Jump to content


RarePalmSeeds

Photo

Can you root up the top of a Queen palm?

Cold Hardy

  • Please log in to reply
47 replies to this topic

#1 rprimbs

rprimbs

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 598 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Escondido, California

Posted 09 December 2010 - 06:25 PM

A little over a month ago my dad cut down a Queen palm (Syagrus romanzoffiana?). He had it cut into four foot sections. I was curious to see if I could root up the top if I just stuck it in the ground. So I did. It's been in the ground now for about a month, and it's actually put out new growth -- but pretty pitiful new growth. I'll take a picture of it.

Seriously I doubt that I'll be able to root it. But are there palms that you can root this way? I know that cycads, and some tree ferns will -- but they're totally different.


Edited by Kostas, 14 June 2013 - 03:09 PM.

  • 0

PalmTalk Advertising

#2 osideterry

osideterry

    Rank: SETTING SEED

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 3,511 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Oceanside, California

Posted 09 December 2010 - 09:22 PM

It's like a chicken that just had it's head cut off. Yeah, it will run around for a while but it's a goner.
  • 0
Zone 9b/10a, Sunset Zone 22
7 miles inland. Elevation 120ft (37m)
Average annual low temp: 30F (-1C)
Average annual rainfall: 8" (20cm)

#3 MattyB

MattyB

    Rank: SETTING SEED

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 17,307 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spring Valley, CA (San Diego County)

Posted 10 December 2010 - 09:05 AM

Good analogy Terry. :lol: I wonder if you wounded the trunk, put moss around it to encourage adventitious roots to form up high on the trunk, and then cut it and stuck it in the ground, if it would go.
  • 0
Matt Bradford
"Manambe Lavaka"
Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)
10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)
9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

#4 carver

carver

    Rank: JUVENILE

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 324 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:St. Petersburg, Fl.

Posted 10 December 2010 - 09:22 AM

At a jobsite i was working on some years ago, the owners had a large queen they removed and left on its side in the backyard for months, they had some bobcat work done and the driver basically used the palm as speed bump instead of moving it to the side. The owners asked me to dispose of it, so I took it to a friends house to plant it, he is a sucker for anything free. Four years later "Flaca" as he calls her has grown well and produced fruit, even with flattened trunk.
You never know, P. reclinata start fairly easy from cutting.
  • 0

#5 Tala

Tala

    Rank: JUVENILE

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 454 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Orlando

Posted 10 December 2010 - 01:49 PM

One of the very first palm tales I read was about a village in India. Once a coconut palm reached a certain height they would send up a climber to about 6 ft below the crown. He'd use a machete to open large cuts around the stem, place a basket of old leaves, etc. over the cuts, then wait. I forget the exact time want to say 6 months or so. Eventually a root ball would form inside the basket. Then the villagers would tie rope to the crown and pull the top of the palm down, re-plant and no more climbing - for awhile anyway. They did this “air layering” process over & over with continued success. Not sure this is applicable to all palm genera but any prone to forming adventitious roots are worth a go. And Syagrus is where Cocos diverged from all those millions of yrs ago ...


  • 0
- dave

#6 MattyB

MattyB

    Rank: SETTING SEED

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 17,307 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spring Valley, CA (San Diego County)

Posted 10 December 2010 - 02:28 PM

Uh, didn't they know that the coconuts made new palms? :blink:
  • 0
Matt Bradford
"Manambe Lavaka"
Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)
10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)
9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

#7 paulgila

paulgila

    pohonkelapa

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 13,166 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:san diego,CA

Posted 10 December 2010 - 02:45 PM

the point was they didnt have to climb so high by cutting em. :winkie:
  • 0
the "prince of snarkness."

still "warning-free."

san diego,california,left coast.

#8 LJG

LJG

    Lavoixia macrocarpa

  • IPS DIRECTOR
  • 6,733 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Vista, CA

Posted 10 December 2010 - 03:17 PM

To answer the question. No you can not cut a palm in half and have it just start growing again.
  • 0
Len

Vista, CA (Zone 10a)
Shadowridge Area

"Show me your garden and I shall tell you what you are."
-- Alfred Austin

#9 MattyB

MattyB

    Rank: SETTING SEED

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 17,307 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spring Valley, CA (San Diego County)

Posted 10 December 2010 - 03:36 PM

And Pam's husband wouldn't like that either.
  • 0
Matt Bradford
"Manambe Lavaka"
Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)
10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)
9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

#10 paulgila

paulgila

    pohonkelapa

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 13,166 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:san diego,CA

Posted 10 December 2010 - 06:12 PM

wheres yer earthy/pithy analogy len? terry had a good one.we expect more from you. :angry:
  • 0
the "prince of snarkness."

still "warning-free."

san diego,california,left coast.

#11 mangolorry

mangolorry

    Rank: GERMINATING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 56 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Nth coast NSW Australia

Posted 10 December 2010 - 07:54 PM

If you are Australian the title of this thread has a whole different meaning. So to answer the question from a down under perspective, yes it is possible but not recommended as you would have difficulty finding a willing partner and you might fall out.
  • 0

#12 paulgila

paulgila

    pohonkelapa

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 13,166 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:san diego,CA

Posted 10 December 2010 - 07:58 PM

:floor:

now i see why there are so many aussies here--they get a totally DIFFERENT meaning to every topic! :P
  • 0
the "prince of snarkness."

still "warning-free."

san diego,california,left coast.

#13 Alan_Tampa

Alan_Tampa

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 854 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tampa, Fl

Posted 10 December 2010 - 08:13 PM

I think that India anecdote was in reference to cocunuts that were exeptional producers. They wanted to be able to harvest with ease and maintain the good 'uns.

Alan
  • 0
Tampa, Florida
Zone - 10a

#14 calyptrocalyx&licuala freck

calyptrocalyx&licuala freck

    Rank: FLOWERING

  • IN MEMORIAM
  • 1,532 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cairns Aussie,Born Invercargill.. N.Z....

Posted 10 December 2010 - 08:45 PM

If you are Australian the title of this thread has a whole different meaning. So to answer the question from a down under perspective, yes it is possible but not recommended as you would have difficulty finding a willing partner and you might fall out.

I'm a Kiwi , But being here for over 24 years, so i see me as a Aussie
just can't work this out, cut a palm to get another... Hmmm perharps
the writer meant by pulling the palm down a new palm grew.
Well just started from a lower point after getting pulled down....
  • 0
M.H.Edwards
"Living in  the Tropic's
And loving it".............. Posted Image

#15 DoomsDave

DoomsDave

    Dave of the Dead

  • IPS DIRECTOR
  • 21,479 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:La Habra, California, USA

Posted 10 December 2010 - 09:18 PM

A little over a month ago my dad cut down a Queen palm (Syagrus romanzoffiana?). He had it cut into four foot sections. I was curious to see if I could root up the top if I just stuck it in the ground. So I did. It's been in the ground now for about a month, and it's actually put out new growth -- but pretty pitiful new growth. I'll take a picture of it.

Seriously I doubt that I'll be able to root it. But are there palms that you can root this way? I know that cycads, and some tree ferns will -- but they're totally different.


ordinarily, I agree with the naysayers, but there are times when wierd [fecal material] happens.

Don't give up on your palm top yet.
  • 0

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.


#16 rprimbs

rprimbs

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 598 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Escondido, California

Posted 11 December 2010 - 01:33 PM

If you are Australian the title of this thread has a whole different meaning. So to answer the question from a down under perspective, yes it is possible but not recommended as you would have difficulty finding a willing partner and you might fall out.


Yeah, but if I could get her up in the palm tree -- and even if we did fall -- it would be a very memorable experience! :blush:
  • 0

#17 Dypsisdean

Dypsisdean

    Rank: SETTING SEED

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 4,429 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Big Island - Kona Coast

Posted 11 December 2010 - 02:33 PM

There is a very interesting thread on Palmpedia about a tall multiple headed Queen Palm that had the top broken off near the heads. The poster put it in a pot and it rooted. Here is one pic before it snapped off, and one as it lay on the ground. The potting and re-rooting is well documented with more pics and commentary HERE

Attached Thumbnails

  • before.jpg
  • broken.jpg

  • 0
Posted Image
PALM & COMPANION PLANT RESOURCE
Posted Image
Kona, on The Big Island
Hawaii - Land of Volcanoes

#18 Walter John

Walter John

    explorer

  • IPS DIRECTOR
  • 14,390 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Darling Downs and Sunshine Coast Hinterland, Queensland , Australia

Posted 11 December 2010 - 03:54 PM

Possums do as do flying foxes and quite possibly carpet snakes. I had a snake once which was good at mathematics, it was sum adder.
  • 0
Happy Gardening
Cheers,
Wal
Queensland, Australia.

#19 rprimbs

rprimbs

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 598 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Escondido, California

Posted 11 December 2010 - 04:48 PM

There is a very interesting thread on Palmpedia about a tall multiple headed Queen Palm that had the top broken off near the heads. The poster put it in a pot and it rooted. Here is one pic before it snapped off, and one as it lay on the ground. The potting and re-rooting is well documented with more pics and commentary HERE


I'll take a picture of mine tomorrow. I was just looking at it today and I think that it is going to make it. Some of the new growth is pretty green. It appears that you can root one from a cutting.
  • 0

#20 rprimbs

rprimbs

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 598 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Escondido, California

Posted 11 December 2010 - 04:55 PM

Possums do as do flying foxes and quite possibly carpet snakes. I had a snake once which was good at mathematics, it was sum adder.


I caught this character stealing cat food..

Posted Image
  • 0

#21 rprimbs

rprimbs

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 598 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Escondido, California

Posted 12 December 2010 - 08:03 AM

Okay here's are some pictures of my planted Queen palm cutting. It's getting even more new growth. Look closely and you'll see the new spear coming up. Good grief these queen palms are ridiculously bulletproof!

Attached Thumbnails

  • Queen cutting, C. panzhihuaensis.JPG
  • More new growth.JPG

  • 0

#22 tjwalters

tjwalters

    Rank: FLOWERING

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 1,624 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bowie, MD

Posted 12 December 2010 - 08:17 AM

Fascinating thread - especially the link to the multi-headed queen that was dropping rooting chunks.

Queens are pretty tough. I have large potted specimen (a few inches of trunk) that was creeping up out of the pot. I took it out, cut off the bottom third of the roots with a hacksaw, and repotted it. It never missed a beat.
  • 0
Tom
Bowie, Maryland, USA - USDA z7

Potted Palm Collection

Posted Image

#23 BS Man about Palms

BS Man about Palms

    This TVR is trapped in my garage by PALMS!

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 16,574 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Oceanside, CA.

Posted 12 December 2010 - 09:27 AM

With the weather we are having, that thing might have a go!!
  • 0
Zone 10a at best after 2007 AND 2013, on SW facing hill, 1 1/2 miles from coast in Oceanside, CA. 30-98 degrees, and 45-80deg. about 95% of the time.

"The great workman of nature is time."
"Genius is nothing but a great aptitude for patience."
-George-Louis Leclerc de Buffon-

#24 mjff

mjff

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 892 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:San Angelo, TX

Posted 12 December 2010 - 12:42 PM

A little over a month ago my dad cut down a Queen palm (Syagrus romanzoffiana?). He had it cut into four foot sections. I was curious to see if I could root up the top if I just stuck it in the ground. So I did. It's been in the ground now for about a month, and it's actually put out new growth -- but pretty pitiful new growth. I'll take a picture of it.

Seriously I doubt that I'll be able to root it. But are there palms that you can root this way? I know that cycads, and some tree ferns will -- but they're totally different.


It's worth a try. I wish I had tried it with the head of my Jubaea when it fell over. It appeared everything above the rotten spot on the trunk was still alive and healthy, but I assumed it wouldn't work. Now I still wonder from time to time what would have happened if I had cut off the rotten part, painted the bottom with rooting hormone, and planted it. Let us know if it works.
  • 0
Martin Farris, San Angelo, TX
San Angelo Cold Hardy Palms and Cycads
Jul - 92F/69F, Jan - 55F/31F
Lows:
02-03: 18F;
03-04: 19F;
04-05: 17F;
05-06: 11F;
06-07: 13F;
07-08: 14F 147.5 Freezing Degree-Hours http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?sh...ee+hours\;
08-09: 23F;
09-10: 12F 467.6 Freezing Degree Hours, Average Temperature During Freeze 24.2F;
10-11: 13F 1,059.5 Freezing Degree Hours with Strong Winds/Rain/Snow/Sleet, Average Temperature During Freeze 19.4F;
Record low -4F in 1989 (High of 36F that p.m.) 1,125.2 freezing degree hours, Average Temperature During Freeze 13.6F;
Record Freeze 1983: 2,300.3 Freezing Degree Hours with a low of 5F, Average Temperature During Freeze 13.7F.

#25 Kumar

Kumar

    Rank: FLOWERING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 1,468 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Calcutta, India

Posted 12 December 2010 - 01:08 PM

Dean, that link to the palmpedia discussion seems like something out of ripley's believe it or not. :)

I have seen a huge clump of d. Lutescens where an old specimen fallen over due to the wind has been growing horizontally with a new bunch of roots mid way up the stem. unfortunately the clump is inside a navy compound and photography nmot allowed.
  • 0
____________________
Kumar

Bombay, India
Sea Level | Average Temperature Range 23 - 32 deg. celsius | Annual rainfall 3400.0 mm

Calcutta, India
Sea Level | Average Temperature Range 19 - 33 deg. celsius | Annual rainfall 1600.0 mm

#26 LJG

LJG

    Lavoixia macrocarpa

  • IPS DIRECTOR
  • 6,733 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Vista, CA

Posted 12 December 2010 - 07:10 PM

Right now botanist are laughing at us.
  • 0
Len

Vista, CA (Zone 10a)
Shadowridge Area

"Show me your garden and I shall tell you what you are."
-- Alfred Austin

#27 garrin

garrin

    Rank: SEEDLING

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 205 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:near hilo, hawaii

Posted 12 December 2010 - 08:54 PM

Miracles happen! Many years ago my uncle in central FL had most of a row of queens broken off by hurricane Donna. When the eye passed and the wind shifted some of them went back upright, severed from there former bases and re-rooted and grew. He said that in his sandy, saturated soil some of those tops were blown about until nearly ten feet of the top part of the trunk was buried, and several of them re-rooted and grew. I saw the evidence with my own eyes!
  • 0
garrin in hawaii

#28 PalmatierMeg

PalmatierMeg

    Rank: SETTING SEED

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 3,685 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Cape Coral, FL

Posted 13 December 2010 - 10:03 AM

Interesting. Queens are indeed tough and 99.9% of palms couldn't perform this trick. Correct if I'm wrong but aren't palms glorified relatives of the grass family?
  • 0

Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.


#29 DoomsDave

DoomsDave

    Dave of the Dead

  • IPS DIRECTOR
  • 21,479 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:La Habra, California, USA

Posted 13 December 2010 - 10:21 AM

Dean et al:

We have a multi-headed queen in my hood in La Habra, need to go and find it . . . .

dave
  • 0

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.


#30 merrillwx

merrillwx

    Rank: SEEDLING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 103 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Alachua, Florida

Posted 14 December 2010 - 09:44 PM

My impression is that quite a few palms could be subjected to this treatment and rooted further up the trunk. Has anyone tried it on a crownshaft?
Best Wishes,
merrill
  • 0

#31 merrillwx

merrillwx

    Rank: SEEDLING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 103 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Alachua, Florida

Posted 15 December 2010 - 01:03 PM

My apologies:
I should have said has any one tried it on the trunk of a crownshafted palm
Best Wishes,
merrill
  • 0

#32 rprimbs

rprimbs

    Rank: TRUNKING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 598 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Escondido, California

Posted 14 March 2011 - 07:53 PM

Interestingly enough my headless chicken is still hanging in there. It's been almost five months since the original queen palm was cut down. It has grown slightly but it doesn't look much different than it did in the picture I posted earlier. I guess I could take another picture.

I'm going to leave it and see if eventually takes hold and really starts to grow. Then I'll probably dig it out to see how it rooted. I actually want to grow something else there.

I wonder if it helped that my dad left it to "cure" in the sun next to the garbage cans for over a week. Maybe that helped form a callus or something and helped it root and grow.
  • 0

#33 Daryl

Daryl

    Rank: SETTING SEED

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 4,292 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Gold Coast Hinterland, Queensland

Posted 15 March 2011 - 12:19 AM

Cryosophila trunks can be cut into sections and planted. Each section will grow new roots and a crown....so it is possible with some palms.


Over here, Queen palms can be run over with the lawnmover many times and still be alive years later...tough palms!


regards,
Daryl
  • 0

Gold Coast Hinterland, Queensland 28S. Mild Humid Subtropical climate. Rainfall - not consistent enough!

 

 


#34 palmcurry

palmcurry

    Rank: FLOWERING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 1,208 posts
  • Location:San Juan Capistrano, CA

Posted 16 March 2011 - 04:25 AM


Possums do as do flying foxes and quite possibly carpet snakes. I had a snake once which was good at mathematics, it was sum adder.


I caught this character stealing cat food..

Posted Image





I think thats Peachy's dog!
  • 0
Vince Bury

Zone 10a San Juan Capistrano, CA - 1.25 miles from coast.

http://www.burrycurry.com/index.html

#35 richnorm

richnorm

    Rank: FLOWERING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 1,804 posts
  • Location:New Zealand

Posted 16 March 2011 - 11:29 AM

Cryosophila trunks can be cut into sections and planted. Each section will grow new roots and a crown....so it is possible with some palms.


Over here, Queen palms can be run over with the lawnmover many times and still be alive years later...tough palms!


regards,
Daryl

Possibly because the spines which cover the entire trunk are modified roots. Have you actually seen this done Daryl?
cheers
Richard
  • 0

#36 Tampa Scott

Tampa Scott

    Rank: FLOWERING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 1,187 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tampa FL

Posted 21 January 2012 - 04:12 PM

Interestingly enough my headless chicken is still hanging in there. It's been almost five months since the original queen palm was cut down. It has grown slightly but it doesn't look much different than it did in the picture I posted earlier. I guess I could take another picture.

I'm going to leave it and see if eventually takes hold and really starts to grow. Then I'll probably dig it out to see how it rooted. I actually want to grow something else there.

I wonder if it helped that my dad left it to "cure" in the sun next to the garbage cans for over a week. Maybe that helped form a callus or something and helped it root and grow.



Is this palm still hanging in there?
  • 0

#37 tjwalters

tjwalters

    Rank: FLOWERING

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 1,624 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bowie, MD

Posted 21 January 2012 - 04:58 PM

Interesting. Queens are indeed tough and 99.9% of palms couldn't perform this trick. Correct if I'm wrong but aren't palms glorified relatives of the grass family?

Different families: grass = Poaceae, palms = Arecaceae. Both are monocots, though.
  • 0
Tom
Bowie, Maryland, USA - USDA z7

Potted Palm Collection

Posted Image

#38 DoomsDave

DoomsDave

    Dave of the Dead

  • IPS DIRECTOR
  • 21,479 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:La Habra, California, USA

Posted 21 January 2012 - 05:13 PM

I'm curious to know, too.

How about it, RP?
  • 0

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.


#39 Laisla87

Laisla87

    Rank: SEEDLING

  • FORUM MEMBER
  • 217 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney, Australia

Posted 22 January 2012 - 02:15 AM


If you are Australian the title of this thread has a whole different meaning. So to answer the question from a down under perspective, yes it is possible but not recommended as you would have difficulty finding a willing partner and you might fall out.

I'm a Kiwi , But being here for over 24 years, so i see me as a Aussie
just can't work this out, cut a palm to get another... Hmmm perharps
the writer meant by pulling the palm down a new palm grew.
Well just started from a lower point after getting pulled down....


I'm with you; I'm Aussie but I can't work this out either...
  • 0

#40 peachy

peachy

    Rank: SETTING SEED

  • IPS MEMBER
  • 2,740 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Queensland Australia

Posted 22 January 2012 - 02:19 AM

I broke a C. tepejilote while repotting it, so I potted up the top part and voila , it grew!! I tried it again with a C. metallica and same thing happened. It can be done .... so there.
Peachy
  • 0
I came. I saw. I purchased


27.35 south.
Warm subtropical, with occasional frosts.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Cold Hardy

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users