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Plant/shrub ID


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#1 PalmatierMeg

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 11:18 AM

Today I found this shrubby plant for 1/2 price at an unnamed location. I liked that it appears to have a caudex and very architecturally interesting eliptical dark green leaves. While the caudex is gray, new stems are speckled with dark spots. Can anybody give me the scientifically name of this plant (I got only bovine stares from nursery staff and the idiot supplier called it "houseplant"). If it can survive my ferocious sun/heat/humidity I'd like to put it on our new lot. Thanks.

Caudex shrub 01 3-15-12.JPG Caudex shrub 02 3-15-12.JPG
Caudex shrub 03 3-15-12.JPG

Trunk/caudex
Caudex shrub 04 3-15-12.JPG
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Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.


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#2 Trava

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 02:20 PM

Maybe Ficus abutilifolia?
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#3 mnorell

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 03:32 PM

Polyscias scutellaria (aka Polyscias balfouriana). One of the tropical "aralias" or panaxes...this and its close generic kin have long been standard material in tropical and warmest subtropical areas (e.g., Hawai'i and Florida) especially for hedging and also for specimen use.
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Michael Norell

Big Pine Key, Florida | 24° 40' N 81° 21' W | elev. 4.5 ft. | Zone 11b | Calcareous substrate
- avg annual min. approx. 48F | Jan 65/75F, July 83/89F | Historical extreme: approx. 41F

Natchez, Mississippi | 31° 33' N 91° 24' W | elev. 220 ft.| zone 9a | Downtown/river-adjacent microclimate | Loess substrate
- avg min. 23F / lows: 24F | 27 | 23 | 23 | 24 | 18 | 23 | 27 | 27 | 18 (2013-14) | Jan 43/61F, July 73/93F | Extreme: 2.5F (1899)


#4 kahili

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 02:32 AM

I thought it looked like a panax as well, although its the largest leaf panax that I have seen. If so, they propagate easily from cuttings if you want to have more of them. They grow really fast (at least other panax do) and make great hedges
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#5 ariscott

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 02:35 AM

it does look like aralias
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Ari & Scott

Darwin, NT, Australia
-1232'53" 13110'20"

#6 Tropicgardener

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 04:20 AM

it does look like aralias

Aralia is the old name for these plants (still commonly used). Polyscias is the accepted name now. Arno King did a good article in the latest edition of SubTropical Gardening magazine on them. They are somewhat an old fashioned plant here and you see many old woody examples growing around old wooden 'Queenslander' homes. I have a few growing in my garden as I really like them.
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Andrew,
Airlie Beach, Whitsundays

Tropical Queensland


#7 ariscott

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 04:38 AM

I had nightmare about them as we had to remove lots of them that grew all twisted before we started a garden back in Gove. I have one big leave one, because it was given to me... But I won't buy them.

Edited by ariscott, 16 March 2012 - 04:38 AM.

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Ari & Scott

Darwin, NT, Australia
-1232'53" 13110'20"

#8 bahia

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Posted 17 March 2012 - 02:02 PM

Only seen as a houseplant here in San Francisco, and they are super slow growing here because it never gets hot for more than a day or two. Looks good indoors with bright light, does it take full sun in south Florida or Queensland? Interesting to get a perspective of the Polyscias as a weed to be discouraged, when they're so unusual here. Sounds like it should do well if protected from frost, getting fairly large if not clipped.
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#9 Tropicgardener

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 03:08 AM

Only seen as a houseplant here in San Francisco, and they are super slow growing here because it never gets hot for more than a day or two. Looks good indoors with bright light, does it take full sun in south Florida or Queensland? Interesting to get a perspective of the Polyscias as a weed to be discouraged, when they're so unusual here. Sounds like it should do well if protected from frost, getting fairly large if not clipped.

Yes they do best in full sun in coastal Queensland as we have plenty of humidity in the summer months. They will also grow ok in the shade too but the variegated forms may loose some colour. They are highly variable from the big dinner plate leaved form (Ari was talking about) to ones with fine almost Maidenhair fern like foliage.
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Andrew,
Airlie Beach, Whitsundays

Tropical Queensland





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