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Queen palm ban


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#1 Cycadcenter

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 02:06 PM

Bundaberg Regional Council (Queensland) has declared the Syagrus romanzoffiana a PEST and if you have any they will have to be removed.

Wonder what will be the next on their list?



Schedule 1 Declared local pests
Section 5
Column 1
Applicable part of local governmentís
area
Column 2
Declared local pest
The whole of the local government area
of the local government.
Brazilian cherry Eugenia uniflora
Cocos palm Syagrus romanzoffiana
Easter cassia Senna pendula var. glabrate
Leucaena Leucaena leucocephala
Schedule 2 Persons exempted from offence of
introducing etc declared local pest
Section 6(2)
Column 1
Exempt person
Column 2
Declared local pest
No exempt person prescribed.
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#2 Mark Heath

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 02:25 PM

Wow! The government telling you what plants/palms that you can plant???
I am a Queen palm lover and i know that many people here don't share my views but keep in mind,,, it starts with one!!!
Thanks for the info.
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#3 DoomsDave

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 02:27 PM

Wow! The government telling you what plants/palms that you can plant???
I am a Queen palm lover and i know that many people here don't share my views but keep in mind,,, it starts with one!!!
Thanks for the info.


Here the [expletive] list is a lot shorter, including Cannabis sativa . . .

That said, it is a bit extraordinary.
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#4 peachy

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 03:15 PM

Rommies were banned from sale by our council (Ipswich) 15 years ago. They are not permitted to be planted either, however existing palms are left alone. Probably because the council had planted them by the 100s decades earlier and they would have to remove all their own as well. However they permit Tipuana tipu to be planted and sold, which is a far worse pest than poor old rommies could ever be. Even the dreaded Chinese elms can't reproduce as quickly.
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#5 Chris in Murrieta

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 04:29 PM

Wow that's very interesting, curious to see where this goes in a few years.
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#6 LJG

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 07:24 PM

If someone told me I had to remove one I would say "this is a Syagrus picrophylla". They would have to prove you wrong somehow.
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#7 Tyrone

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 07:30 PM

I think they should pay for the removal if they are going to force that on on you.
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Millbrook, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Winter 8C to 16C min/max, Summer 15C to 24C min/max. Approx 850mm rainfall with a winter peak. Driest month Feb with 25mm. 9km (5miles) from Southern Ocean. 6km (3.5miles) from Oyster Harbour. 13m asl. 1/3 clay, 2/3 peat soil on a flood plain.

 

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#8 MattyB

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 07:41 PM

If someone told me I had to remove one I would say "this is a Syagrus picrophylla". They would have to prove you wrong somehow.

Thats awesome!
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#9 yachtingone

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 08:01 PM

Lets see them remove my syagrus provemewrong!!!
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#10 santoury

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 08:23 PM

So, are they banned in Queensland ? Australia ? Or where ? Does this mean I cannot plant my seeds ? (Oops, I forgot, they are Syagrus kellyana ;) )
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#11 Tropicgardener

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 09:09 PM

This move certainly doesn't surprise me, I am no lover of Queen Palms (I hate the things) but what concerns me is the fact that this is being done by a council with a very lacklustre environmental and parks and gardens department that seems to have its strings pulled by a few self centered idealistic individuals..........

I was for a long time a resident of Bundaberg which for those who don't know quite a large regional centre which was build on the sugarcane industry. I was involved with garden societies and clubs in the area as well as local authorities who just would not listen to reason.......I am surprised that they haven't banned palms altogether as there is a very strong 'Anti Tropical' sentiment that runs deep in that town.......Despite the quite sublime warm subtropical climate there were more roses and gerberas grown in the town.

The yearly spring 'Bundy in Bloom' festival which included a gardening competition even had clauses which excluded tropical style gardens from being eligible to win the 'Champion Garden' section.

As for forcing residents to remove any Queen Palms from their properties, the council will first have to spend millions of ratepayer dollars removing the thousands that they have on council land!!..........If they do so..... You watch..........I bet you that they remove the Coconut Palms also !!!

Edited by Tropicgardener, 28 December 2011 - 09:11 PM.

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#12 Tyrone

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 09:54 PM

Now with much of the native forests gone, as well as food for the fruit bats etc, where will all the fruit bats go when the Syagrus are all cut down. Ah yeah, that's right, Melbourne Botanic Gardens.

If they cut down coconuts as well they are just ........................
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Millbrook, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Winter 8C to 16C min/max, Summer 15C to 24C min/max. Approx 850mm rainfall with a winter peak. Driest month Feb with 25mm. 9km (5miles) from Southern Ocean. 6km (3.5miles) from Oyster Harbour. 13m asl. 1/3 clay, 2/3 peat soil on a flood plain.

 

It rains 6 months of the year and the other 6 months it continues dripping off the trees. 

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#13 Nigel

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 01:24 AM

If the fruit bats are such a problem with queens , why dont they pass a law to compel owners to cut inflorescences and in the case that they dont they can be removed at request of neighbours who suffer the mess.
Still draconian but much fairer and common sensical.
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#14 peachy

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 02:14 AM

Well as the proud owner of several big beautiful healthy queens, I do get bats here by the dozen. So bloody what ? They are a part of the native fauna after all. I also get 100s of lorikeets, honeyeaters and pygmy gliding possums. I was sensible enough to plant them all inside the boundary fences so leaves, seeds etc etc all land in my yard nobody elses. The only reason I could ever live in Bundaberg without going completely insane would be my ability to grow a lot of the tropical style plants that I love so much. Apoligies to anyone from there, but it really doesnt have much to offer as a destination. BTW Andrew, Warwick is about the only place in the state where roses actually look like they should and not stunted scanty sticks with the odd flower so I dont know why they insist on temperate climate gardening when the tropicals would be much healthier and more attractive. Being an old bat myself, I will keep my queens if only to feed the flying foxes.
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#15 Steve the palmreader

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 04:13 AM

I am sure it is comeing to a town near all of us. It started with the native plant movement.In Florida certain palms are classified as type 2 invasives so watch out.:rage:
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#16 sur4z

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 08:14 AM

I'm no fan of the queen but I understand beauty is in the eye of the beholder. We have two Australian native plants on our invasive species list...Casuarina (Australian pine) and Melaleuca quinquenevia. I love the sound of the wind blowing through an Autralian pine but you can have the Melaleuca, which was introduced here to dry up the Everglades. The only way to kill it is to cut it down and that doesn't alway work...I saw one struck by lightening, which kills the pine, but after a dormant period it put out new growth.
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#17 Eric in Orlando

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 10:07 AM

I wish they would do a partial ban of queen palms in Florida...the sickly ones that aren't taken care of. Without good feeding or irrigation on our sandy soils or the marl in SoFL, they look sickly and horrible. Ban those !!!
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#18 Eric in Orlando

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 10:09 AM

I'm no fan of the queen but I understand beauty is in the eye of the beholder. We have two Australian native plants on our invasive species list...Casuarina (Australian pine) and Melaleuca quinquenevia. I love the sound of the wind blowing through an Autralian pine but you can have the Melaleuca, which was introduced here to dry up the Everglades. The only way to kill it is to cut it down and that doesn't alway work...I saw one struck by lightening, which kills the pine, but after a dormant period it put out new growth.



And in Queensland, Australia the Pond-Apple, Annona glabra is over running Melaleuca habitat. Pond-Apple is native to south Florida and it's habitat in the Everglades is being taken over by Melaleuca !!!
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#19 richnorm

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 11:40 AM

We have palms bans here too eg Phoenix canariensis. The banners are totally clueless. One pressure group (Forest and Bird) went on TV to support the ban claiming the Waitakere Ranges were over-run with Phoenix palms. Turns out they thought Nikau were CIDPs! All this banning is futile once an introduction has been made; evolution will determine what grows in the long run.
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#20 Gonzer

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 11:55 AM

Better watch out boys and girls. Pretty soon Big Brother's gonna be taking a peek over the fence into your yards.
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#21 Dave-Vero

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 11:06 PM

Easter cassia (Christmas cassia for us), Senna pendula, is ranked as a severe invasive in Florida. There's plenty of native (and non-native) sennas that aren't problems.

Tipuana tipu (Brazilian rosewood) is on my city's list of trees that can be planted in honor of someone in a city park. I haven't identified one yet. No reputation as a weed here.

Brazilian cherry (Eugenia uniflora) is a pest, so is Leucana.

Florida's soils (not just the limestone in the south) seem bad for Syagrus. Lack of micronutrients. There's some very nice ones in town, but they are vulnerable to a recently-arrived disease that causes sudden death.

Livistona chinensis has shown up on the (unofficial) invasive list, evidently based on very few cases of having naturalized.

Melaleuca quinquenervia control in Florida has been effective. It's essentially been removed from the Everglades.
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#22 WestCoastGal

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 11:44 PM

Not sure I understand why they banned the queen palms in Queensland (just putting it that way sounds contradictive). Was it to go back to native habitat, hate the tropical look, seed litter, bats that feed off the fruit, or something else?

I will say that my first thought about reducing bat food was that bats are known for consuming vast amounts of insects compared to their body weight. Seems like getting rid of mosquitos in a tropical area would be a good thing and help keep malaria and such under control.

We own two mule palms, which we absolutley love and admire every day, and I can't imagine our yard without them (ie missing parent!).
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#23 trioderob

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 12:04 AM

SO YOU CANT HAVE A QUEEN IN QUEENSLAND ?

GO FIGURE..........
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#24 Cycadcenter

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 12:57 AM

Now with much of the native forests gone, as well as food for the fruit bats etc, where will all the fruit bats go when the Syagrus are all cut down. Ah yeah, that's right, Melbourne Botanic Gardens.

If they cut down coconuts as well they are just ........................



Tyrone,

Your reference to coconuts is very topical. Here is a posting from another group.

Don't know if anyone else has ever been to Chili Beach on the Cape York Peninsular in Northern Queensland but it is a beautiful coconut tree lined beach and one of my favorite places in the world.

Regards, Bruce

The Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) are proposing to close the 'Esplanade as Road' for Kutini-Payamu (Iron Range) National Park CYPAL which includes Chili Beach. (Chilli Beach)

There is major concern that QPWS will remove the iconic Coconut Trees that line the beach. The trees are part of the history of the area and are part of the beauty and special character of Chili Beach. Nearby islands have had esplanades closed despite objections from Cook Shire and their Coconut trees have been removed. This is also of concern as coconuts can be a lifeline to stranded seafarers.

QPWS will also be able to restrict vehicle access to the area in front of the Chili Beach Camping Area and restrict marine vessel access to the National Park shoreline.

Residents of the area - Portland Roads, Weymouth Bay and Lockhart River are concerned and have only been given until Jan 5 to respond. Portland Roads and Weymouth Bay have a very low population with some 20-30 residents, they have created a petition but would like to include the many travellers who visit in the dry season.

If you love Chili Beach and would like to have your say please let us know and/or contact the ministers' office directly.

The Minister for Department Environment and Resource Management
PO Box 2066, Cairns Q 4870
Level 2 , William McCormack Place 5B Sheridan Street, Cairns Q 4870
fax 07) 4222 5060 ph 07) 4222 5296
Email Lorinda.morrissey@derm.qld.gov.au

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#25 Tropicgardener

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:37 AM


Now with much of the native forests gone, as well as food for the fruit bats etc, where will all the fruit bats go when the Syagrus are all cut down. Ah yeah, that's right, Melbourne Botanic Gardens.

If they cut down coconuts as well they are just ........................



Tyrone,

Your reference to coconuts is very topical. Here is a posting from another group.

Don't know if anyone else has ever been to Chili Beach on the Cape York Peninsular in Northern Queensland but it is a beautiful coconut tree lined beach and one of my favorite places in the world.

Regards, Bruce

The Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) are proposing to close the 'Esplanade as Road' for Kutini-Payamu (Iron Range) National Park CYPAL which includes Chili Beach. (Chilli Beach)

There is major concern that QPWS will remove the iconic Coconut Trees that line the beach. The trees are part of the history of the area and are part of the beauty and special character of Chili Beach. Nearby islands have had esplanades closed despite objections from Cook Shire and their Coconut trees have been removed. This is also of concern as coconuts can be a lifeline to stranded seafarers.

QPWS will also be able to restrict vehicle access to the area in front of the Chili Beach Camping Area and restrict marine vessel access to the National Park shoreline.

Residents of the area - Portland Roads, Weymouth Bay and Lockhart River are concerned and have only been given until Jan 5 to respond. Portland Roads and Weymouth Bay have a very low population with some 20-30 residents, they have created a petition but would like to include the many travellers who visit in the dry season.

If you love Chili Beach and would like to have your say please let us know and/or contact the ministers' office directly.

The Minister for Department Environment and Resource Management
PO Box 2066, Cairns Q 4870
Level 2 , William McCormack Place 5B Sheridan Street, Cairns Q 4870
fax 07) 4222 5060 ph 07) 4222 5296
Email Lorinda.morrissey@derm.qld.gov.au


I know Chili Beach quite well as I served as a Police Officer at Lockhart River.........nothing surprises me with the QNPWS. They have done this before in other parts of Queensland and refuse to acknowledge that Coconuts are in fact a Queensland native.
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#26 pindo

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:11 PM

Hello

Bat Conservation & Rescue QLD (Bats society) request the removal of Syagrus romanzoffiana because the palm fruit kill the flying foxes.
This is the website
http://www.bats.org.au/?page_id=11

and here you can read the reasons that support
http://www.bats.org....cocos_palms.pdf
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#27 Walter John

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 06:59 PM

Bundy, as it is affectionately referred to, happens to be the home of some influential people connecetd with another popular garden forum in this country. I used to be regular on that forum and it is heavily based on Roses and hardly includes palms whatsoever.

That's all I'm sayin'.

As for Queen palm removal, as someone said, council themselves must begin the slaughter and I agree, other palm species will get the chop as well, the idiots.
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#28 Tropicgardener

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 07:07 PM

Hello

Bat Conservation & Rescue QLD (Bats society) request the removal of Syagrus romanzoffiana because the palm fruit kill the flying foxes.
This is the website
http://www.bats.org.au/?page_id=11

and here you can read the reasons that support
http://www.bats.org....cocos_palms.pdf


Yes I have been told that the problem is that the seed wears down their teeth.......can't see a big problem with this considering that flying foxes are in plague proportions (in Queensland anyway).....don't listen to the vocal mouths from the south that say that they are endangered....that is utter crap!!!

Maybe we should be planting more Queen Palms !!! :rage: :rage: :rage:
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#29 Tropicgardener

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 07:15 PM

Bundy, as it is affectionately referred to, happens to be the home of some influential people connecetd with another popular garden forum in this country. I used to be regular on that forum and it is heavily based on Roses and hardly includes palms whatsoever.

That's all I'm sayin'.

As for Queen palm removal, as someone said, council themselves must begin the slaughter and I agree, other palm species will get the chop as well, the idiots.


Wal, I know exactly where you are coming from......I banged my head against a wall for 7 years in that place. Certain members of the gardening community stated to people I know that they hated me for coming into the place and establishing a tropical garden group.......Ironically it is still running almost 10 years later and is the largest club in Bundaberg!!

As for palms being removed, it has happened already.....I have been told that since council amalgamation many of the beachside Coconut Palms at Bargara have been removed some of which were the largest in South East Queensland.
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#30 Adam from Oz

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 07:50 PM

Two things:

1. For the Syagrus hating bat huggers, it would seem that removing the fruit would solve 97.7% of the problem (I calculated it... :mrlooney: ) A few cuddlies get caught in the fronds! PFFFT! SNIFF! WEEP! :wub:

"Paging Charles Darwin into Chat."



2. WHAT THE %$#&! What is it with Queensland and Coconut Palms? We all know they are native, why don't the officials? What's the point in removing them? It can't be cheap, it's with your tax paying dollar and WHAT'S THE REASON?

Just WHAT do they achieve?

Cheers,

Adam - a bit steamed - kinda warm in Melbourne at the mo'.

3. Think I'll go seduce a bat.
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#31 peachy

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 07:52 PM

OOOH Adam I didnt know you cared
Peachy
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#32 Adam from Oz

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 08:12 PM

Later, bePeached one.

I've found a Bat Chat Site and I think I'm onto "something"........................

http://www.batlovin'.com.au
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#33 pindo

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Posted 31 December 2011 - 05:18 PM


Hello

Bat Conservation & Rescue QLD (Bats society) request the removal of Syagrus romanzoffiana because the palm fruit kill the flying foxes.
This is the website
http://www.bats.org.au/?page_id=11

and here you can read the reasons that support
http://www.bats.org....cocos_palms.pdf


Yes I have been told that the problem is that the seed wears down their teeth.......can't see a big problem with this considering that flying foxes are in plague proportions (in Queensland anyway).....don't listen to the vocal mouths from the south that say that they are endangered....that is utter crap!!!

Maybe we should be planting more Queen Palms !!! :rage: :rage: :rage:



Yea °°°° I agree
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#34 Nigel

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Posted 01 January 2012 - 12:51 AM

Pindo, slightly off topic... I visited your site and you show syagrus rom with fat trunks you call litoralis. These look same as Santa Catarina queens bigger and fatter with the small round seeds.
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#35 pindo

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Posted 01 January 2012 - 07:20 AM

Nigel
Ola garoto...
… tudo bom para a ilha mais bonita do Brasil? Em poucos dias vou estar desfrutando das praias em Santa Catarina

As you know, Syagrus litoralis is an invention of someone in the area of ​​the province of Entre Rios (Argentina) to sell seeds. The name is not recognized. Nor as a species, variety or cultivar.

In my opinion (and I think you will agree with me) only corresponds to an ecotype that is often found in several places, both Brazil and Argentina

In my website, I mention them as examples, but I do not claim to exist as a species

Good year 2012 and the best germination

Cheers
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#36 Cedric

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Posted 01 January 2012 - 09:41 AM

Oh what a conundrum.

Yes going native has always appealed, such that I rung barked three hundred mega giant Aussie eucalypt (oops) on my property and watched with glee as hornbills and crested eagles etc turned their slowly dying shiny white bony fingers reaching into the sky into comfy lofts and sky high burrows to raise bbs. Small waterways again began trickling at their feet, eventually wondrous native palms, trees and flowering shrubs thickly lined their meandering sides returned along with a myriad of birds reptiles and mammals .....blah blah in short it was like watching Noahs Ark in reverse fast forward. Very rewarding for all concerned.

With proper management and strategy I think going native especially at a civic/council level is oooops [blush] the sexy thing to do. Palm Springs airport in America is a lovely example and one I witnessed at the time that caused quite a stir between the fractions but common sense prevailed and it is an exemplary example of sustainable, environmentally sound, forward thinking, not to mention aesthetically extreme bootifull project. One only hopes some of it will rub off onto gardeners in the village who mostly it seems think they are living in Miami. At night wear wellingtons if you like most foreigners walk cause the roads and pavements are literally running deep with water from sprinklers and irrigation systems whacking out precious water pumping up green lawns and tropical fantasies.

I must say though In my opinion that if a species is not rampantly taking over wilderness areas with seedlings or causing the decline of native fauna through toxins or lack of suitable habitat etc then mature specimens in a domestic or civic situation should be left well alone in all their glory but no new ones should be planted if there is even the slightest risk or precedent (local or international) of the afore mentioned eventually or more urgently already beginning to take place.

Management of the existing mature specimens should be such that the death penalty would secure the removal of the first signs of any neglect of local and national duty, that is that all signs of fruiting and or flowering are continuoulsy hastily and timely obliterated.Posted Image

Its a pity we cant single dose sterilise problem plants or can we?
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#37 Nigel

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Posted 01 January 2012 - 10:01 AM

Nigel
Ola garoto...
… tudo bom para a ilha mais bonita do Brasil? Em poucos dias vou estar desfrutando das praias em Santa Catarina

As you know, Syagrus litoralis is an invention of someone in the area of ​​the province of Entre Rios (Argentina) to sell seeds. The name is not recognized. Nor as a species, variety or cultivar.

In my opinion (and I think you will agree with me) only corresponds to an ecotype that is often found in several places, both Brazil and Argentina

In my website, I mention them as examples, but I do not claim to exist as a species

Good year 2012 and the best germination

Cheers


Hi pindo, dont worry, I know you were not claiming it was a species, I was just astonished to see it in that location, same plant same seeds.
I drove south into Rio grande do Sul and the population petered out completely so i did not imagine they would occur further south.
They are of course completely different from the litoralis being sold in europe which come from the sea coast !

I hope the weather here gets better , its rained non stop for 3 days. Where are you staying ? If you want to see some palms let me know !!!

Feliz ano novo
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Resident in Bristol UK.
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#38 Cedric

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Posted 01 January 2012 - 10:56 AM

I wish they would do a partial ban of queen palms in Florida...the sickly ones that aren't taken care of. Without good feeding or irrigation on our sandy soils or the marl in SoFL, they look sickly and horrible. Ban those !!!


The best reason yet.

Nothing in the world (well almost) like a magnificent well grown romanzoffiana, grown in a constant cool sunny morning mist belt or facing a constant finely moist waterfall spray, roots in rich soft damp clay head in the blue sky, absolutely inspiring. Robust and darkly luxuriant filling any space or place with a presence second to none.

More so than most commonly grown palms they carry a very deep and real sense of place, exotic evocative and mysterious.

Erm ok well its true[blush]. They have a unique sound in the wind too, their very own language that becomes almost song like when dry or like a buffaloe walking through elephant grass in the morning dew.

Badly or even moderately badly grown they are a complete waste of time, certainly a survivor (unfortunately as such neglected) but not the easiest number to get absolutely right by any chalk not even in the wild.

Cool constantly moist riverine/rain/mist micro climate forest in my opinion is where they are at their very very best, robust shiny and irresistible. Im planning growing some again after a gap of twenty years, seeds germinating as I type Posted Image

Believe me Eric I wouldn't even bother if I didn't have exactly the right natural conditions available to me its just not worth it they look so sad otherwise like skinny sick neglected puppies.



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#39 Cedric

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Posted 01 January 2012 - 07:16 PM

PS- almost all of palm Springs airport, I see bedding plants and green lawns crept in aaaarch! Its difficult letting go obviously but honestly pansies in a fabulous desert setting!!!!! Some people just dont realise what they have by way of bounty. Rocks glorious rocks....
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#40 Tyrone

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Posted 01 January 2012 - 08:14 PM

Queensland without coconut palms is a place not worth visiting anymore. It's a bit like the EPA walking into Kings Park and removing all the Kangaroo Paws and Callistemons as most of them are eastern state cultivars and therefore not "native".

As far as bats eating Syagrus seed, at least they have seed to eat. My dog eats them without any ill efects. Are they going to plant a heap of A alexandrae in the place of the Syagrus to support the bats. I doubt it. I can't see what Syagrus seed would do to a bat. Load of rubbish.

Removing coconuts from Lockhart river. WHY???????? About 50 people live there and it's way off the beaten track just getting there. Let the people keep their native coconut palms. Total wasted exercise.

Oh well, that's my rant for the day. Back out into the garden I go.

Tyrone
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Millbrook, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Winter 8C to 16C min/max, Summer 15C to 24C min/max. Approx 850mm rainfall with a winter peak. Driest month Feb with 25mm. 9km (5miles) from Southern Ocean. 6km (3.5miles) from Oyster Harbour. 13m asl. 1/3 clay, 2/3 peat soil on a flood plain.

 

It rains 6 months of the year and the other 6 months it continues dripping off the trees. 

The Tropical Look





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