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Ceroxylon parvum, C.pityrophyllum and Wallichi?,a disticha

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All three of these palms are currently growing up at the UC Berkeley Botanic Garden, which I visited this past Sunday. All three are very attractive specimens which caught my eye, and I'm interested to hear of anyone who may be growing these in California. I quickly discovered that BGL has the Wallichia growing in Hawaii, but it seems very uncommon here in northern California. The smaller mature size makes its monocarpic nature less threatening, and I find the vague resemblance to a Caryota part of its charm.

I see there are some nice samples of this Wallichia at the BGL garden, but I'm more interested to hear of any California or northern California growers/experience.

In the same section of the gardens, two rare Ceroxylon species, C. parvum and C. pityrophyllum, both from Bolivia were looking very good, with approximately ten foot or more trunk heights. Both have more graceful arching foliage at young sizes than the species I've seen at SF Botanic Garden. Are there California nursery sources for parvum and pityrophyllum as young plants? Anyone growing either here in California? Again after a web search, it appears C. parvum has been discussed on this forum previously and is being grown in Florida.

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David,

We have a couple of 5g Ceroxylon parvum here at Flora Grubb Gardens.

There's a new revision of Ceroxylon available. Reading it makes me think the plants labeled parvum here and at UC Bot will be returned to pityrophyllum, the name their were originally labeled with.

http://www.mapress.com/phytotaxa/content/2011/f/pt00034p064.pdf - it's a 64-page PDF.

Wallichia densiflora performs reasonably well in the Bay Area, as well. The Wallichia disticha at UCBot are the only ones I recall seeing in any size north of Santa Barbara.

-Jason

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David,

We have a couple of 5g Ceroxylon parvum here at Flora Grubb Gardens.

There's a new revision of Ceroxylon available. Reading it makes me think the plants labeled parvum here and at UC Bot will be returned to pityrophyllum, the name their were originally labeled with.

http://www.mapress.com/phytotaxa/content/2011/f/pt00034p064.pdf - it's a 64-page PDF.

Wallichia densiflora performs reasonably well in the Bay Area, as well. The Wallichia disticha at UCBot are the only ones I recall seeing in any size north of Santa Barbara.

-Jason

Agreed Jason. I now realise that my plant thought to be parvum is likely to pityrophyllum as the seed came from Bolivia. I suspect many of the parvum out there are from the same seed source. Parvum is now considered to be found in just two sites in Ecuador. Now to get me some parvum seed!

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Hey,

my experience is from another continent but my garden is at about the same latitude of San Francisco. Only difference is that here summer is very xerothermic so warm mediterranean while SF has a cool mediterranean climate. I grow a from seed a Wallichia disticha, that has survived many times frost and snow (for more details about past frost look at the recent topic cold damage report from Athens). It has also survived abusing treatment by my dog! (It chewed one leaf and so the distichus appearance got lost). My opinion is that this sp. by age becomes sufficiently cold hardy but in my climate is an extremely slow grower, because during my hot and dry summer stops to grow. In a cool mediterranean climate with moister air it may grow considerably faster.

post-6141-089013300 1333743099_thumb.jpg

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