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Dypsis pilulifera in habitat

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Some pictures i took in january in Analamazaotra's Parc (Andasibe)

It's a so beautiful palm ... An incredible meeting :drool:

GBPIX_photo_515108.jpg

GBPIX_photo_515109.jpg

GBPIX_photo_515110.jpg

GBPIX_photo_515111.jpg

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GBPIX_photo_515112.jpg

:D

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Beautiful palm.

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An impressive sight! I'd love to be there when an old frond peels off, to see if it sports that famous orange color underneath. The angle of your photos suggests a height of maybe 7 meters? These are famously slow growers; I wonder how old the palm is when reaching this height.

As always, many thanks for posting your habitat photos, Olivier.

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Fantastic Olivier! Thank you!

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An impressive sight! I'd love to be there when an old frond peels off, to see if it sports that famous orange color underneath. The angle of your photos suggests a height of maybe 7 meters? These are famously slow growers; I wonder how old the palm is when reaching this height.

As always, many thanks for posting your habitat photos, Olivier.

Olivier, I'm with Kim. Did you witness any hint of orange on any of the crownshafts that you saw? I can't see any in your pics.

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I always rush to open your posts and yet again am not disappointed! As an aside are there documented populations of the "Orange Crush" form in habitat or was this just a one-off collection?

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As an aside - I see some irregularity or "plumoseness" in the fronds in Olivier's pics, whereas all the Orange Crush palms here in Hawaii are remarkable for their almost perfect symmetry and no "irregularies" with the leaflet arrangement - with the possible exception of one plant I think I remember Bo saying he had that was plumose.

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As an aside - I see some irregularity or "plumoseness" in the fronds in Olivier's pics, whereas all the Orange Crush palms here in Hawaii are remarkable for their almost perfect symmetry and no "irregularies" with the leaflet arrangement - with the possible exception of one plant I think I remember Bo saying he had that was plumose.

Yes, that's what I meant Dean. PoM describes them as having irregularly arranged pinnae (i.e. plumose). Are there other large Dypsis with regular and plumose forms? Some start regular and go plumose so maybe some just get stuck. Would be interesting to know if Orange Crush is a common variation or a rare one.

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As an aside - I see some irregularity or "plumoseness" in the fronds in Olivier's pics, whereas all the Orange Crush palms here in Hawaii are remarkable for their almost perfect symmetry and no "irregularies" with the leaflet arrangement - with the possible exception of one plant I think I remember Bo saying he had that was plumose.

I couldn't help but make the same observation. I planted 52 "Orange crush" in my old garden. 51 had the perfect symmetry of the leaflets that Dean is describing above, and only one had irregularly grouped leaflets. Other than the leaflets, that individual looked identical to the other 51. And to refresh everyone's memory - when my first Orange crush began to produce flowers and fruit/seed, I sent samples to John Dransfield at Kew. He identified it positively as Dypsis pilulifera.

Bo-Göran

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I wonder who took the time to polish the trunk? face-icon-small-happy.gif

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Don't rush to join the Orange Crush . . .

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What a beauty, that tall green trunk is mesmerising...

Thanks for posting...

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As an aside - I see some irregularity or "plumoseness" in the fronds in Olivier's pics, whereas all the Orange Crush palms here in Hawaii are remarkable for their almost perfect symmetry and no "irregularies" with the leaflet arrangement - with the possible exception of one plant I think I remember Bo saying he had that was plumose.

I couldn't help but make the same observation. I planted 52 "Orange crush" in my old garden. 51 had the perfect symmetry of the leaflets that Dean is describing above, and only one had irregularly grouped leaflets. Other than the leaflets, that individual looked identical to the other 51. And to refresh everyone's memory - when my first Orange crush began to produce flowers and fruit/seed, I sent samples to John Dransfield at Kew. He identified it positively as Dypsis pilulifera.

Bo-Göran

Bo,

Do you happen to remember if you ever saw any orange on that one individual? Of course I am speculating that maybe the "regular" D. pilu. is the "orange or oranger form," and the irregular D. pilu. may be a "green or greener form."

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As an aside - I see some irregularity or "plumoseness" in the fronds in Olivier's pics, whereas all the Orange Crush palms here in Hawaii are remarkable for their almost perfect symmetry and no "irregularies" with the leaflet arrangement - with the possible exception of one plant I think I remember Bo saying he had that was plumose.

I couldn't help but make the same observation. I planted 52 "Orange crush" in my old garden. 51 had the perfect symmetry of the leaflets that Dean is describing above, and only one had irregularly grouped leaflets. Other than the leaflets, that individual looked identical to the other 51. And to refresh everyone's memory - when my first Orange crush began to produce flowers and fruit/seed, I sent samples to John Dransfield at Kew. He identified it positively as Dypsis pilulifera.

Bo-Göran

Thanks Bo, Is that grouped and fanned or just grouped? They need to be grouped and fanned to give the plumose look.

cheers

Richard

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Richard,

Hmmm...I truly don't recall, and I don't have access to the palm anymore. I know I have close-up shots of the leaflets, but they are among thousands and thousands of other photos over the last several years. Would be tough to find. I know I posted something with photos showing the differences but it had to be at least a couple of years ago. I am sure before 2010.

Bo-Göran

EDIT - but I don't recall that "52nd" palm having a plumose look. The palm in Olivier's photos above definitely strikes me as a different palm from what I have been used to as Orange crush.

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I agree, my orange crush ( Piuliffera ) has wider leaflets very regular and closely spaced. Those don't look like any of Bo's or mine.

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hhhmmm

I've already beat this horse... so i'll just quietly observe.. :winkie:

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Richard - WOW - Google! Now, why didn't I think of that!? :mrlooney: Thanks! And I find John Dransfield's comment "I want to warn you about taking the descriptions in POM as being gospel truth. They are only true to what we knew in 1995" particularly interesting. :)

Bo-Göran

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Richard - WOW - Google! Now, why didn't I think of that!? :mrlooney: Thanks! And I find John Dransfield's comment "I want to warn you about taking the descriptions in POM as being gospel truth. They are only true to what we knew in 1995" particularly interesting. :)

Bo-Göran

In POM, Dypsis pilulifera is said to be tristichous. Anyone find this to be or not be the case?

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I like the link.. thanks Rich.

I have forgot entirely that John had expressed some doubts.. did he ever return to address this in a different thread I wonder?

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I like the link.. thanks Rich.

I have forgot entirely that John had expressed some doubts.. did he ever return to address this in a different thread I wonder?

Bill,

Not that I know of. Considering the fact that it's now been 17 years since POM was published, I don't think it should be surprising to any of us that there are likely to be lots of revisions to POM. Not to mention many new species. And even a new genus (Tahina). And who knows, probably even more. Madagascar is about 35% larger than California. That's a LOT of territory to cover, especially considering how remote and inaccessible many areas are.

Bo-Göran

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In POM, Dypsis pilulifera is said to be tristichous. Anyone find this to be or not be the case?

I think that palm above is tristichous though this is a hard feature to determine without being directly underneath. My Orange Crush (a sample of one!) is also growing in three planes.

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