trickier ones. You have nothing to lose by not trying them all. Chances are that whoever you sell to could think that they were ugly, or just in the way of their garden plans and cut them down. Good luck! I hope they all make it, and let us know how it goes as I sure am interested to know!

Yea, I have nightmares of someone chainsawing my washy filibusta that has about 18 ft of trunk now. . :-(. I'll keep you posted. Thanks

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you contact Ken?....he is the person to talk to. If you want to talk about liquor....talk to me :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would second talking to Ken Johnson about root pruning techniques, how and when. Ken is the most experienced grower I know in transplanting large palms. When you can successfully transplant large copernicias, with those sensitive roots, you are very good. Also, I would ask Ken how to plant and care for them afterward. The advice I have been given from Ken has been right on target.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Did you contact Ken?....he is the person to talk to. If you want to talk about liquor....talk to me :)

Sent him a PM. We'll see if he responds. I was hoping others here had experience with transplants.

thanks

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • i know braheas hate to have there roots messed with. im pretty sure Jubs move pretty well. i dont know if its just my bad luck but ive tried to dig washies and pot them and they always die on me.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had a few discussions with Ken on pruning. He sometimes only digs a trench around part of the perimeter, then allows the palm to recover for a few months, than starts to continue tthe perimeter trench. I saw him once doing this with a 10' plus sabal causiarum, and the way he prunes/transplants you wont need to trim fronds on a sabal. He did a great job on my 10' overall copernicia fallaensis, its really starting to throw spears now after only 1 year. Root pruning on sensitive species can be a slow process and should be done when roots are growing because roots often regrow from the trunk to the edge of the rootball which he burlaps off. the transplants I have received from Ken has lots of new little roots in the rootball ready to grow into the ground. Ken will not deliver a dug palm until he thinks its ready. I have transplanted small brahea armatas, big ones are harder. Transplanting big palms is a skill for sure, you can damage the roots by even levering the trunk when handling. Some palms like livistona, phoenix and even beccariophoenix are relatively easy, just dig a good size rootball, trim back fronds and replant with plenty of good soil. Others are harder, including brahea, bismarckias, copernicias, Kentiopsis.... these are beyond my skill/experience...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Someone say Ken Johnson? I'll be right there.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Someone say Ken Johnson? I'll be right there.

As soon as he climbs down that Talipot

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have a root pruning shovel?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow what a surprise... a shame in a way, considering your garden was looking so good! When we made the move to our new place I took many of the same plants your planning on taking ( minus the sabals mine were either to small or to big to take). Anyhow I too waited till late march to start root pruning and pulled everything out of the ground a few weeks later. Everything transplanted well for me and all of the palms made the transplant.

Sadly a year later I lost my biggest hybrid (BxJ) to a beetle attack that I didn't see/catch in time.

Do take pictures of your project.... below is a picture of some of my palms about to be hauled over to the new place! Took three truck loads like this... helped to establish the new garden!

I wish you luck!!!

post-362-0-04930400-1357603218_thumb.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Do you have a root pruning shovel?

Where do I buy one? :-)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have had a few discussions with Ken on pruning. He sometimes only digs a trench around part of the perimeter, then allows the palm to recover for a few months, than starts to continue tthe perimeter trench. I saw him once doing this with a 10' plus sabal causiarum, and the way he prunes/transplants you wont need to trim fronds on a sabal. He did a great job on my 10' overall copernicia fallaensis, its really starting to throw spears now after only 1 year. Root pruning on sensitive species can be a slow process and should be done when roots are growing because roots often regrow from the trunk to the edge of the rootball which he burlaps off. the transplants I have received from Ken has lots of new little roots in the rootball ready to grow into the ground. Ken will not deliver a dug palm until he thinks its ready. I have transplanted small brahea armatas, big ones are harder. Transplanting big palms is a skill for sure, you can damage the roots by even levering the trunk when handling. Some palms like livistona, phoenix and even beccariophoenix are relatively easy, just dig a good size rootball, trim back fronds and replant with plenty of good soil. Others are harder, including brahea, bismarckias, copernicias, Kentiopsis.... these are beyond my skill/experience...

Thank you Tom for your insight and sharing your experience. I have a half dozen braheas....I soooo want them to live after transplant.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow what a surprise... a shame in a way, considering your garden was looking so good! When we made the move to our new place I took many of the same plants your planning on taking ( minus the sabals mine were either to small or to big to take). Anyhow I too waited till late march to start root pruning and pulled everything out of the ground a few weeks later. Everything transplanted well for me and all of the palms made the transplant.

Sadly a year later I lost my biggest hybrid (BxJ) to a beetle attack that I didn't see/catch in time.

Do take pictures of your project.... below is a picture of some of my palms about to be hauled over to the new place! Took three truck loads like this... helped to establish the new garden!

I wish you luck!!!

Hi John

Thanks for sharing. That is great news that you had good success...you know I have all those jubs....I do not want to lose them.

Did you wrap roots in burlap? You haD some nice species. That sabal mex you gave me is growing fine...I will try to save it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually I wrapped everything in plastic tarps... while the palms were out of the ground, it helped keep some of the moisture around the rootball. The plastic tarps also helped when it came to 'dragging' the palms around front and loading them onto the truck! :)

I sure hope you can save all your palms, especially those beautiful jubs!!! Jv

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Actually I wrapped everything in plastic tarps... while the palms were out of the ground, it helped keep some of the moisture around the rootball. The plastic tarps also helped when it came to 'dragging' the palms around front and loading them onto the truck! :)

I sure hope you can save all your palms, especially those beautiful jubs!!! Jv

Good idea JV. Hadn't thought of that. Thanks!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cindy, the link didn't work for me as it seems you have to have an account...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, you can't leave that! It's got to be the biggest in NC.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's nice!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, I may be able to offer some advice on the one in the picture. Here is step one.

After the CAT scan let me know what the soil is like. I would tie up ALL the leaves so you can work in there. DO NOT cut any leaves off! (they are a measuring device for shock) After you make a mark on the ground as a guide, cut 25% of the circle you drew. The diameter (about 4 feet but may be less) will depend on the soil conditions and the final weight that you can pick up and transport without banging the ball (roots and soil) around. Dig about 2 feet deep and open the ditch very wide...enough so you can step into ditch. This is so you will have room to dig UNDER the ball later. When ditch is done leave it open and untie the leaves. Take a picture that day and then take a picture a month later and show pix to me.If it looks as if nothing has happened you can move to the next step. Yes you can start NOW.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think tying up the leaves of a jubaea that size would be too much work for me. Your gonna need like 5 people to cinch that thing up. :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If its any help, Gary levine dug many that size or smaller from his field to sell and I think they all did fine. :)

And if any of you know Gary.. he probabaly considered doing it on Sat. afternoon... by Sunday it was in a 30 gal tub... The man has no Patience :):lol:

But to be on the safe side, Ken offers some sage advice..

oh yeah... looks KILLER Cindy!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think tying up the leaves of a jubaea that size would be too much work for me. Your gonna need like 5 people to cinch that thing up. :)

I have a few tricks MattyB....kind of like how a guy hangs a giant sign by himself.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh, I may be able to offer some advice on the one in the picture. Here is step one.

After the CAT scan let me know what the soil is like. I would tie up ALL the leaves so you can work in there. DO NOT cut any leaves off! (they are a measuring device for shock) After you make a mark on the ground as a guide, cut 25% of the circle you drew. The diameter (about 4 feet but may be less) will depend on the soil conditions and the final weight that you can pick up and transport without banging the ball (roots and soil) around. Dig about 2 feet deep and open the ditch very wide...enough so you can step into ditch. This is so you will have room to dig UNDER the ball later. When ditch is done leave it open and untie the leaves. Take a picture that day and then take a picture a month later and show pix to me.If it looks as if nothing has happened you can move to the next step. Yes you can start NOW.

That jub is in a high raised bed in good soil, but there is red clay beneath. It is still winter up here and we may get some really cold stuff next week, so I am going to wait until that passes before starting to dig. We have a large tractor with a back hoe that we will use to lift it to a trailer. If I understand you correctly, I should only cut 1/4th of the circle now.

Thanks

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If its any help, Gary levine dug many that size or smaller from his field to sell and I think they all did fine. :)

And if any of you know Gary.. he probabaly considered doing it on Sat. afternoon... by Sunday it was in a 30 gal tub... The man has no Patience :):lol:

But to be on the safe side, Ken offers some sage advice..

oh yeah... looks KILLER Cindy!

Hi Bill

That jub is from Gary. I am hoping it can tolerate 2 transplants.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If its any help, Gary levine dug many that size or smaller from his field to sell and I think they all did fine. :)

And if any of you know Gary.. he probabaly considered doing it on Sat. afternoon... by Sunday it was in a 30 gal tub... The man has no Patience :):lol:

But to be on the safe side, Ken offers some sage advice..

oh yeah... looks KILLER Cindy!

Hi Bill

That jub is from Gary. I am hoping it can tolerate 2 transplants.

Hahahaha MOST of Garys palms are transplanted all around his place all the time! no worries!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes you can cut 1/4 now. You should IMO.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • Pindo Palm shedding it's boots
      By Ponds & Palms
      My brother in law has a pindo palm he got about 3 years ago from a local dealer in North Carolina so we don't know how old the palm is.  We live in zone 7b and for the most part the tree has been fine. He wraps the trunk and bottom fronds in burlap in the winter to keep it warm and with a pretty mild winter this past year all the fronds were still green unwrapping it ! Now it appears that the bottom boots are falling off (see pictures) the trunk exposed is rock hard so it doesn't seem rotten, so what is going on? There are no signs of bugs and the center spear has put out about 4 new fronds this summer. 


    • Windmill Fronds Eaten Alive!
      By Ponds & Palms
      Found this guy (massive grasshopper) munching away at some windmill fronds at my inlaws house!  He did surprisingly quite a lot of damage on a 3-4 ft. tree.  Check your fronds, just posting this to say keep an eye out, I live in North Carolina.

    • Anyone Got Pictures of zone 8+ Palms In Zone 7 or Below?
      By PalmTreeDude
      Anyone have pictures of zone 8+ palms in zones 7 or lower? Please post them here!
    • Palm ID needed! What kind of Phoenix palm? In Columbia, SC!
      By smithgn
      I know this is probably better suited for the cold hardy forum, But I thought I could use the help from some of you Californians- as this is certainly NOT a cold hardy palm in my area!
       So, there is only one other Phoenix palm in the Columbia area that I know of and it's a Canariensis. The following palms pictured below seem to be some sort of hybrid with a suckering habit. The fronds are a no-doubt striking grey/bluish color. Not green like a Canariensis. These two survived the frigid winters of 2014 and 2015 where we got down to 10 and 11 degrees. Interestingly enough, these palms were planted in front of a brick clubhouse in a rather nice neighborhood right off of the lake, so it's no doubt this helped. The lake is approximately 250 yards away while the building blocks the north/northwest winds and the palms face in a south/southeast direction.
      Sorry in advance for the bad pictures; I managed to snap these pictures right before the sun went down. Hopefully I can post more when the sun is out if anyone wants a better look.
      Thanks in advance!


    • Duppy's 2nd Annual Mule Update, now with Bismarckia!
      By Duppy
      It's been a rough year already.  Baseball sized hail that is getting me a new roof, gutters, exterior doors and 3 windows.  The mules took it like a champ.  The Bizzy well,  that little dork is a fighter!   First the mules. 
      Day 1 in the ground.

      12 Months later.

      And now 2 years in the ground.  The one on the right measures in at 7.5 feet to the top of the oldest spear.