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my jbq


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#1 NCpalmqueen

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 04:47 PM

This is one of Patric's jbq's that I bought in 2008 (I think) when it had 1-2 strap leaves. We took off the winter protection which obviously wasn't needed since winter never really stopped by.
Third year in the ground in zone 7b/8a in NC. Last winter all spears pulled and I thought it was a goner. The trunk is fattening up nicely on it.
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This is one of my jubaeas that I got from Tejas Tropicals a few years back. No problem with NC red clay, humidity, heat, or summer rains. I keep them dry during winter.
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Lastly, a flash shot of one of my trachycarpus palms.
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Cindy
:)

Zone 8, Elev. 350'
Raleigh/Apex, NC
Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

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#2 redant

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 05:03 PM

They look perfect. congratulations.
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#3 DALION

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 06:45 PM

So what will you do once they are 10+ feet tall? Will you still cover them or let them take the cold at that point? They look great by the way.
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#4 NCpalmqueen

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 03:57 AM

If I live long enough to see my jubs or my jubaea hybrids reach ten feet tall, A] I will be in utter amazement, B]God will have treated me kindly, and C] I'll hire a crane to cover them for winter. :mrlooney:
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Cindy
:)

Zone 8, Elev. 350'
Raleigh/Apex, NC
Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

#5 iamjv

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 03:13 PM

Cindy those jubs you got from Tejas Trop look great!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Really stunning! Jv
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Jv
San Antonio Texas / Zone 8
extremes past 21 yrs: 117F (47.2C) /  14F (-8.8C)
http://www.palmsocietysouthtexas.org/
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#6 Sutter Bob

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 05:50 PM

Great looking stuff. Very inspiring. Your winter must have been pretty mild there.
I'm worried about my only BXP hybrid here but my mule did fine.
Got the first two Jubaeas in the ground here last year - both doing fine.
Looking forward to some updates down the road.
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#7 NCpalmqueen

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 03:36 AM

Great looking stuff. Very inspiring. Your winter must have been pretty mild there.
I'm worried about my only BXP hybrid here but my mule did fine.
Got the first two Jubaeas in the ground here last year - both doing fine.
Looking forward to some updates down the road.


Yes, it was a 'no' winter here in NC. For some reason, I can not keep a mule alive, but I can keep the jubaeas and jub hybrids alive. Go figure.
Please post a photo of your jubs!
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Cindy
:)

Zone 8, Elev. 350'
Raleigh/Apex, NC
Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

#8 freakypalmguy

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 07:30 AM

All are looking great Cindy. I have a JBQ from the same batch as yours and it's right about the same size. Mine shows some blue on the underside of the leaflets, have you noticed this on yours?

Matt
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Hot and dry in the summer, cold with light frost in the winter. Halfway between the desert and the ocean.
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#9 NCpalmqueen

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 03:53 AM

All are looking great Cindy. I have a JBQ from the same batch as yours and it's right about the same size. Mine shows some blue on the underside of the leaflets, have you noticed this on yours?

Matt


Thanks. I see blue only under certain lighting conditions. It is a pretty green, though. After last winter, this plant took about 3 months to fully recover from spear pulls. Since there is no recovery period this Spring, I expect it should put on some bulk this year. I have another smaller one in the ground that also went through its first (pseudo) winter and wasn't harmed, so life is good. :)
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Cindy
:)

Zone 8, Elev. 350'
Raleigh/Apex, NC
Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

#10 ArchAngeL01

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 05:55 AM

You're not far from me. I read Jubaeas couldn't take our humidity and heat etc. But now I see other wise.
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East Coast zone 8b. 


#11 buffy

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 02:03 PM

It's funny. I have the same Gary Levine sourced Jubaea from Tejas Tropicals and the Jubutygrus from Patric. Ours look about exactly the same except I have a little more size on the hybrid due to not losing but one spear last year.

On the Jubaea, the first two years it creeped along. Starting last fall, mine started to really accelerate. Most of my stuff spends two years growing roots before accelerating. My hybrids are an exception.
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Longview, Texas - 8A: Haven't had anything below 10F since '89. Airport reported 14F in '96 and 13F in '10. I run about 3F warmer than the rural airport. So, technically two (2) Zone 8a winters in the past 20 years.
Winter Low at My House - '06-'07: 19.9F / '07-'08: 24.0F / '08-'09: 24.7F / '09-'10: 16.1F / '10-'11: 17.5F / '11-'12: 27.4F / '12-'13: 28.5F / '13-'14: 17.9F
Temperature Gauge Mounted 8' off the Ground and 6' East of the House.


#12 NCpalmqueen

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 04:30 AM

You're not far from me. I read Jubaeas couldn't take our humidity and heat etc. But now I see other wise.



Hi
There seems to be a lot of conflicting information around. The heat and humidity of NC does not affect the jubs. The heat and humidity of Florida, however, may have negative impact. My soil here is red clay...soil in Fl. is mainly sand. I don't know of anyone who has successfully grown jubs longterm in sandy soils. One of my jubs has been in the ground for 8 yrs.....certainly not 'long term' but a surprise for me.

There is a long term jub in Rock Hill, SC, and it is beautiful. It receives no winter protection. It is trunking nicely. So, give a jub a shot! :winkie:
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Cindy
:)

Zone 8, Elev. 350'
Raleigh/Apex, NC
Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

#13 NCpalmqueen

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 04:34 AM

It's funny. I have the same Gary Levine sourced Jubaea from Tejas Tropicals and the Jubutygrus from Patric. Ours look about exactly the same except I have a little more size on the hybrid due to not losing but one spear last year.

On the Jubaea, the first two years it creeped along. Starting last fall, mine started to really accelerate. Most of my stuff spends two years growing roots before accelerating. My hybrids are an exception.


Buffy
We obviously have the same palm tastes! I bought multiples of Tejas' large jubs...all look different. I did lose one due to summer drought then winter stress. Please post your jbq!
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Cindy
:)

Zone 8, Elev. 350'
Raleigh/Apex, NC
Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

#14 iamjv

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 05:43 AM

.There is a long term jub in Rock Hill, SC, and it is beautiful.


I remember reading about that jub.... didn't it belong to a lady named Tamar, who use to post regularly here???? (Wonder what happened to her...)

It would be great if someone had a pic of that jub and post it for us to see.
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Jv
San Antonio Texas / Zone 8
extremes past 21 yrs: 117F (47.2C) /  14F (-8.8C)
http://www.palmsocietysouthtexas.org/
http://community.web...tropicaljohnnyv


#15 NCpalmqueen

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 06:34 AM


.There is a long term jub in Rock Hill, SC, and it is beautiful.


I remember reading about that jub.... didn't it belong to a lady named Tamar, who use to post regularly here???? (Wonder what happened to her...)

It would be great if someone had a pic of that jub and post it for us to see.


I took these 2 yrs ago in RockHill. Yes, this is Tamar's former residence.
Posted Image

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If you can not see the photos, I will redo...working from my ipad. :D
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Cindy
:)

Zone 8, Elev. 350'
Raleigh/Apex, NC
Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

#16 ArchAngeL01

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 08:02 PM

If they won't survive in sand then they probably won't survive here. My soil is complete sand since I live on a barrier island. UNLESS I can amend the soil somehow. I wish I could at least try.
Thanks for those pics and info!
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East Coast zone 8b. 


#17 palmtreeguy

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 10:22 PM



.There is a long term jub in Rock Hill, SC, and it is beautiful.


I remember reading about that jub.... didn't it belong to a lady named Tamar, who use to post regularly here???? (Wonder what happened to her...)

It would be great if someone had a pic of that jub and post it for us to see.


I took these 2 yrs ago in RockHill. Yes, this is Tamar's former residence.




If you can not see the photos, I will redo...working from my ipad. :D



Wow, I remember reading about that Jubaea in the archives here a couple of years ago. Tony Avent says it was planted in 1993, so it must have been large when planted. How is that surviving in zone 8a SC with a average low of 10.6F? Unusually hardy genetics? In the winter of 2002/2003 it would have been through 6F, wow, I wonder if it was protected then or not. Did Tamar tell the lowest temperature it has seen unprotected?

If that's a more cold hardy/wet tolerant one, it would amazing to cross it with Butia palms that survived the 1980s in Atlanta of below zero temperatures. Then we might have a super Feather palm that would be great for zone 7b and grow pretty fast.
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#18 iamjv

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 05:37 PM

Cindy thanks for posting those shots! Amazing palm!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Luv the size of that trunk, just awesome! Hope the new owners of Tamar's place are palm lovers too!
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Jv
San Antonio Texas / Zone 8
extremes past 21 yrs: 117F (47.2C) /  14F (-8.8C)
http://www.palmsocietysouthtexas.org/
http://community.web...tropicaljohnnyv


#19 NCpalmqueen

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 03:47 PM

Cindy thanks for posting those shots! Amazing palm!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Luv the size of that trunk, just awesome! Hope the new owners of Tamar's place are palm lovers too!

You're welcome. I am glad I dug that photo out...it gives me hope for mine!
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Cindy
:)

Zone 8, Elev. 350'
Raleigh/Apex, NC
Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

#20 kahili

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 11:19 AM

I was looking through my old (1985) The Palm Quarterlys' that the Temperate Zone Chapter of the IPS put out and Tamar was the editor then. She wrote of a Jubaea that someone had given her and was at least 12 years old in 1985. At the time she was living in Ohio and although she resigned as editor because she was going to move to California, she ended up in South Carolina and I believe its this Jubaea that was planted in Rock Hill. So the Jubaea in the above pics is at least 40 yrs old. If I remember also, its been transplanted at least once
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#21 NCpalmqueen

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 03:47 PM

I was looking through my old (1985) The Palm Quarterlys' that the Temperate Zone Chapter of the IPS put out and Tamar was the editor then. She wrote of a Jubaea that someone had given her and was at least 12 years old in 1985. At the time she was living in Ohio and although she resigned as editor because she was going to move to California, she ended up in South Carolina and I believe its this Jubaea that was planted in Rock Hill. So the Jubaea in the above pics is at least 40 yrs old. If I remember also, its been transplanted at least once


Yep, that's the jubaea. I think it was in a pot for 18 years, something like that, before it ever got planted. When I visited it during one of the SPS meetings, the current owner said that she does not protect it. But, you can tell from the photos that it is sited very nicely in a walled in courtyard surrounded by trees....a great microclimate. I need to make an annual pilgrimage there to keep tabs on it---about 3 hrs southwest from me.
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Cindy
:)

Zone 8, Elev. 350'
Raleigh/Apex, NC
Bone dry summers, wet winters, 2-3 days ea. winter in low teens.

#22 Keith in SoJax

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Posted 26 March 2012 - 06:59 AM

Having lived in that general area for 4 years, its important to note that this Jub endures freezing rain and snow virtually every year. The Freezing rain can be terrible. The 4 years I lived there, we had a 2' snowfall in Februray and an ice storm that knocked power out to a huge portion of NC and upstate SC. So, in short, it's not a California winter climate.
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Winter Haven, FL, about 1 hour drive (60 miles/100 km) from both Tampa and Orlando
Summers are great, 90f/32c in the day & 70f/21c at night with plentiful rain & sun
Winters are subtropical with occasional frosts and freezes. Tropical cyclones happen.
Every 20 years or so it gets cold enough to kill arborescent Ficus benjamina to the ground.
We have a few Royal palms in the warm microclimates.

#23 howfam

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 06:00 PM

You're not far from me. I read Jubaeas couldn't take our humidity and heat etc. But now I see other wise.

Hi
There seems to be a lot of conflicting information around. The heat and humidity of NC does not affect the jubs. The heat and humidity of Florida, however, may have negative impact. My soil here is red clay...soil in Fl. is mainly sand. I don't know of anyone who has successfully grown jubs longterm in sandy soils. One of my jubs has been in the ground for 8 yrs.....certainly not 'long term' but a surprise for me.

 a long term jub in Rock Hill, SC, and it is beautiful. It receives no winter protection. It is trunking nicely. So, give a jub a shot! :winkie:

 That's encouraging, maybe Jubaea would be successful in the interior areas of Florida's panhandle region (Tallahassee area), which also has red clay soil.


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#24 howfam

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 06:02 PM

You're not far from me. I read Jubaeas couldn't take our humidity and heat etc. But now I see other wise.



Hi
There seems to be a lot of conflicting information around. The heat and humidity of NC does not affect the jubs. The heat and humidity of Florida, however, may have negative impact. My soil here is red clay...soil in Fl. is mainly sand. I don't know of anyone who has successfully grown jubs longterm in sandy soils. One of my jubs has been in the ground for 8 yrs.....certainly not 'long term' but a surprise for me.

There is a long term jub in Rock Hill, SC, and it is beautiful. It receives no winter protection. It is trunking nicely. So, give a jub a shot! :winkie:

That's encouraging, maybe Jubaea would be successful in the interior areas of Florida's panhandle region (Tallahassee area), which also has red clay soil


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#25 Xerarch

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 06:33 PM

It seems that there is some confusion about palms that don't like heat and humidity like Jubaea, Trachycarpus, etc. From what I can tell, it isn't that they can't take any heat and humidity, it is the constant heat and humidity with hardly any reprieve that wears them down, year round conditions like those in Florida. I'm not surprised at their success in places like NC and SC even though it is plenty hot and sticky in the summer. There are a number of Jubaea in Dallas that also has gets plenty of summer heat yet still cools down for winter.
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#26 JasonD

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 02:38 PM

You're not far from me. I read Jubaeas couldn't take our humidity and heat etc. But now I see other wise.



Hi
There seems to be a lot of conflicting information around. The heat and humidity of NC does not affect the jubs. The heat and humidity of Florida, however, may have negative impact. My soil here is red clay...soil in Fl. is mainly sand. I don't know of anyone who has successfully grown jubs longterm in sandy soils. One of my jubs has been in the ground for 8 yrs.....certainly not 'long term' but a surprise for me.

There is a long term jub in Rock Hill, SC, and it is beautiful. It receives no winter protection. It is trunking nicely. So, give a jub a shot! :winkie:

 Jubaea does fine in sand soils here in San Francisco, but the climate is profoundly unlike the Southeast's.


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Jason Dewees
Inner Sunset District
San Francisco, California
Sunset zone 17
USDA zone 10a
21 inches / 530mm annual rainfall, mostly October to April
Humidity averages 60 to 85 percent year-round.
Summer: 67F/55F | 19C/12C
Winter: 56F/44F | 13C/6C
40-year extremes: 96F/26F | 35.5C/-3.8C




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