Can you root up the top of a Queen palm?

48 posts in this topic

A little over a month ago my dad cut down a Queen palm (Syagrus romanzoffiana?). He had it cut into four foot sections. I was curious to see if I could root up the top if I just stuck it in the ground. So I did. It's been in the ground now for about a month, and it's actually put out new growth -- but pretty pitiful new growth. I'll take a picture of it.

Seriously I doubt that I'll be able to root it. But are there palms that you can root this way? I know that cycads, and some tree ferns will -- but they're totally different.

Edited by Kostas
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It's like a chicken that just had it's head cut off. Yeah, it will run around for a while but it's a goner.

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Good analogy Terry. :lol: I wonder if you wounded the trunk, put moss around it to encourage adventitious roots to form up high on the trunk, and then cut it and stuck it in the ground, if it would go.

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At a jobsite i was working on some years ago, the owners had a large queen they removed and left on its side in the backyard for months, they had some bobcat work done and the driver basically used the palm as speed bump instead of moving it to the side. The owners asked me to dispose of it, so I took it to a friends house to plant it, he is a sucker for anything free. Four years later "Flaca" as he calls her has grown well and produced fruit, even with flattened trunk.

You never know, P. reclinata start fairly easy from cutting.

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One of the very first palm tales I read was about a village in India. Once a coconut palm reached a certain height they would send up a climber to about 6 ft below the crown. He'd use a machete to open large cuts around the stem, place a basket of old leaves, etc. over the cuts, then wait. I forget the exact time want to say 6 months or so. Eventually a root ball would form inside the basket. Then the villagers would tie rope to the crown and pull the top of the palm down, re-plant and no more climbing - for awhile anyway. They did this “air layering” process over & over with continued success. Not sure this is applicable to all palm genera but any prone to forming adventitious roots are worth a go. And Syagrus is where Cocos diverged from all those millions of yrs ago ...

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Uh, didn't they know that the coconuts made new palms? :blink:

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the point was they didnt have to climb so high by cutting em. :winkie:

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To answer the question. No you can not cut a palm in half and have it just start growing again.

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And Pam's husband wouldn't like that either.

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wheres yer earthy/pithy analogy len? terry had a good one.we expect more from you. :angry:

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If you are Australian the title of this thread has a whole different meaning. So to answer the question from a down under perspective, yes it is possible but not recommended as you would have difficulty finding a willing partner and you might fall out.

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:floor:

now i see why there are so many aussies here--they get a totally DIFFERENT meaning to every topic! :P

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I think that India anecdote was in reference to cocunuts that were exeptional producers. They wanted to be able to harvest with ease and maintain the good 'uns.

Alan

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If you are Australian the title of this thread has a whole different meaning. So to answer the question from a down under perspective, yes it is possible but not recommended as you would have difficulty finding a willing partner and you might fall out.

I'm a Kiwi , But being here for over 24 years, so i see me as a Aussie

just can't work this out, cut a palm to get another... Hmmm perharps

the writer meant by pulling the palm down a new palm grew.

Well just started from a lower point after getting pulled down....

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A little over a month ago my dad cut down a Queen palm (Syagrus romanzoffiana?). He had it cut into four foot sections. I was curious to see if I could root up the top if I just stuck it in the ground. So I did. It's been in the ground now for about a month, and it's actually put out new growth -- but pretty pitiful new growth. I'll take a picture of it.

Seriously I doubt that I'll be able to root it. But are there palms that you can root this way? I know that cycads, and some tree ferns will -- but they're totally different.

ordinarily, I agree with the naysayers, but there are times when wierd [fecal material] happens.

Don't give up on your palm top yet.

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If you are Australian the title of this thread has a whole different meaning. So to answer the question from a down under perspective, yes it is possible but not recommended as you would have difficulty finding a willing partner and you might fall out.

Yeah, but if I could get her up in the palm tree -- and even if we did fall -- it would be a very memorable experience! :blush:

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There is a very interesting thread on Palmpedia about a tall multiple headed Queen Palm that had the top broken off near the heads. The poster put it in a pot and it rooted. Here is one pic before it snapped off, and one as it lay on the ground. The potting and re-rooting is well documented with more pics and commentary HERE

post-11-077281900 1292107125_thumb.jpg

post-11-028778700 1292107132_thumb.jpg

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Possums do as do flying foxes and quite possibly carpet snakes. I had a snake once which was good at mathematics, it was sum adder.

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There is a very interesting thread on Palmpedia about a tall multiple headed Queen Palm that had the top broken off near the heads. The poster put it in a pot and it rooted. Here is one pic before it snapped off, and one as it lay on the ground. The potting and re-rooting is well documented with more pics and commentary HERE

I'll take a picture of mine tomorrow. I was just looking at it today and I think that it is going to make it. Some of the new growth is pretty green. It appears that you can root one from a cutting.

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Possums do as do flying foxes and quite possibly carpet snakes. I had a snake once which was good at mathematics, it was sum adder.

I caught this character stealing cat food..

2931093980066947068S600x600Q85.jpg

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Okay here's are some pictures of my planted Queen palm cutting. It's getting even more new growth. Look closely and you'll see the new spear coming up. Good grief these queen palms are ridiculously bulletproof!

post-4899-053139000 1292169750_thumb.jpg

post-4899-073505700 1292169768_thumb.jpg

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Fascinating thread - especially the link to the multi-headed queen that was dropping rooting chunks.

Queens are pretty tough. I have large potted specimen (a few inches of trunk) that was creeping up out of the pot. I took it out, cut off the bottom third of the roots with a hacksaw, and repotted it. It never missed a beat.

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With the weather we are having, that thing might have a go!!

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A little over a month ago my dad cut down a Queen palm (Syagrus romanzoffiana?). He had it cut into four foot sections. I was curious to see if I could root up the top if I just stuck it in the ground. So I did. It's been in the ground now for about a month, and it's actually put out new growth -- but pretty pitiful new growth. I'll take a picture of it.

Seriously I doubt that I'll be able to root it. But are there palms that you can root this way? I know that cycads, and some tree ferns will -- but they're totally different.

It's worth a try. I wish I had tried it with the head of my Jubaea when it fell over. It appeared everything above the rotten spot on the trunk was still alive and healthy, but I assumed it wouldn't work. Now I still wonder from time to time what would have happened if I had cut off the rotten part, painted the bottom with rooting hormone, and planted it. Let us know if it works.

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Dean, that link to the palmpedia discussion seems like something out of ripley's believe it or not. :)

I have seen a huge clump of d. Lutescens where an old specimen fallen over due to the wind has been growing horizontally with a new bunch of roots mid way up the stem. unfortunately the clump is inside a navy compound and photography nmot allowed.

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Right now botanist are laughing at us.

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Miracles happen! Many years ago my uncle in central FL had most of a row of queens broken off by hurricane Donna. When the eye passed and the wind shifted some of them went back upright, severed from there former bases and re-rooted and grew. He said that in his sandy, saturated soil some of those tops were blown about until nearly ten feet of the top part of the trunk was buried, and several of them re-rooted and grew. I saw the evidence with my own eyes!

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Interesting. Queens are indeed tough and 99.9% of palms couldn't perform this trick. Correct if I'm wrong but aren't palms glorified relatives of the grass family?

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Dean et al:

We have a multi-headed queen in my hood in La Habra, need to go and find it . . . .

dave

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My impression is that quite a few palms could be subjected to this treatment and rooted further up the trunk. Has anyone tried it on a crownshaft?

Best Wishes,

merrill

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My apologies:

I should have said has any one tried it on the trunk of a crownshafted palm

Best Wishes,

merrill

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Interestingly enough my headless chicken is still hanging in there. It's been almost five months since the original queen palm was cut down. It has grown slightly but it doesn't look much different than it did in the picture I posted earlier. I guess I could take another picture.

I'm going to leave it and see if eventually takes hold and really starts to grow. Then I'll probably dig it out to see how it rooted. I actually want to grow something else there.

I wonder if it helped that my dad left it to "cure" in the sun next to the garbage cans for over a week. Maybe that helped form a callus or something and helped it root and grow.

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Cryosophila trunks can be cut into sections and planted. Each section will grow new roots and a crown....so it is possible with some palms.

Over here, Queen palms can be run over with the lawnmover many times and still be alive years later...tough palms!

regards,

Daryl

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Possums do as do flying foxes and quite possibly carpet snakes. I had a snake once which was good at mathematics, it was sum adder.

I caught this character stealing cat food..

2931093980066947068S600x600Q85.jpg

I think thats Peachy's dog!

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Cryosophila trunks can be cut into sections and planted. Each section will grow new roots and a crown....so it is possible with some palms.

Over here, Queen palms can be run over with the lawnmover many times and still be alive years later...tough palms!

regards,

Daryl

Possibly because the spines which cover the entire trunk are modified roots. Have you actually seen this done Daryl?

cheers

Richard

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Interestingly enough my headless chicken is still hanging in there. It's been almost five months since the original queen palm was cut down. It has grown slightly but it doesn't look much different than it did in the picture I posted earlier. I guess I could take another picture.

I'm going to leave it and see if eventually takes hold and really starts to grow. Then I'll probably dig it out to see how it rooted. I actually want to grow something else there.

I wonder if it helped that my dad left it to "cure" in the sun next to the garbage cans for over a week. Maybe that helped form a callus or something and helped it root and grow.

Is this palm still hanging in there?

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Interesting. Queens are indeed tough and 99.9% of palms couldn't perform this trick. Correct if I'm wrong but aren't palms glorified relatives of the grass family?

Different families: grass = Poaceae, palms = Arecaceae. Both are monocots, though.

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I'm curious to know, too.

How about it, RP?

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If you are Australian the title of this thread has a whole different meaning. So to answer the question from a down under perspective, yes it is possible but not recommended as you would have difficulty finding a willing partner and you might fall out.

I'm a Kiwi , But being here for over 24 years, so i see me as a Aussie

just can't work this out, cut a palm to get another... Hmmm perharps

the writer meant by pulling the palm down a new palm grew.

Well just started from a lower point after getting pulled down....

I'm with you; I'm Aussie but I can't work this out either...

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I broke a C. tepejilote while repotting it, so I potted up the top part and voila , it grew!! I tried it again with a C. metallica and same thing happened. It can be done .... so there.

Peachy

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