Salton Sea Coconut

63 posts in this topic

not sufficient humidity index , also needs more rain. If it grows , it grows, but not in healthy and wealthy conditions also the fruit will not develop correctly

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I know this is an old thread, but I can't help but chime in. When we lived in Goleta (Santa Barbara), my family fell in love with the desert. We actually took summer vacations to Palm Springs regularly, and I even talked by then-pregnant wife into a day trip from Palm Springs to the edge of Mexicali. There's somerthing about the utter desolation and generally decrepit nature of the real desert that speaks to me. I felt like Calexico was the desert half-sibling of the ghetto farm towns in the Glades where I was born. (My wife, by the way, HATED everything we saw south of the date plantations.)

I wasn't a palm guy then, though I was interested in palms and made sure to hike the native palm oases at least once per visit. However, I've alwasy been a naturalist, and I can tell you that the reptiles and, to a lesser extent, the plants I encountered on the actual edge of the oh-so-stinky Salton Sea were different than what I encountered in Palm Springs. That sea is huge, and I have no doubt that it would moderate the climate more thoroughly than an urban heat island. But it's bone dry, and, to be honest, most structures on the sea look like the zombie apocolypse already took place there. To the Florida folk who've never cruised the deep deseret of CA: it ain't like any other place in America. But imagine if Belle Glade, FL and Phoenix, AZ had a love child, and then that town lay abandoned for twenty years. THAT would fit the Salton Sea communities I've seen. There aren't people, money, water, etc., to do any coconut experiment. But I do believe it would work, and I don't for a second believe that the soil temps right along the sea are ever too cold. I'll try to find a photo of one of these communities my wife took during our drive to Calexico back in 2009.

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SDC10054.JPG

here's the photo of a Salton Sea "community" my wife took in 2009 (note the dead Washingtonia in the foreground)

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I too have been to the salton sea, and didn't see any cocos. I saw date groves and abandoned shacks.

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looks scary over there... :bemused:

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I wonder what rate of PAY one would need to live in a hot, stinky, deserted area year round to watch some coconut grow?

Didn't it get determined that there were surviving Salton Sea coconuts?

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I wonder what rate of PAY one would need to live in a hot, stinky, deserted area year round to watch some coconut grow?

 

Didn't it get determined that there were surviving Salton Sea coconuts?

 

I was out in North Shores (north Salton Sea) today. Very nice out there with a wonderful view of the Salton Sea. I would not mind owning a few acres up there for sure! 

And by the way there's actually plenty of neighborhoods and people living all around the area. The apocalypse hasn't happened out there yet.

 

Here's some cocos I saw last week in the south part of the salton sea.

IMG_20151101_46956.thumb.jpg.51d08f13ab8 

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I have to say, I'm impressed.  As long as they are irrigated(!) those should be handsome trunking specimens in 2-3 years.

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From the other thread Daniel posted, it seems to me they are a bit recent, but hopefully they will manage long term, the following winter in theory will be warm in CA?

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:interesting:..........

......

 

 

I knew Kyle had the goods on this. Epic, I think you know I am yanking you poor souls in California's chain. You do not need the Salton Sea Coconut when you got those 90 foot Ceroxolyn, Rhopies,et. al.But the human condition always calls out for that green on the other side of the fence. So close but just out of reach.

:hmm:

 

I think I got the goods...

 

SALTON SEA 

IMG_20151101_10139.thumb.jpg.1096497a101

 

PALM DESERT

IMG_20150617_24529.thumb.jpg.e626f5a4095

 

LA QUINTA

IMG_20150605_5299.thumb.jpg.a182fcc28d60

 

 

MYTH BUSTED:violin:

If I keep looking, I'll find more............................................................................:bemused:

 

 

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Keep looking, man, keep looking!   :lol:

 

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Do keep looking!

Stoke the fire of coconut craziness.

After the earlier massacre (well, okay it was just one) we want some good news!

 

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looks tasty!!

nuttin like cali coconuts eh!

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:interesting:..........

......

 

 

I knew Kyle had the goods on this. Epic, I think you know I am yanking you poor souls in California's chain. You do not need the Salton Sea Coconut when you got those 90 foot Ceroxolyn, Rhopies,et. al.But the human condition always calls out for that green on the other side of the fence. So close but just out of reach.

:hmm:

 

I think I got the goods...

 

SALTON SEA 

IMG_20151101_10139.thumb.jpg.1096497a101

 

PALM DESERT

IMG_20150617_24529.thumb.jpg.e626f5a4095

 

LA QUINTA

IMG_20150605_5299.thumb.jpg.a182fcc28d60

 

 

MYTH BUSTED:violin:

If I keep looking, I'll find more............................................................................:bemused:

 

 

keep on keeping on :) 

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i can taste that La Habra Style curry, made with California coconut milk!  :drool::drool::drool::drool:

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Following precedent on the other long coconut thread, I predict the largest one will be cut down soon... or there are already pics of it due to be posted...

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9 hours ago, BS Man about Palms said:

Following precedent on the other long coconut thread, I predict the largest one will be cut down soon... or there are already pics of it due to be posted...

Are you talking about this...?

IMG_20150618_14471.thumb.jpg.f70413c42f9

 

:violin::crying:

 

 

Edited by Danilopez89
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7 hours ago, Danilopez89 said:

Are you talking about this...?

IMG_20150618_14471.thumb.jpg.f70413c42f9

 

:violin::crying:

 

 

Death to the Coconut, long live the Queen!

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17 hours ago, Danilopez89 said:

Are you talking about this...?

 

 

:violin::crying:

 

 

yep... 

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8 hours ago, BS Man about Palms said:

yep... 

It's only ONE coconut.

Bet time and searching will reveal more. Possibly many more.

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What I'm getting is that any non-stunted California coconut is not going to be found in the major population areas near the coast like LA or San Diego. Seems like these desert areas where there's much more heat is the only place it's going to work (for all intensive purposes).

Edited by Opal92
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Just thought I'd throw this out there. Yuma being an excessively dry climate the recent recorded low was 26 not 22. The airport records show 26 but that was one time in many many years that it got into the 20's. Usually its 35-40 is the absolute winter minimum with the days dry jumping back up into the 70's the next day. The sea of cortez is about 70 miles from Yuma give or take a few miles. There is a semi moderating effect at night often the wind blows from the south. This USDA plant hardiness map demonstrates that Yuma has warmer winter nights than the salton sea or la quinta by an average of about 5 degrees. You can use this map yourself to check this out: http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/phzmweb/interactivemap.aspx If the coconut was well watered and then get a hose mister to help out on really hot summer days they would likely take off like a rocket managing transpiration is key its a similar problem seen with avocados when tried in the desert. Like a coconut would thrive if heat of the day sun was partially shaded but the morning and near sunset was full sun. They would probably do ok without the mister but the fronds might look a little ratty at the ends then of course you have to amend a good chunk of soil around the planting site on a south facing location wall with a big shade tree in the center of the yard with sand a well draining soil and organic palm fertilizer and probably some black sand or gravel on the top soil with a few relatively large black rocks scattered around would probably be the perfect desert planting site.. This would help out during the winter a lot. Thing is they need a lot of water to last a long time. I don't think most people realize how much water they need they are not low water plants like a lot of other palm trees seen in the area. They have to be well irrigated in the desert if you get lazy they'll probably die back. The ones in desert town of Cabo San Lucas on the tip of Baja California that are planted by the roadside don't get enough water and they do poorly despite being south of the tropic of cancer and near a warm ocean.

plant-map1.jpg

Edited by tfinvold
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