Jump to content


RarePalmSeeds

Photo

Cool Cordyline Species


  • Please log in to reply
26 replies to this topic

#1 JasonD

JasonD

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 915 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, California

Posted 26 April 2011 - 07:44 PM

Another pitch: Who's growing Cordyline banksii, C. indivisa?
  • 0
Jason Dewees
Inner Sunset District
San Francisco, California
Sunset zone 17
USDA zone 10a
21 inches / 530mm annual rainfall, mostly October to April
Humidity averages 60 to 85 percent year-round.
Summer: 67F/55F | 19C/12C
Winter: 56F/44F | 13C/6C
40-year extremes: 96F/26F | 35.5C/-3.8C

PalmTalk Advertising

#2 Tropicgardener

Tropicgardener

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 974 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Airlie Beach, Whitsunday Region. Tropical Queensland.

Posted 28 April 2011 - 11:54 PM

Neither of those species will grow here as they don't like the combination of heat and humidity :(
  • 0

Andrew,
Airlie Beach, Whitsundays

Tropical Queensland


#3 Eric in Orlando

Eric in Orlando

    Rank: SETTING SEED

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 5,182 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Orlando, FL, USA

Posted 29 April 2011 - 12:20 AM

Cordyline dracaenoides

Posted Image



Cordyline manners-suttoniae

Posted Image

Posted Image



Cordyline petiolaris

Posted Image
  • 0
Eric
Orlando, FL
zone 9b/10a

#4 Tropicgardener

Tropicgardener

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 974 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Airlie Beach, Whitsunday Region. Tropical Queensland.

Posted 29 April 2011 - 01:53 AM

Eric, nice to see some of the Australian Cordylines in cultivation in the U.S. Cordyline manners-suttoniae is found locally in my area.
  • 0

Andrew,
Airlie Beach, Whitsundays

Tropical Queensland


#5 Palm crazy

Palm crazy

    Rank: FLOWERING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 1,474 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington State, z8a 47N.

Posted 29 April 2011 - 01:30 PM

Another pitch: Who's growing Cordyline banksii, C. indivisa?


Here's my C.indivisa, photo was from last year, I grew it from a plug. Doesn't need much heat to grow and one of very few that likes a little shade.
Two photos.
Posted Image

Cordyline A. 'torbay dazzler', this photo is from January this year, planted since then.
Posted Image

Edited by Palm crazy, 29 April 2011 - 01:36 PM.

  • 0

Last six winter lows… 12F, 15F, 15F, 26F, 25F, 16F. 

 

                                            


#6 daxin

daxin

    Rank: SEEDLING

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 230 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bay Area

Posted 29 April 2011 - 08:59 PM

Jason,

San Marcos has C. banksii and Monrovia has C. indivisa. Gary Gragg has some but not sure which species. Here is a photo from last year.

Cordyline.JPG
  • 0
Fragrant Hill Design
www.fragranthill.com
Mountain View, California

#7 Tropicgardener

Tropicgardener

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 974 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Airlie Beach, Whitsunday Region. Tropical Queensland.

Posted 30 April 2011 - 04:23 AM

Jason,

San Marcos has C. banksii and Monrovia has C. indivisa. Gary Gragg has some but not sure which species. Here is a photo from last year.

Cordyline.JPG


I can almost certainly say that these are Cordyline petiolaris......An Australian native from the humid subtropics of Queensland and Northern New South Wales.
  • 0

Andrew,
Airlie Beach, Whitsundays

Tropical Queensland


#8 Palm crazy

Palm crazy

    Rank: FLOWERING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 1,474 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington State, z8a 47N.

Posted 02 May 2011 - 10:28 AM

Jason,

San Marcos has C. banksii and Monrovia has C. indivisa. Gary Gragg has some but not sure which species. Here is a photo from last year.

Cordyline.JPG



Monrovia has it wrong.
Some growers in the USA are still using the incorrect name C. indivisia, but are really growing C. 'australis'. To bad they are not growing the real C. indivisia , a much more exotic looking cordyline.
I got mine from 'Rare plant research' a nursery just outside of Portland, Oregon.

Edited by Palm crazy, 02 May 2011 - 10:32 AM.

  • 0

Last six winter lows… 12F, 15F, 15F, 26F, 25F, 16F. 

 

                                            


#9 santoury

santoury

    Rank: FLOWERING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 1,180 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:MA

Posted 02 May 2011 - 11:59 AM

Dracaena indivisa (???) is sold as a plug plant here in New England, and costs $1 each, or less - very common and used as an annual. Can somebody please confirm that is really what they are, or a Cordyline, or what ?
There's also a purple leaf form of the same.
  • 0
I write a plant newsletter, if you would like to be added on my e-mail list! Let me know.

#10 JasonD

JasonD

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 915 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, California

Posted 03 May 2011 - 04:43 PM

Dracaena indivisa (???) is sold as a plug plant here in New England, and costs $1 each, or less - very common and used as an annual. Can somebody please confirm that is really what they are, or a Cordyline, or what ?
There's also a purple leaf form of the same.

The green ones used as annuals in New England are Cordyline australis. The colorful ones are selections and hybrids of same, like 'Atropurpurea', 'Dark Star', and 'Red Star'.

Daxin, I've not yet seen San Marcos's C. banksii crop.
Suncrest had a crop of either C. indivisa or C. banksii last year (can't remember which) but it turned out to be C. australis.
I once grew a crop off the now-deceased C. banksii at SFBG, some individuals of which are still scattered around town (including in my backyard). Some of them are clear X self and others are X australis.
  • 0
Jason Dewees
Inner Sunset District
San Francisco, California
Sunset zone 17
USDA zone 10a
21 inches / 530mm annual rainfall, mostly October to April
Humidity averages 60 to 85 percent year-round.
Summer: 67F/55F | 19C/12C
Winter: 56F/44F | 13C/6C
40-year extremes: 96F/26F | 35.5C/-3.8C

#11 santoury

santoury

    Rank: FLOWERING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 1,180 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:MA

Posted 03 May 2011 - 06:23 PM

I think there are two types of plants being discussed as the annual plugs - one has wider leaves (Cordylines including those cultivars), and then there's one that has grass-like long leaves - quite distinct from the other. If somebody else knows what I'm talking about, please chime in.
Best, Jude
  • 0
I write a plant newsletter, if you would like to be added on my e-mail list! Let me know.

#12 Roaringwater

Roaringwater

    Rank: GERMINATING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 83 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:SW Ireland z9b/10a

Posted 10 May 2011 - 01:30 AM

C. indivisa has the most impressive foliage of any Cordyline species, IMO. It is actually slightly hardier than C. australis, but is very vulnerable to attack by phytophthora. Avoid clay soils and seepage areas. Although it comes from mountainous areas, it tolerates salt winds very well. Here is a link to a mature specimen growing at Mount Stewart Gardens, Northern Ireland.

Cordyline indivisa
  • 0
Michael, SW Ireland, cool oceanic climate
16 yr absolute min -3c, 16 yr absolute max +28c
July av. max/min 20/14c, January av. max/min 10/6c

#13 Ray Tampa

Ray Tampa

    Rank: SETTING SEED

  • IPS DIRECTOR
  • 4,907 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Interbay Peninsula of Tampa, Florida, USA and Bokeelia, Florida, USA

Posted 13 May 2011 - 03:26 AM

Real beauties!
  • 0
Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA
subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA
subtropical USDA Zone 10B

#14 Eric in Orlando

Eric in Orlando

    Rank: SETTING SEED

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 5,182 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Orlando, FL, USA

Posted 13 May 2011 - 05:58 AM

I've tried C. banksii and C. indivisia here and neither survive.

Most C. australis die here too.
  • 0
Eric
Orlando, FL
zone 9b/10a

#15 Palm crazy

Palm crazy

    Rank: FLOWERING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 1,474 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington State, z8a 47N.

Posted 13 May 2011 - 08:32 AM

Here is last years link to some of the cordylines I have and most of these are only one/two years in the ground. Cordyline red sensation ( not hardy for me hates wet cold winters) die to the ground this winter but the rest are ok and some will develop trunks this summer.
Click here. http://www.palmtalk....=1

Edited by Palm crazy, 13 May 2011 - 08:37 AM.

  • 0

Last six winter lows… 12F, 15F, 15F, 26F, 25F, 16F. 

 

                                            


#16 Palm crazy

Palm crazy

    Rank: FLOWERING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 1,474 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington State, z8a 47N.

Posted 14 May 2011 - 11:31 AM

Here is this years new one or at least new for me. Easy to fine in Cali but not in Washington state. I got two then someone got the last three. :mrlooney:
Cordyline australis 'Krakatoa' likes to grow in part shade during the hottest weather other wise color bleaches out.
Posted Image
  • 0

Last six winter lows… 12F, 15F, 15F, 26F, 25F, 16F. 

 

                                            


#17 Tropicgardener

Tropicgardener

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 974 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Airlie Beach, Whitsunday Region. Tropical Queensland.

Posted 14 May 2011 - 07:58 PM

Here is this years new one or at least new for me. Easy to fine in Cali but not in Washington state. I got two then someone got the last three. :mrlooney:
Cordyline australis 'Krakatoa' likes to grow in part shade during the hottest weather other wise color bleaches out.
Posted Image

These are gorgeous, the red is stunning.........if only they wouldn't collapse on me in the summer months !!!
  • 0

Andrew,
Airlie Beach, Whitsundays

Tropical Queensland


#18 hydrophyte

hydrophyte

    Rank: SEEDLING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 172 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Sun Prairie, Wisconsin USA

Posted 17 January 2012 - 12:16 AM

I'd like to resurrect this thread. I am interested in tracking down some species Cordyline to try as potted houseplants here in Wisconsin, USA. I can also give plants some indoor protection during our long cold and dry wintertime here.

Can anybody suggest ideas for finding some of these true species such as C. banksii, C. petiolaris, C. indivisia or others for mail order?
  • 0

#19 hydrophyte

hydrophyte

    Rank: SEEDLING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 172 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Sun Prairie, Wisconsin USA

Posted 17 January 2012 - 09:02 AM

Here's the whole list of everything that RarePalmSeeds.com is currently offering...

  • Cordyline australis
  • Cordyline banksii
  • Cordyline dracaenoides
  • Cordyline fruticosa (= C. terminalis)
  • Cordyline indivisa
  • Cordyline mauritiana
  • Cordyline neocaledonica
  • Cordyline petiolaris
  • Cordyline pumilio
  • Cordyline sp. (Cyclops)
  • Cordyline sp. (Wide Leaf)
  • Cordyline stricta

I'd be interested in any observations or thoughts on germinating and growing any of these.
  • 0

#20 Palm crazy

Palm crazy

    Rank: FLOWERING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 1,474 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington State, z8a 47N.

Posted 17 January 2012 - 12:47 PM

I'd like to resurrect this thread. I am interested in tracking down some species Cordyline to try as potted houseplants here in Wisconsin, USA. I can also give plants some indoor protection during our long cold and dry wintertime here.

Can anybody suggest ideas for finding some of these true species such as C. banksii, C. petiolaris, C. indivisia or others for mail order?



Fry Road Nursery does mail order, they have a few nice colorful hybrids. Their shipping is pretty high! They have a lot Heat and Cool loving tropicals you might like to, check them out. (Wholesale / Retail)

http://www.storesonl..._4920=cordyline

Edited by Palm crazy, 17 January 2012 - 12:48 PM.

  • 0

Last six winter lows… 12F, 15F, 15F, 26F, 25F, 16F. 

 

                                            


#21 hydrophyte

hydrophyte

    Rank: SEEDLING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 172 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Sun Prairie, Wisconsin USA

Posted 17 January 2012 - 12:57 PM

Thanks! They do have some nice stuff. Like I said I am hunting for species plants.
  • 0

#22 Tropicgardener

Tropicgardener

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 974 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Airlie Beach, Whitsunday Region. Tropical Queensland.

Posted 17 January 2012 - 08:17 PM

Here's the whole list of everything that RarePalmSeeds.com is currently offering...

  • Cordyline australis
  • Cordyline banksii
  • Cordyline dracaenoides
  • Cordyline fruticosa (= C. terminalis)
  • Cordyline indivisa
  • Cordyline mauritiana
  • Cordyline neocaledonica
  • Cordyline petiolaris
  • Cordyline pumilio
  • Cordyline sp. (Cyclops)
  • Cordyline sp. (Wide Leaf)
  • Cordyline stricta

I'd be interested in any observations or thoughts on germinating and growing any of these.

Cordyline stricta and Cordyline petiolaris are both Australian native Cordylines that occur naturally in the subtropical rainforests of Queensland and northern New South Wales. They are both easy species to propagate and grow and will grow in just about any soil as long as it is well drained. Seed strikes very easily and has quite long viability. Cordyline petiolaris is one of my favourite Australian Natives, but can only be grown successfully by seed or by tuber cuttings.....it doesn't strike well from cuttings.
  • 0

Andrew,
Airlie Beach, Whitsundays

Tropical Queensland


#23 hydrophyte

hydrophyte

    Rank: SEEDLING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 172 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Sun Prairie, Wisconsin USA

Posted 18 January 2012 - 09:29 AM

Hey thank you so much!

I hope that I can track down some seed.
  • 0

#24 JasonD

JasonD

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 915 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, California

Posted 03 March 2012 - 11:42 PM

Here's the whole list of everything that RarePalmSeeds.com is currently offering...

  • Cordyline australis - easy to germinate; try 50-75F
  • Cordyline banksii - also easy, same temp range. Beautiful broad leaves arranged in clear spirals in the crown. Branches.
  • Cordyline dracaenoides
  • Cordyline fruticosa (= C. terminalis)
  • Cordyline indivisa - I'd suggest cooler temps, 40-70F; protect from heat
  • Cordyline mauritiana
  • Cordyline neocaledonica
  • Cordyline petiolaris
  • Cordyline pumilio - A grassy species, tough, minimal trunking
  • Cordyline sp. (Cyclops)
  • Cordyline sp. (Wide Leaf)
  • Cordyline stricta - easy to grow indoors but gets mealybug. Pretty purple flowers. Thicketing, each stem is slender with dainty leaves. Almost like a large Miscanthus.

I'd be interested in any observations or thoughts on germinating and growing any of these.


  • 0
Jason Dewees
Inner Sunset District
San Francisco, California
Sunset zone 17
USDA zone 10a
21 inches / 530mm annual rainfall, mostly October to April
Humidity averages 60 to 85 percent year-round.
Summer: 67F/55F | 19C/12C
Winter: 56F/44F | 13C/6C
40-year extremes: 96F/26F | 35.5C/-3.8C

#25 DavePoole

DavePoole

    Rank: GERMINATING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 51 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 16 March 2012 - 08:42 AM

Cordylines seems to do quite well in our cool, humid climate and C. indivisa is something of a star performer albeit slower than australis, banksii and stricta. I grew mine from seed some years ago and this one was seriously neglected for 2 years or so. Despite being dried out, frozen solid and generally kicked about, it immediately responded to a bit of TLC and is now developing into a very handsome plant with a thick, 30" trunk. This was taken back in January just as it was resuming growth. A new offset has appeared in the past 12 months so with a bit of luck it will eventually become a multi-trunked specimen.

Posted Image

And 12 months earlier:

Posted Image
  • 0
Coastal South Devon,  England

#26 Tropicgardener

Tropicgardener

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 974 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Airlie Beach, Whitsunday Region. Tropical Queensland.

Posted 16 March 2012 - 06:54 PM

Cordylines seems to do quite well in our cool, humid climate and C. indivisa is something of a star performer albeit slower than australis, banksii and stricta. I grew mine from seed some years ago and this one was seriously neglected for 2 years or so. Despite being dried out, frozen solid and generally kicked about, it immediately responded to a bit of TLC and is now developing into a very handsome plant with a thick, 30" trunk. This was taken back in January just as it was resuming growth. A new offset has appeared in the past 12 months so with a bit of luck it will eventually become a multi-trunked specimen.

Posted Image

And 12 months earlier:

Posted Image

Nice Photos there Dave, I have seen the cool climate New Zealand Cordylines growing in gardens featured on the British show 'Escape to the Country'. They are obviously quite cold tolerant.....they don't do any good here though, they survive ok in the winter but the tropical humid summers knock them over.
  • 0

Andrew,
Airlie Beach, Whitsundays

Tropical Queensland


#27 JasonD

JasonD

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 915 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, California

Posted 19 March 2012 - 11:09 PM

That's the biggest indivisa I've ever seen in cultivation! Congratulations.
  • 0
Jason Dewees
Inner Sunset District
San Francisco, California
Sunset zone 17
USDA zone 10a
21 inches / 530mm annual rainfall, mostly October to April
Humidity averages 60 to 85 percent year-round.
Summer: 67F/55F | 19C/12C
Winter: 56F/44F | 13C/6C
40-year extremes: 96F/26F | 35.5C/-3.8C




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users