Jump to content


RarePalmSeeds

Photo

Trunk splitting of foxtail palms


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Walt

Walt

    Rank: FLOWERING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 1,998 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lake Placid, Fla.

Posted 15 December 2010 - 09:05 AM

A buddy of mine (we are both master gardners at our county extension office) has a neighbor across the street from him with a grouping of foxtail palms, and asked him for advice concerning the palms.

Two of the palms have severe splits in their trunks. The other two or three (not sure of exact count) trunks are fine (no splits).

I only know the palms were planted about one year ago and had no splits at the time. I also know the owner has an irrigation system. Also, being lakefront property, the water table is high where roots could sink into lots of water for uptake).

I've seen root splitting before, as I have many Archontophoenix cunninghamia palms with split/fissured trunks, but have never seen trunks with such damaging splits as the ones shown in the below photos (or that Cocos nucifera in a related post I just replied to).

Anyone (Aussies?) had a similar experience with Wodyetia bifurcata? What is you opinion, conclusions, etc.? My buddy would like to aprise the palm owner as to the possible causes of the splitting. Also, should the trunk be treated with any kind of fungicide or other corrective actions?

The below three photos were taken this morning (12-15-10). There's been no freezes lakeside, so I'm ruling that out as a cause.

Posted Image


Posted Image


Posted Image
  • 0
Mad about palms

PalmTalk Advertising

#2 MattyB

MattyB

    Rank: SETTING SEED

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 17,355 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spring Valley, CA (San Diego County)

Posted 15 December 2010 - 09:32 AM

Walt,
It's because the palms already had woody trunk when they were planted. You're right, they are finding lots of water and they are happy to fatten up. So happy that they are splitting their britches. It's best not to buy skinny, woody trunked palms if they are a robust species.
  • 0
Matt Bradford
"Manambe Lavaka"
Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)
10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)
9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

#3 Patrick

Patrick

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 959 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Oakley, California.

Posted 15 December 2010 - 09:37 AM

I'm by far no master gardener, but I have a guess.... :hmm:
I haven't dealt with foxtails too much as it gets just a tad too cold here. I looked where you're at and It looks like you're in a pretty nice area of the state as far as south (warmth) goes. If it's never frozen there at the lake then that can't be the issue.

But what's got my wheels spinning is the fact that you said the guy has only had these in the ground for a year. Where did they come from before that, and could this possibly be cold damage showing up way after the fact. Were they dug up from a location in northern Fla.? It got pretty cold up there last year didn't it?

That's my two cents, but I'm not ruling out some other reason by any means.


Edit: I like Matt's answer better :D
  • 0
Oakley, California
55 Miles E-NE of San Francisco, CA
Solid zone 9, I can expect at least one night in the mid to low twenties every year.
Hot, dry summers. Cold, wet winters.

#4 Palmlover

Palmlover

    Rank: JUVENILE

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 427 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Huntington Beach, CA. Zone 10a

Posted 23 December 2010 - 10:21 PM

Walt,
It's because the palms already had woody trunk when they were planted. You're right, they are finding lots of water and they are happy to fatten up. So happy that they are splitting their britches. It's best not to buy skinny, woody trunked palms if they are a robust species.



Matt,

What will eventually happen to the palm as it splits? Will it die or grow a new layer eventually?
  • 0

#5 Mark Heath

Mark Heath

    Rank: FLOWERING

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 1,811 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Orlando, Florida

Posted 24 December 2010 - 01:46 AM


Walt,
It's because the palms already had woody trunk when they were planted. You're right, they are finding lots of water and they are happy to fatten up. So happy that they are splitting their britches. It's best not to buy skinny, woody trunked palms if they are a robust species.



Matt,

What will eventually happen to the palm as it splits? Will it die or grow a new layer eventually?


I had the same thing happen to me about 5 years ago. The Foxtail seemed to allmost heal itself, but it was wiped out by last years freeze so i cannot supply a pic.
  • 0
Orlando, Florida
zone 9b
The Pollen Poacher!!
GO DOLPHINS!!
GO GATORS!!!

Palms, Sex, Money and horsepower,,,, you may have more than you can handle,,
but too much is never enough!!

#6 MattyB

MattyB

    Rank: SETTING SEED

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 17,355 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spring Valley, CA (San Diego County)

Posted 24 December 2010 - 08:59 AM


Walt,
It's because the palms already had woody trunk when they were planted. You're right, they are finding lots of water and they are happy to fatten up. So happy that they are splitting their britches. It's best not to buy skinny, woody trunked palms if they are a robust species.



Matt,

What will eventually happen to the palm as it splits? Will it die or grow a new layer eventually?


Any one of those things could happen. Sometimes the crack is an invitation for pink rot to set in and eventually rot the whole plant out. The less severe cracks tend to pretty much heal up as the palm continues to expand from within. Sometimes the larger cracks rot away a bit to leave a crevas and the palm still lives on doing fine.
  • 0
Matt Bradford
"Manambe Lavaka"
Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)
10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)
9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

#7 Alan_Tampa

Alan_Tampa

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 854 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tampa, Fl

Posted 24 December 2010 - 09:18 AM

looks like mechanical damage to me, from installation maybe. May have just looked like a scrape or blemish early on.



Alan
  • 0
Tampa, Florida
Zone - 10a

#8 Moose

Moose

    Rank: SETTING SEED

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 5,243 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Coral Gables, FL

Posted 24 December 2010 - 09:22 AM

looks like mechanical damage to me, from installation maybe. May have just looked like a scrape or blemish early on.



Alan


They were using this device ? ? ? palmscrapertransportation device.jpg
  • 0
Coral Gables, FL 8 miles North of Fairchild USDA Zone 10B

#9 MattyB

MattyB

    Rank: SETTING SEED

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 17,355 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spring Valley, CA (San Diego County)

Posted 24 December 2010 - 09:25 AM

PTD, Palm Torture Device, from the middle ages.
  • 0
Matt Bradford
"Manambe Lavaka"
Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)
10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)
9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

#10 aussiearoids

aussiearoids

    Rank: SETTING SEED

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 2,889 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tropical Qld

Posted 24 December 2010 - 03:15 PM

cover up the split with a nice epiphyte like this antplant
or even better an Elkfern

Attached Thumbnails

  • IMG_0206.JPG

  • 0
Michael in palm paradise,
Tully, wet tropics in Australia, over 4 meters of rain every year.
Home of the Golden Gumboot, its over 8m high , our record annual rainfall.

#11 DoomsDave

DoomsDave

    Dave of the Dead

  • IPS DIRECTOR
  • 21,629 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:La Habra, California, USA

Posted 24 December 2010 - 04:59 PM

Yeah, I too, concur with Matty.

Sometimes cracked palms have problems, but, in my experience, in a good environment, the plant will generate new tissue to at least partially fill in a crack.

Those are really nice Woodies, by the way.

Keep us apprized. What happens, one way or another, will inform all of us.
  • 0

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users