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Coryline fruticos/terminalis flower spikes - why?

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Hi

I have some small Hawaiian Tis (Corydline fruticosa) under a metre which are all throwing out flower spikes. These spikes emerge rapidly; within a few days they are almost bigger than the entire plant! I am fairly new to these plants and wanted to know was there any trigger (climatic/environmental) which triggers flowering ? - the ones in nearby gardens are not flowering. I'd prefer they grow more leaves instead!. Or does it just mean they are happy?

Thanks

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They are happy, but if you are not, just cut the spikes off before the plant expends its energy there. Otherwise, you might want to let it go to seed and try your hand at propagation.

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They are happy, but if you are not, just cut the spikes off before the plant expends its energy there. Otherwise, you might want to let it go to seed and try your hand at propagation.

Hehe ... they are a bit small so I'll cut them off so they can get bigger first. Have you had any experience propagating them from seed?

Thanks

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Wait till they are a bit bigger before removing them.........the best way is to grab the inflorescence low down and give it a solid pull and it should come out thereby allowing the plant to resume growing normal sized leaves.

I have propagated thousands of these plants in the past, they are very easy to propagate and the seed has a relatively long life.

I generally don't bother seed propagating Cordyline fruticosa as most are hybrids and the resulting offspring are nothing like the parents. It can be fun though with some seedling batches producing different colours and leaf shapes. Problem is that you end up being left with a heap of crap colourless plants taking up space that need to be put through the mulcher or given away.

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Wait till they are a bit bigger before removing them.........the best way is to grab the inflorescence low down and give it a solid pull and it should come out thereby allowing the plant to resume growing normal sized leaves.

I have propagated thousands of these plants in the past, they are very easy to propagate and the seed has a relatively long life.

I generally don't bother seed propagating Cordyline fruticosa as most are hybrids and the resulting offspring are nothing like the parents. It can be fun though with some seedling batches producing different colours and leaf shapes. Problem is that you end up being left with a heap of crap colourless plants taking up space that need to be put through the mulcher or given away.

Thanks for the information - the last thing I need are more unwanted plants to try to re-home! They are hardy plants and quite common around here.

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There are a few cultivars that would get hit by cold down your way (but would still survive).........You can also grow the New Zealand Cordyline australis cultivars as well........they are hopeless here in our humid summers.

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There are a few cultivars that would get hit by cold down your way (but would still survive).........You can also grow the New Zealand Cordyline australis cultivars as well........they are hopeless here in our humid summers.

We aren't too cold for these plants, I haven't seen one here damaged by cold yet. Burke's Backyard describe their best climate as "Sydney, Perth and areas north".

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Burke's Backyard have never been an authority of Ti's.............you probably haven't seen one damaged by cold there as the most subseptible cultivars are probably not grown there. Most varieties probably will do fine in your area but I know some collectors in Sydney that DO have problems with growing certain types.......Some of the orange cultivars in particular seem to go off a bit and can end up with some unsightly spotting or necrotic patches during the winter months.

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