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Ti's for color

117 posts in this topic

Just a few ti's on a rainy day

post-4755-098043900 1320731933_thumb.jpg

floppy

post-4755-053718200 1320732072_thumb.jpg

kaui rose bud

post-4755-066525300 1320732100_thumb.jpg

post-4755-031322400 1320732152_thumb.jpg

Peter buck

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Great color on the Rose Bud, I need a few of those to go in the t garden.

Got any cuttings?

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Bill, all knockouts, what is the Black one called? Keep em comn Bill, i know you have tons of them. Pete

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More? :drool:

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I've seen a black one sold as Roy's Black... not sure if these are the same. This one doesn't get much sun.

post-1234-043208700 1320793734_thumb.jpg

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Bill let me know if you would be interested in swapping a cutting for "Floppy" We have over 70 varieties of ti but we don't have that one yet. :)

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LOL Dean just informed me that you gave him a bunch of tis in the past! :) :)

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I'm really liking the tis in the garden. They are strong rooters, dont require a lot of water, and do good in full sun. I also like that they get above the height of rabbits, something that a lot of other colorful companion plants dont do and therefore prevents me from using them

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I'm really liking the tis in the garden. They are strong rooters, dont require a lot of water, and do good in full sun. I also like that they get above the height of rabbits, something that a lot of other colorful companion plants dont do and therefore prevents me from using them

Probably easy for you, but hard for me - keeping the leaves on in winter. Many types I have tried just drop leaves. But then some do great. Kind of like Crotons, just need to try them all and see what works.

The issue is snails. Especially in a wet winter.

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LOL Dean just informed me that you gave him a bunch of tis in the past! :) :)

Sorry is was not me floppy is new for me.

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Len - I have a lot more luck with ti's than crotons...Snails/slugs have not been a major problem for me, nor defoliage during winter.

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Joe, I think you are on to something with lava rock as I would guess snails are not a fan. As far as Ti's, it really depends on what you try. I can't get the cool white/pinks or rainbowed colored Ti's to grow well. Even Purple Prince and Willys Gold gives me trouble.

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I find that I have to give those colourful one a bit of shade... so I usually plant them in morning sun. A bit like broms really... sometimes it can be tricky to place. Once they are happy, they should grow well for you. Maybe just move them around in pots before you plant them and see how they go?

Regards, Ari :)

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LOL Dean just informed me that you gave him a bunch of tis in the past! :) :)

Sorry is was not me floppy is new for me.

I meant some other tis... not floppy. We need that one :D

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Bill, all knockouts, what is the Black one called? Keep em comn Bill, i know you have tons of them. Pete

Looks very much like one we have here in Australia known here as 'Vanuatu'....names do vary from place to place.

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Bill, all knockouts, what is the Black one called? Keep em comn Bill, i know you have tons of them. Pete

Looks very much like one we have here in Australia known here as 'Vanuatu'....names do vary from place to place.

We have Vanuatu here too. I have to see which one it was again...

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I'm really liking the tis in the garden. They are strong rooters, dont require a lot of water, and do good in full sun. I also like that they get above the height of rabbits, something that a lot of other colorful companion plants dont do and therefore prevents me from using them

Probably easy for you, but hard for me - keeping the leaves on in winter. Many types I have tried just drop leaves. But then some do great. Kind of like Crotons, just need to try them all and see what works.

The issue is snails. Especially in a wet winter.

I'm sure you have more experience with Tis than me Len. I'm just getting started with these, but the few that I have tried all perform with flying colors. My "kiwi", the rainbow colored white, green, pink hasn't been through a winter yet though. David Bain, Hollywood Palms has many many different types of tis and his garden has inspired me to try as many as I can. He said the kiwi types need full sun, which is opposite of what I would have expected because of all the white on them.

As far as snails go, I have 2 different types: the standard garden snail that we all have, and then I have a native canyon snail which is very large, has a shell that looks just like a regular snail, but their flesh is black. They don't need moisture year round, they just form a seal on their shell and wait it out in the canyon waiting for the rainy season. I have a lot of them, but I also have a lot of skunks and the skunks just shmorgusborg on these things and really keep them in check. Also, sometimes neighborhood chickens wander into the yard and they will eat every single snail, then I will eat them, so really I'm eating my own snails. What were we talking about again?

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I'm really liking the tis in the garden. They are strong rooters, dont require a lot of water, and do good in full sun. I also like that they get above the height of rabbits, something that a lot of other colorful companion plants dont do and therefore prevents me from using them

Probably easy for you, but hard for me - keeping the leaves on in winter. Many types I have tried just drop leaves. But then some do great. Kind of like Crotons, just need to try them all and see what works.

The issue is snails. Especially in a wet winter.

I'm sure you have more experience with Tis than me Len. I'm just getting started with these, but the few that I have tried all perform with flying colors. My "kiwi", the rainbow colored white, green, pink hasn't been through a winter yet though. David Bain, Hollywood Palms has many many different types of tis and his garden has inspired me to try as many as I can. He said the kiwi types need full sun, which is opposite of what I would have expected because of all the white on them.

As far as snails go, I have 2 different types: the standard garden snail that we all have, and then I have a native canyon snail which is very large, has a shell that looks just like a regular snail, but their flesh is black. They don't need moisture year round, they just form a seal on their shell and wait it out in the canyon waiting for the rainy season. I have a lot of them, but I also have a lot of skunks and the skunks just shmorgusborg on these things and really keep them in check. Also, sometimes neighborhood chickens wander into the yard and they will eat every single snail, then I will eat them, so really I'm eating my own snails. What were we talking about again?

I don't know but I think you called me a chicken.

I doubt you will have issues as you grow much harder stuff. Most the ones sold around gardens here do fine. The cool online ones are the ones that gave me trouble. Ti plants. Not chickens.

About the chickens, that is a damn good idea. I wonder of you can rent chickens?

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Do a turkey, tis the season

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Ti plants look great with palms. Here is one of my many Ti plants.

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Ti plants look great with palms. Here is one of my many Ti plants.

Edited by Tampa Scott
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The Ti in the garden...

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and a few more....

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a few more...

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:wub:
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a few more...

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a few more...

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a few more...

What's the second one?

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and a few more....

What's the one with the white?

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a few more...

What's the second one?

Angela, The second one is Morning Sunshine.

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and a few more....

What's the one with the white?

Pink Magic

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Black Magic (US)

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Scott, do you have all of these lovely Ti's at your garden?

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I just took these pics the other weekend when I was taking photos of palms & trees. Very common cordylines... but I still love them. Most of my 'different' ones aren't worth taking photos yet.

post-512-033344900 1321909521_thumb.jpg

post-512-042074200 1321909545_thumb.jpg

Regards, Ari :)

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Scott, do you have all of these lovely Ti's at your garden?

Patricia,

All pictured plants are in my garden. I am a Ti junkie and have many more and adding more all the time.

Scott

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and a few more....

What's the one with the white?

Pink Magic

:rolleyes: I didn't recognize it!

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I just took these pics the other weekend when I was taking photos of palms & trees. Very common cordylines... but I still love them. Most of my 'different' ones aren't worth taking photos yet.

post-512-033344900 1321909521_thumb.jpg

post-512-042074200 1321909545_thumb.jpg

Regards, Ari :)

Funny how your "common" cordylines are not so common over here.

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Here's some I grew from seed...

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post-1234-071058500 1321963852_thumb.jpg

post-1234-020382400 1321963942_thumb.jpg

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post-1234-007633400 1321964109_thumb.jpg

post-1234-007660700 1321964216_thumb.jpg

post-1234-039808000 1321964367_thumb.jpg

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Angela how long from seed to the size in your post take ?NIce ti'sgreenthumb.gif

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Angela how long from seed to the size in your post take ?NIce ti'sgreenthumb.gif

Thanks! I didn't really take note of when I germinated those particular ones... but the first ti I grew from seed took three years to reach a height of five feet. I'm guestimating that those in the photos are about two years old.

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