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Lubbers Are Back


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#1 Jerry@TreeZoo

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 02:50 PM

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After a warm winter I am predicting a bumper crop of these pests. I have already killed hundreds of these little guys in my yard. Only the juveniles so far. They are gregarious and if you see one, there are bound to be dozens more close by. I have come upon several "herds" while walking around my place and immediately do the Mexican Hat Dance on them. So far, I mostly find them in the grass, they have not found the Crinum yet, that is their favorite food.

Anybody else see them?
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So many species,
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#2 palmislandRandy

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 04:59 PM

I've never seen one at my place, but a friend, less than a mile away has them every year. These things are huge! :crying:
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"If you need me, I'll be outside"                  -Randy Wiesner                       Palm Beach County, Florida Zone 10Bish    

#3 Ray Tampa

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 02:51 AM

I just fed a nice sized colony a well balanced diet of Sevin dust.
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subtropical USDA Zone 10A

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#4 Patricia-CR

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 09:11 AM

I hate the damage most grasshoppers and family do... :rage:
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Patricia

 


#5 MattyB

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 09:16 AM

At my old place, a small yard in a regular residential neighborhood, every year we'd have grasshoppers come in and do some damage to plants. They are voracious! When we moved into my new place with the adjacent canyons and open space I saw thousands of them, all over the place. They would fly away as you walked down the trail. I was scared! :o But I soon found that the native canyon birds (that are not found in residential neighborhoods) are so effective at keeping these grasshoppers in check, that I've never had any noticeable damage to my plants that I can remember. A grasshopper moves and BAM!!!!!! those scrappy little brown birds are on it, like a hobo on a ham sandwhich!
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Matt Bradford
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Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)
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#6 Jastin

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 08:44 PM

I bought a hobo a subway sandwich and he refused it.
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#7 Stevetoad

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 09:07 PM

1332305078[/url]' post='518955']
I bought a hobo a subway sandwich and he refused it.


I just ate a hotdog! Sorry i didn't mean to offend you...
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#8 palmmermaid

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 04:10 AM

At my old place, a small yard in a regular residential neighborhood, every year we'd have grasshoppers come in and do some damage to plants. They are voracious! When we moved into my new place with the adjacent canyons and open space I saw thousands of them, all over the place. They would fly away as you walked down the trail. I was scared! :o But I soon found that the native canyon birds (that are not found in residential neighborhoods) are so effective at keeping these grasshoppers in check, that I've never had any noticeable damage to my plants that I can remember. A grasshopper moves and BAM!!!!!! those scrappy little brown birds are on it, like a hobo on a ham sandwhich!



Matty,

The problem with the lubbers is that they are toxic to most if not all other animals. They get the toxin from their favorite food - crinums.

I have these things and I do the 2-step on all of them I find. I know they lay eggs in the soil around the crinums. If I could find the eggs I would destroy them.
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Palmmermaid

Kitty Philips
West Palm Beach, FL

#9 Tad

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 05:26 AM

I used to see a few here and there around the farm (grasshoppers in general) but I think the guinneas eat just about everything they can see so I never really see much damage.
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#10 Eric in Orlando

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 05:35 AM

I have seen some around my yard but I have no crinums. But they do also like Selloums (Philodendron bipinnatifidum). I leave them as the many Cuban Tree Frog pals in my yard eat them, I think. I only see a few giants later in summer
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Eric
Orlando, FL
zone 9b/10a

#11 MattyB

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 08:07 AM

Tad!!!!!!!! The Lubbers called you back?
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Matt Bradford
"Manambe Lavaka"
Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)
10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)
9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

#12 Ray Tampa

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 10:04 AM

Eric,

Cuban Tree Frogs? They are worse than the grasshoppers. Kill them too.

Ray
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Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA
subtropical USDA Zone 10A

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#13 Eric in Orlando

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 01:33 PM

I embrace the Cuban Tree Frogs. They have voracious appetites and eat so many insects. I know they are not "native" but neither are the brown anoles and neither are going anywhere. Just like humans they are here to stay and new permanent residents. I still have native green tree frogs but they have just adapted like the green anoles have. They tend to avoid my porch lights at night where the Cubans congregate. They stay more along the dark walls and vegetation and in the bromeliads.

My girlfriend HATES the Cuban Tree Frogs, they creep her out as big as they are, and I have relocated over 30 to my house in the past year. Anyone who has them feel free to bring them to my place !!!
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Eric
Orlando, FL
zone 9b/10a

#14 Tad

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 06:18 PM

Tad!!!!!!!! The Lubbers called you back?

nah, I posted a livistona question on the main board earlier and was just checking things out
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Things may come to those who wait, but only the things left by those who hustle.
Abraham Lincoln

The way of the transgressor is hard

#15 MattyB

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 07:07 PM

Welcome back!
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Matt Bradford
"Manambe Lavaka"
Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)
10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)
9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

#16 edric

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 02:36 AM

Hi Jerry, killed about fifty yesterday, spent an hour a day hunting for Lubbers last year, around 200 hours all told, killed over 300 on my property alone (single lot), even Dursban (Chloropyrifos), I know they they banned Dursban 18 years ago, but I almost never use it, it acts like water on them, and may have an effect later, but haven't noticed, I have to use my boot too, Ed
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MOSQUITO LAGOON
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#17 Tad

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 02:57 AM

if you can get a hold of it, Lorsban 4E is a great tool, it kills, scale,grasshoppers,beetles,roaches,fleas,ticks, mites,mealy bugs, caterpillars, ants, thrips,whitefly, and just about every yard pest known to man.
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Things may come to those who wait, but only the things left by those who hustle.
Abraham Lincoln

The way of the transgressor is hard

#18 Ray Tampa

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 03:59 AM

Eric,

Cuban tree frogs eat the native frogs and toads and native Florida anoles. Take it from this Cuban :winkie: . I won't go looking for them but if one is spotted, it gets two bricks or a shovel.

Ray
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Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA
subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA
subtropical USDA Zone 10B

#19 Creekside

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 05:02 AM

Lubbers make my broms look like Swiss cheese. They like orchids, too. I like it when they line up on the fence, just waiting for my machete. :(
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Catherine Presley

Old Miakka
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Sarasota

#20 palmmermaid

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 05:13 AM

I'm with Ray. If it isn't a native animal I kill it if I can. Iguanas, Cuban tree frogs, brown anoles - they are all fair game. I am almost as bad when it comesto non-native plants - at least the invasive ones. My husband and I do a once-around the garden every month looking for melaleuca, brazilian pepper, old world climbing fern, australian pines, and any other of those nasty exotics. It is a constant battle to keep them in control.
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Palmmermaid

Kitty Philips
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#21 amazondk

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 04:37 AM

There is a very similar grasshopper here. Although they are bigger than the lubbers when adult. I sprayed some of the babies with Raid last year and it killed them nearly instantly. I used the Raid in the pruple can, I don´t know iif iit the same as sold there.

dk
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