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Arenga pinnata

10 posts in this topic

Four of them, in 12" "band pots" plants about 12" tall, one night of 24.8 F (-4 C) 30% damage, after that, into the garage . . .

dave

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Update:

Four weeks after they were exposed to three nights of 24.8 F (-4.4 C) and a fourth consecutive night at 27.8 F.  No white frost.

post-208-1170011722_thumb.jpg

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But they are starting to grow again.

post-208-1170011775_thumb.jpg

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Arenga pinnata, in ground since a small seedling, now has big 6 feet long fronds and getting bigger. Very robust and cold tolerant, able to handle our 800-1200 annual chill hours without flinching, takes 28-30F without damage here without any canopy, so fully exposed. Mechanical damage from wind becomes a bigger problem as this palm gets bigger and fronds hit other plants. Grows very well in Sunset zone 16.

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Axel, has yours ever opened up a leaf in fall or winter? I have trouble with mine not being able to green up a leaf when it's cold, and subsequently becomes sun burned. Either that or the new leaf is tender and becomes cold burned. Not sure which exactly.

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Axel, has yours ever opened up a leaf in fall or winter? I have trouble with mine not being able to green up a leaf when it's cold, and subsequently becomes sun burned. Either that or the new leaf is tender and becomes cold burned. Not sure which exactly.

I think I know the answer to your dilema; No then Yes. Try to keep plant dry during cold season, this might slow down its growth rate.

Edited by Phoenikakias
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Axel, has yours ever opened up a leaf in fall or winter? I have trouble with mine not being able to green up a leaf when it's cold, and subsequently becomes sun burned. Either that or the new leaf is tender and becomes cold burned. Not sure which exactly.

Mine pretty much shuts down from about thanksgiving through mid-February. I usually don't fertilize after mid October and I also shut down the irrigation system at that time. Last year it still pushed a frond right into November but it readily greened up. After that it sat idle. A spear just re-appeared about 3 weeks ago and is getting bigger. I applied fertilizer about 3 weeks ago. We had our first above 90F reading a few days ago, it seems to have kicked into higher gear.

Keep in mind this palm is growing on a steep West facing hillside, during the lowest sun angles mid Nov through late Jan there isn't much sun there. That may change when this thing starts to get some height.

This has been a solid 10a/upper 9b plant for me. (My garden's extreme lows average somewhere around 31F.)

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Mine (facing east) has pushed completely a new spear from November to February but without irrigation it did not open it until last week, when I gave it for the first time this year a good watering with the hose. After this it seems to have been awakened from winter hibernation and opens new leaf rapidly.

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I saw JD Andersen's arenga micrantha and his is a single trunk up to 8 feet height and it's just now starting to sucker. It looks jusrt like what I thought was my pinnata. I now think it's just a micrantha. So for the moment, disregard my comments above. But until I get a sucker I won't know for sure.

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Axel, it is very easy to tell those spss apart. Arenga pinnata has long spiny fibers along the trunk. If you post a picture of your plant emphasizing on leaf sheaths surely we can help you with the identification. Arenga micrantha needs tons of water and has no problem growing leaves during the winter. So a positive identification has also practical importance.

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