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what would be a fantastic tree to grow in california that you never see anywhere ?

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the title says it all...........

Edited by trioderob
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A hybrid. Cannabis sativa X Metasequoia glyptostroboides

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kigelia pinnata

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kigelia pinnata

Nice choice.

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kigelia pinnata

Nice choice.

except that those big salami would killl somebody.

what about some of the Baobab trees

i never see any of them around town here....

also are there any adult Eucalyptus deglupta around southern cal ?

I have seen them for sale here and it would be cool to see what they look like as an adult

hillshaveeyes1977.jpg

Edited by trioderob
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Mardy Darians big deglupta is alive and big...

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Royal poinciana.

In their glory, not the insipid specimens we see here.

(Okay, prove me wrong!)

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Royal poinciana.

In their glory, not the insipid specimens we see here.

(Okay, prove me wrong!)

Delonix regia, Tafola St, Placentia, circa early '90s:

Delonix--Placentia.jpg

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Robinsonella cordata:

Robinsonella1_small.jpg

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Cassia angolensis:

Cas_ang4.jpg

Cas_ang1.jpg

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Cassia grandis:

Cas_gra3-1.jpg

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the Robinsonella cordata is very interesting

looked it up online and they say it grows at 6500 feet in southern mexico

that would be almost the same climate as san diego

:unsure:

Edited by trioderob
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My, two beautiful trees - Delonix regia and the Cassia grandis.

I love the colour on both of them!

I shall look both of these up. Thanks for posting same.

kpl

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Juanolloa_mexicana_250w.jpg

How about Juanolloa mexicana.

Edited by Palm crazy
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Sports Arena Street View

There are Euc. deglupta around. Probably the largest are the ones out front of the Sports Arena. They're so so as far as bark coloration goes. Better at certain times of the year than others. They're avenue trees so they get no water or fertilization to help expand the trunks and peel bark.

The ones at the entrance of the SD Zoo are better looking.

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matt-

I will check out the ones at the zoo.

thanks

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Toona ciliata ( formerly australis)

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Marula tree.Google it or youtube it.

Best regards

Tyrone

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Sports Arena Street View

There are Euc. deglupta around. Probably the largest are the ones out front of the Sports Arena. They're so so as far as bark coloration goes. Better at certain times of the year than others. They're avenue trees so they get no water or fertilization to help expand the trunks and peel bark.

The ones at the entrance of the SD Zoo are better looking.

I really have my doubts these are the same type of Euc's going around FL as Deglupta. The ones I got from FL breeze through winter, have shinny leaflets, and have a slightly different look. The ones I got from you are not shinny, browned in winter and just grows different even in pots. Gary told me he thinks the ones at the SA are not even Deglupta. Not sure I agree, but I think they are maybe ones from a different islands.

What do you think? You have both right?

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Yes Len, I have a 10 footer that I got several years ago from Eucalyptusdeglupta.com. The batch that I germinated from seed were procured from John in Andalucia. From what I've seen, they are the same tree.

I do agree that the Sports Arena trees are lackluster in appearance, but from what I've seen of the trunk, leaves, and collected seed pods (no germination though), they appear to be E. deglupta to me, but I'm no expert. The Zoo trees are much prettier and I believe these are E. deglupta as well.

Like I've said before, the ones from Florida (eucalyptusdeglupta.com) had that matte coating on the young leaves as well but have since turned nice and glossy. The Florida tree's leaves browned in it's first Winter too. Maybe because it was close to the ground, in the canyon.

I'll keep a closer eye out for differences from now on. You've got an eye for that suff Len, but I'm just not seeing it yet.

If anyone has any pics of the plants that I've sold, from John's seed, I'd love to see them. I planted one right next to my florida tree so comparison will be easy. My neighbor planted a small 1 gallon I gave him and it's at least 4 feet tall just a few months later. What a difference planting these things make.

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What about growing KOA (Acacia koa ) in Califonia.

the lumber is worth $$$$$

Woods-Body-Koa.jpg

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is that a question or a statement or both?

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is that a question or a statement or both?

its a statement formed as a question

or vise versa.

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so its neither.this is definitely a statement.

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Acacia koa is easily grown in CA; even northern CA. But it's pretty non-descript looking. Sort of looks like a lot of Eucalyptus around here. Certainly not highly ornamental in my opinion. Plus, I don't think it'll get that orange bark coloration here because from what I remember, that's a type of moss that grows on it at certain elevations in HI.

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what about all the money you can make from it.

:floor:

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Well there is that. I heard that at certain elevations instead of bearing seed pods, it doesn't. You thought I was gonna say something else, huh?

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no i thought you'd say something meaningful & romantic. :wub:

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One tree that grows beautifully in SoCal, but which is seen rarely, is Acacia xanthophloea. There are stunning examples at the Wild Animal Park. A truly beautiful trunk and crown and oh so African!

Also, Cassia fistula grows very well a few miles inland in Southern California if you can give it a full sun position, hopefully with reflected heat or up against a south-facing wall. In addition to Cassia nodosa and the others mentioned above (wow, love that C. angolensis, Fastfeat!), there is C. afrofistula, which will probably do well in SoCal if you can give it some heat; and maybe Cassia roxburghii (marginata) and C. brewsteri from Queensland. Cassia bakeriana is stunning and grows at slightly higher elevations and I think would do very well in the cooler climate of coastal California.

Also, Peltophorum dubium if you have the room! There's a gorgeous huge specimen at the Huntington.

Add to that Harpullia, Castanospermum, and some of the fantastic unusual Erythrinas such as E. latissima. Acrocarpus fraxinifolius is another nice flowering tree that is very rarely seen, yet grows very nicely in Southern California, even right next to the beach in Santa Monica.

Talauma hodgsonii is a stunner but good luck ever finding one. Virtually impossible to propagate. I think Evans & Reeves was the only nursery able to do it, and that was many, many years ago. Other unusual Magnoliaceae are available sparingly, lots of former Michelias (now Magnolia) such as M. insignis and M. chapensis (both gorgeous) and many others.

Also, aside from Delonix regia, which is very marginal (the successful specimens are exceptions rather than rules!) what about Delonix elata? This is another beauty, not as overtly showy as its brother but certainly much more unusual and I think also a much easier grow in SoCal. Others here can confirm or deny that supposition...

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I agree that Acacia xanthophloea is a beautiful tree. I've grown many from seed and just germinated my first batch from my own tree. The yellow powdery bark is amazing! They are not usually very popular with home gardeners due to the numerous vicious spines. It seems like this tree has more spines than leaves sometimes.

A couple of other seldome seen Acacia favorites of mine are Acacia podalyriifolia and Acacia dealbata.

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Matt--

You need to start distributing those little Fever Trees, maybe do some rogue planting in an abandoned or wild spot here or there so people can see them in conspicuous places...imagine how you could transform S.D.'s landscape if these could be seen growing without any help, become popular and get into the trade. What a great alternative to Eucalyptus and Melaleuca! Spines don't seem to deter people from planting Bougainvillea, Agave americana, roses, Phoenix, Washingtonia, etc. While this species naturally grows in damper spots in nature, I think it does fine in typical drier SoCal garden conditions. I still don't understand why the planting of allelopathic, firebomb Eucalyptus has continued when there are other trees such as the many African acacias that will grow in S.D.'s very dry climate. The Wild Animal Park has done a commendable job by planting these beautiful things in very appropriate and attractive settings, but I don't think they usually sell them in their little nursery-store, do they?

Aside from the SD Wild Animal Park, there used to be (probably still are) a few interesting flat-topped Acacias in the African section at the Arboretum in Arcadia. I remember A. sieberiana v. woodii there...beautiful! That's a very different-looking tree than A. xanthophloea with a great flat top that would make an excellent addition to the landscape as well.

Plantzafrica profiles of both of the above trees:

Acacia xanthophloea

Acacia sieberiana v. woodii

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Michael,

I acquired my first seed batch of A. xanthophloea seed on ebay from a bonsaii dealer, about 4 years ago. It was the only place I could find them. I grew them up, planted 2 out, and sold and gave away the rest. Then I discovered this tree growing in my neighborhood Google street view and I collected the seed from it. The owner originally got the seed from the Wild Animal Park many years ago. Now my own tree is seeding and I just saw the first sprouts of germinated seed last week, so it'll be a while before they are ready. I planted my A. xanthophloea up on my rocky, south facing ridge, thinking that it would do good but they struggle with the dry conditions, at least when they're young. They are getting better and I only had to water once every 2-3 weeks last Summer in order for them to keep their leaves. Hopefully this Summer I'll only have to water a couple of times deeply. There is not much top soil here so that doesn't help.

The most amazing drought tolerant Acacia I'm growing is A. podalyriifolia. It needs absolutely no water, even in Summer, even planted in rocky soil. It's awesome! Here's a long shot of it across the canyon. It's about 10 feet tall and 8 feet wide. It seems to glow powdery blue and when it blooms it's entirely yellow puff balls everywhere.

post-126-028301400 1297269087_thumb.jpg

I found this at a local nursery and snatched it up quickly because I'd never seen one before. I had collected seed several years before off of a tree in the Water Conservation Garden in Rancho SD, but they are super slow and picky when tiny sprouts. It took several years just to get them up to 6" pots. Then finally they start to grow strong. I sold those, but I have more seeds germinating from my tree now.

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how about growing a Rosewood tree such as "Dalbergia Nigra".

we may be too SEMI tropical to grow it but I am not sure

could make some major $$$$$ if it grows.

pohonkelapa - comments ?

tacamaz03.jpg

Edited by trioderob
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nothing now.i'll let ya know if anything comes to mind.

please continue,this is fascinating.

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What about Chiranthodendron pentadactylon (Devil's Hand Tree)? I have one growing in Florida. It thrives during this time of the year and then struggles through the summer. It seems to be happiest with temps ranging from 40 to 75deg.

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Now that is awesome!

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Matt--

Agree about Acacia podalyriifolia being practically carefree. But I would caution against using it near open expanses of SoCal coastal sage scrub. It volunteers rather aggressively (at least it did in Laguna Hills), especially if pods get washed/carried into ground squirrel holes. Not particularly hard to remove, but larger trees can generate large volume of seed. And once established, people may be slow to remove the invader "'cause it's such a pretty blue color..."

Of course, Northern California residents can relate to similar escape experiences with A. decurrens/A. dealbata there...

Edited by fastfeat
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Sports Arena Street View

There are Euc. deglupta around. Probably the largest are the ones out front of the Sports Arena. They're so so as far as bark coloration goes. Better at certain times of the year than others. They're avenue trees so they get no water or fertilization to help expand the trunks and peel bark.

The ones at the entrance of the SD Zoo are better looking.

I really have my doubts these are the same type of Euc's going around FL as Deglupta. The ones I got from FL breeze through winter, have shinny leaflets, and have a slightly different look. The ones I got from you are not shinny, browned in winter and just grows different even in pots. Gary told me he thinks the ones at the SA are not even Deglupta. Not sure I agree, but I think they are maybe ones from a different islands.

What do you think? You have both right?

Sports Arena trees are definitely E. deglupta. (I grew my trees at my Loxahatchee nursery from their seed.) Likely that dryish soil, regular onshore buffeting, and lower number of degree days (compared to SoFla) all contribute to keeping a comparative lid on CA trees. That a New Guinea native (USDA Zone 12, rainfall over 100"/yr) grows fairly well under typical SoCal conditions is really nothing short of remarkable, IMHO.

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Matt--

Agree about Acacia podalyriifolia being practically carefree. But I would caution against using it near open expanses of SoCal coastal sage scrub. It volunteers rather aggressively (at least it did in Laguna Hills), especially if pods get washed/carried into ground squirrel holes. Not particularly hard to remove, but larger trees can generate large volume of seed. And once established, people may be slow to remove the invader "'cause it's such a pretty blue color..."

Of course, Northern California residents can relate to similar escape experiences with A. decurrens/A. dealbata there...

Thanks for the heads up. I didn't think about that. Luckily my property and the 9 acres below are at the downslope and neighborhood/city side of the expanse of sage habitat that sits above us on the hill. I'll keep an eye on it in the years to come; especially if there's a fire. These things love to germinate immediately after being boiled or scarified. It's amazing.

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Sports Arena Street View

There are Euc. deglupta around. Probably the largest are the ones out front of the Sports Arena. They're so so as far as bark coloration goes. Better at certain times of the year than others. They're avenue trees so they get no water or fertilization to help expand the trunks and peel bark.

The ones at the entrance of the SD Zoo are better looking.

I really have my doubts these are the same type of Euc's going around FL as Deglupta. The ones I got from FL breeze through winter, have shinny leaflets, and have a slightly different look. The ones I got from you are not shinny, browned in winter and just grows different even in pots. Gary told me he thinks the ones at the SA are not even Deglupta. Not sure I agree, but I think they are maybe ones from a different islands.

What do you think? You have both right?

Sports Arena trees are definitely E. deglupta. (I grew my trees at my Loxahatchee nursery from their seed.) Likely that dryish soil, regular onshore buffeting, and lower number of degree days (compared to SoFla) all contribute to keeping a comparative lid on CA trees. That a New Guinea native (USDA Zone 12, rainfall over 100"/yr) grows fairly well under typical SoCal conditions is really nothing short of remarkable, IMHO.

Ken, these are actually spread across Guinea and Indonesia and Philippines (import long ago). Maybe there is some variation amounst them? Not sure but the two I have from SA and the one from FL look and grow different. Gary has noticed the same thing.

I agree maybe the neglect at SA is what makes them not look as nice also.

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