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Pre Tour Uruguay


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#1 caranday

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Posted 11 June 2010 - 02:31 PM

Hello everbody

I want to share some pictures of the Pre tour in Uruguay where we visit the biggest palm grove of Butia "capitata"
of the world.
( or after Rio perhaps butia "odorata" palm grove)

P3260004.JPG
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P3260026.JPG P3260009.JPG
P3260042.JPG P3260065.JPG
P3260054.JPG P3260032.JPG



cheers
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#2 krishnaraoji88

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Posted 11 June 2010 - 02:45 PM

Simply amazing!

-Krishna
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#3 Xerarch

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Posted 11 June 2010 - 06:48 PM

Brings back memories, I lived in Uruguay for a while. Those large Butia are so amazing, they say some are 500 years old. You just don't see them that size here in Arizona. Most people don't realize how beautiful a mature one can be, plus I like the fruit.

Estoy muy celoso de todo Ustedes que estan alla! Seria bueno ir y pasear un poquito otra vez, pero aqui me quedo sin mucha plata (como dicen alla).
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#4 Nigel

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 03:09 AM

A wonderful wonderful sight, but also very sad, to see all those thousands of beautiful palms without any offspring, and to know that one day that sight will not exist any more.
This situation is common throughout many of the great butia populations still existing in the wild.

Edited by Nigel, 12 June 2010 - 03:10 AM.

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#5 krishnaraoji88

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 04:30 AM

A wonderful wonderful sight, but also very sad, to see all those thousands of beautiful palms without any offspring, and to know that one day that sight will not exist any more.
This situation is common throughout many of the great butia populations still existing in the wild.


That is sad, I didnt notice that before :( Perhaps North Florida will look like this one day as we have Butia sprout here wild!

-Krishna
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Living in Miami becoming a doctor
Gardening in Zone 9a Inland North Central Florida (Ocala)
Freezes yearly, down to about 20 degrees with frost


#6 Xerarch

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 06:11 AM

I have also noticed the lack of young trees, if you are down there you will see that there aren't any small trees except along the road where there is a fence separating the road from the rest of the countryside. I think that because there is heavy grazing by cattle, the young ones always get eaten up, can anyone verify that this is the reason?
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#7 Gileno Machado

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Posted 13 June 2010 - 01:34 PM

That's beautiful Gastón, thanks for showing us these pictures. Is this huge Butia grove located in public land? A national park, maybe? Considering the ecologic importance of this ancient grove, I guess there should be made all efforts to guarantee natural regeneration and scientific research on the species. Unfortunely up here in NE Brazil we're still losing several palm habitats to pasture land, also. It's been a pleasure to meet you in Rio during the biennial. Please keep the photos coming, both from your palms y de las magnificas palmeras uruguayas.
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#8 Alberto

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Posted 16 June 2010 - 06:51 AM

Hola Gastón! Gracias pelas fotos!! Mui lindo palmar!
It was also a pleasure to meet you at the Biennial in Rio!!
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I am seeking for cold hardy palms!

#9 caranday

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Posted 16 June 2010 - 02:42 PM

Gileno, Alberto el placer fue mio!

Thank you, plessure is mine, and thank you for your hospitality.
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#10 Ryagra

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Posted 23 June 2010 - 08:58 PM

i like the 4 headed palm.
very unique. =]
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#11 Patrick

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Posted 22 August 2010 - 08:54 PM

You know, this just popped in my head today when I was driving to the store, but maybe THAT'S why the beef in that area is so tasty. They're getting a steady diet of Butia fruit!

I took a trip to Uruguay (Montevideo) once and one of the things that I remember is that even the burgers at McDonalds were good- way better than up here in the states. I got a pair of great football shoes at the Faria that I have not been able to find replacements for. Memories memories, thanks for the great pictures!
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#12 realarch

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 10:11 AM

A Butia forest, incredible.
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#13 calyptrocalyx&licuala freck

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Posted 10 December 2010 - 10:36 PM

Nice thread....
Regards Mikey.. :)
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#14 Takil-Explorer

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 07:14 PM

Butia can often not regenerate because cattle eat the young seedlings and palms. So uneless the cattle is removed those Butia stands will die out in the long term! These huge palmares should be protected as natureserves and for collecting the Butia fruits. In Brasil I have seen that Butia eriospatha stands get overgrown and shaded out by pine plantations! Uneless these habitats are wellprotected and managed in a proper way these Butia palms will face a blake futur! And that could be easeliy prevented!

Alexander
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#15 Nigel

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 02:11 PM

Butia can often not regenerate because cattle eat the young seedlings and palms. So uneless the cattle is removed those Butia stands will die out in the long term! These huge palmares should be protected as natureserves and for collecting the Butia fruits. In Brasil I have seen that Butia eriospatha stands get overgrown and shaded out by pine plantations! Uneless these habitats are wellprotected and managed in a proper way these Butia palms will face a blake futur! And that could be easeliy prevented!

Alexander


Yes it is very sad to see, all of south america is the same,worse still by far is the pulp industry which destroys entire landscapes as far as you can see in every direction to plant eucalyptus and pinus.
Before and after pic of beautiful trithrinax acanthacoma in habitat before hte bulldozers moved in and replanted with wretched Pinus.

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#16 JD in the OC

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Posted 03 August 2011 - 08:56 PM

Wow, didn't know Butia grew in such numbers in habitat. Very cool! Any Mules in-amongst there?...

JD
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