Salton Sea Coconut

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Coconut Palms can be grown in California as demonstrated by the stunted but long lasting Newport Beach Coconut. Numerous others on the Board, particularly in favored locations in Los Angeles and San Diego, have been somewhat sucessful.It seems likely that if a specimen with proper genetics can be developed that accepts cold and wet roots, that no problem will exist.

That stated, a continuing saga emanates regarding the "Salton Sea Coconut". BS recently brought this up and indicated that a Southern California Palm Society article covered it in depth. I seem to recall many years ago now that Gonzer posted some articles that told the story. I believe a school teacher planted them and they survived for a period of time but perished after he left.

This seems to imply that desert areas like Palm Springs and environs would create adequate conditions for growing Cocos nucifera. I remember Cristobal did a rather painstaking attempt under similar conditions that failed notwithstanding his expertise.Can anyone enlighten me on this interesting story?

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Temperatures are warm enough year round in the desert that they should be able to grow in certain locations in the deserts of SO Cal. I have seen photo's of the Salton Sea specimens years ago, but I do not know if they are still alive today.

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I can't imagine a coconut living in california desert. . .sure there is lots of heat and higher average nighttime temps, but these area can be subject to extreme freezes pretty frequently. . .so I can't imagine a coconut living for more than a couple years at best. . .add the total lack of humidity and it seems extra impossible. Obviously all the coastal locations that never get freezes have very little heat. . .so it seems no location would have everything a coconut could want.

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I can't imagine a coconut living in california desert. . .sure there is lots of heat and higher average nighttime temps, but these area can be subject to extreme freezes pretty frequently. . .so I can't imagine a coconut living for more than a couple years at best. . .add the total lack of humidity and it seems extra impossible. Obviously all the coastal locations that never get freezes have very little heat. . .so it seems no location would have everything a coconut could want.

I have lived in Palm Desert for a work assignment years ago. The weather was warm year around and it never froze where I was living. It also warmed quickly in the morning which we don't do here on the coastal strip. Yes there are areas of freezes at times in the desert, but there are also incredible microclimate locations where there is never a freeze. I have seen very tropical plants growing in the desert and think many more would if tried. I have also seen photos of the University in Arizona where the microclimate there enables them to grow incredible cold sensitive tropical tree's. There are just too few Palm People living in our deserts that are testing plants right now.

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I can't imagine a coconut living in california desert. . .sure there is lots of heat and higher average nighttime temps, but these area can be subject to extreme freezes pretty frequently. . .so I can't imagine a coconut living for more than a couple years at best. . .add the total lack of humidity and it seems extra impossible. Obviously all the coastal locations that never get freezes have very little heat. . .so it seems no location would have everything a coconut could want.

I have lived in Palm Desert for a work assignment years ago. The weather was warm year around and it never froze where I was living. It also warmed quickly in the morning which we don't do here on the coastal strip. Yes there are areas of freezes at times in the desert, but there are also incredible microclimate locations where there is never a freeze. I have seen very tropical plants growing in the desert and think many more would if tried. I have also seen photos of the University in Arizona where the microclimate there enables them to grow incredible cold sensitive tropical tree's. There are just too few Palm People living in our deserts that are testing plants right now.

I have heard that Phoenix and such does have microclimates where there is never a freeze. I looked up historical weather for places like palm springs and it shows there has been 20 degrees cold events in past, so that is where I'm basing on the lows. But like you said, there very well could be microclimates where there is never freezes like that. And I suppose even if they only happen once in a blue moon, things could squeak through and recover readily.

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I can't imagine a coconut living in california desert. . .sure there is lots of heat and higher average nighttime temps, but these area can be subject to extreme freezes pretty frequently. . .so I can't imagine a coconut living for more than a couple years at best. . .add the total lack of humidity and it seems extra impossible. Obviously all the coastal locations that never get freezes have very little heat. . .so it seems no location would have everything a coconut could want.

Coconuts will thrive in a desert if it's not too cold for too long.

They grow like gangbusters in Saudi Arabia, which is just barely outside the tropics.

Where you are, is WAY too cold.

I think the right spot in the California low desert could be a winner.

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They grow food there for a reason: Always warm and freezes are far and few between.

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I can't imagine a coconut living in california desert. . .sure there is lots of heat and higher average nighttime temps, but these area can be subject to extreme freezes pretty frequently. . .so I can't imagine a coconut living for more than a couple years at best. . .add the total lack of humidity and it seems extra impossible. Obviously all the coastal locations that never get freezes have very little heat. . .so it seems no location would have everything a coconut could want.

Coconuts will thrive in a desert if it's not too cold for too long.

They grow like gangbusters in Saudi Arabia, which is just barely outside the tropics.

Where you are, is WAY too cold.

I think the right spot in the California low desert could be a winner.

Well yeah, where I am is way too cold for just about everything!

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I am asking about specific information regarding the details of the "Salton Sea Coconut". BS said there was a recent article regarding it in the Southern California Palm Journal.You can Google it and see numerous direct references. I am almost certain that Gonser did a thread on it a number of years ago.

Cristobal did an interesting experiment in the Northern Desert of Mexico with an attempt to grow Cocos nucifera in the low desert. It occupies another thread somewhere.

I want to know about the "Salton Sea Coconut"'

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I can't imagine a coconut living in california desert. . .sure there is lots of heat and higher average nighttime temps, but these area can be subject to extreme freezes pretty frequently. . .so I can't imagine a coconut living for more than a couple years at best. . .add the total lack of humidity and it seems extra impossible. Obviously all the coastal locations that never get freezes have very little heat. . .so it seems no location would have everything a coconut could want.

Coconuts will thrive in a desert if it's not too cold for too long.

They grow like gangbusters in Saudi Arabia, which is just barely outside the tropics.

Where you are, is WAY too cold.

I think the right spot in the California low desert could be a winner.

Well yeah, where I am is way too cold for just about everything!

*Ahem...*

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Those areas of California are zone 9 on the map. If there is a microclimate there that keeps temps in a zone 10b range is one HECK of a microclimate.

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Those areas of California are zone 9 on the map. If there is a microclimate there that keeps temps in a zone 10b range is one HECK of a microclimate.

The USDA zone map is crappy for determining what can grow in CA. The whole SF Bay Area is a USDA zone 9, yet there are areas that could be considered zone 8 through zone 10 in a relatively small area. The same probably is true for the desert regions and they also have a high heat index, great for coconuts.

I read the articles and saw the pictures of those supermarket purchased coconuts and they thrived for years until the home owner sold the property and the palms weren't watered by the new uncaring owner.

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I am asking about specific information regarding the details of the "Salton Sea Coconut". BS said there was a recent article regarding it in the Southern California Palm Journal.You can Google it and see numerous direct references. I am almost certain that Gonser did a thread on it a number of years ago.

Cristobal did an interesting experiment in the Northern Desert of Mexico with an attempt to grow Cocos nucifera in the low desert. It occupies another thread somewhere.

I want to know about the "Salton Sea Coconut"'

There was an article in either Princeps or the SC Palms magazine years ago (I don't think it was recent or I didn't see that article) that had pictures of this coconut in the backyard of some house near the Salton Sea. There was no real info other than anectodal. The palm, according to the article, died a slow death from having zero water. I want to say that the house was empty or abandoned. That's all I remember from the article.

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Could one of our CA members please drive there and let us know what the situation is. :) What is that, a 2 hour drive from Metro LA and San Diego?

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Just looking at some pics of the area, I think a better term would be....

RURAL MYTH rather than urban myth! :lol:

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Could one of our CA members please drive there and let us know what the situation is. :) What is that, a 2 hour drive from Metro LA and San Diego?

Ok.....I just got here. Man is it hot!

I don't see the palm. Jeez, it's hot!

I'm going home after I pick up a date shake.

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Those Date Shakes at that roadsider near Indio are a fine thing. Seriously, if Cocos nucifera is well suited for the low desert, why are they not being grown and reported by the multitude of folks in the low desert. Simply review the low desert temperature stats for minimum temperatures in Winter and I think you will see the long string of low 40's that simply do not allow it's growth.Got to believe if they were realistic, Palm Springs would sport Coconuts at every turn.

The best spots would seem to be places like Newport Beach and areas like Happ's in the high ground that have the highest low temperatures during Winter.

Still would love to hear about the "Salton Sea Coconut".I can even remember the LA Times article that someone posted that told the story of a teacher who planted them and they grew for a period of time.My guess is that they grew well during a period of above average warmth but passed after the inevitable return of normal conditions.It is just one of those stories that grows legs because it tells people something they like to think is possible. Once again, if the low desert sports an adequate climate for Coconuts, why are they not all over the place?

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In answer to your question Bubba, there are very few, if any palm enthusiast living in Palm Desert trying to grow these things. When I lived there I could not believe how warm it was, even in the winter, There is a huge trunking Attalea Butyracea growing beautifully in Palm Desert as well as Delonix Regia and Cassia Fistula. Palm Desert has extreem warm microclimates due to development through the years so I think Coconuts are probable. 40F may be typical night time lows in many areas, but with quick warming to 80F in the daytime, the climate is more suitable than Newport Beach. If we had a dozen palm growers trying Coconuts we would know, but I don't know of even one IPS member living in Palm Desert. So I think the jury is still out.

Gary

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Those Date Shakes at that roadsider near Indio are a fine thing. Seriously, if Cocos nucifera is well suited for the low desert, why are they not being grown and reported by the multitude of folks in the low desert. Simply review the low desert temperature stats for minimum temperatures in Winter and I think you will see the long string of low 40's that simply do not allow it's growth.Got to believe if they were realistic, Palm Springs would sport Coconuts at every turn.

The best spots would seem to be places like Newport Beach and areas like Happ's in the high ground that have the highest low temperatures during Winter.

Still would love to hear about the "Salton Sea Coconut".I can even remember the LA Times article that someone posted that told the story of a teacher who planted them and they grew for a period of time.My guess is that they grew well during a period of above average warmth but passed after the inevitable return of normal conditions.It is just one of those stories that grows legs because it tells people something they like to think is possible. Once again, if the low desert sports an adequate climate for Coconuts, why are they not all over the place?

Because, people just don't know.

I think I'm squawkin' to the same drum.

I mean, can, what, a million Saudi A-Rabs be wrong? (About coconuts that go ahead and just grow there? Rilly!)

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Those Date Shakes at that roadsider near Indio are a fine thing. Seriously, if Cocos nucifera is well suited for the low desert, why are they not being grown and reported by the multitude of folks in the low desert. Simply review the low desert temperature stats for minimum temperatures in Winter and I think you will see the long string of low 40's that simply do not allow it's growth.Got to believe if they were realistic, Palm Springs would sport Coconuts at every turn.

The best spots would seem to be places like Newport Beach and areas like Happ's in the high ground that have the highest low temperatures during Winter.

Still would love to hear about the "Salton Sea Coconut".I can even remember the LA Times article that someone posted that told the story of a teacher who planted them and they grew for a period of time.My guess is that they grew well during a period of above average warmth but passed after the inevitable return of normal conditions.It is just one of those stories that grows legs because it tells people something they like to think is possible. Once again, if the low desert sports an adequate climate for Coconuts, why are they not all over the place?

Most people are like my wife. Non-palm people. I still shudder when I remember her saying, "Once you've seen one palm, you've seen them all. They all look the same".

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The article I have is about 12 years old and gives the address. I looked on Google earth yesterday before several here said it was dead. It would have been easy to see in person if somebody drove there. I saw about 6 houses on the road that was a housing tract.....very vacant..BUT, I would also offer that it was about 1= miles from the SALTON SEA. Theres a reason its called a SEA. Its big, I would assume it would have some regulation on nighttime temps.

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The article I have is about 12 years old and gives the address. I looked on Google earth yesterday before several here said it was dead. It would have been easy to see in person if somebody drove there. I saw about 6 houses on the road that was a housing tract.....very vacant..BUT, I would also offer that it was about 1= miles from the SALTON SEA. Theres a reason its called a SEA. Its big, I would assume it would have some regulation on nighttime temps.

Salton sea is also saline. It's saltier than the Pacific ocean and has lots of sea life in it. It's approximately 40 miles long and 15 miles wide. That's big!

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I provided a scan of the Journal's article on this subject a few years back. Maybe someone can find it.

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Gonzer, You provided the Post but unfortunately the articles had disappeared.It was one of those things that said "This Item has Disappeared" much like what we see with many similar posts of pictures that are older that just disappear. Is there any way you can rescan it and post it here? If possible, it would be great.

The rest of you guys are just California dreaming! Gary, you have one of the best Palm collections I have seen(in pictures) in California. That Acanthophoenix rubra says it all.I have to believe you have tried Coconuts at your place. I also have to believe if you were sucessful,we would know about it.

I am sure the Salton Sea gives some bump but still believe if it were truly possible on a long term basis, the Salton Sea would be surrounded by Coconuts. That alone would likely cause a huge bump in the suffering economy in that area and I have to believe enterprising IPS members in California would be reporting it.I have to believe you would even have University grants in place together with your Agriculture Department working on it.

If it is really possible, I hope someone will give it a shot.We are all dreamers at heart and we all hope for those things just out of reach.

Cristobal's project in Northern Mexico, very close to a much larger body of water, was worked very hard but showed rather conclusively that Coconuts in the low desert were not possible. I believe the best bets are in the areas that already produce together with genetic work that allows for the development of Coconut varieties that have root systems less unaccepting to cool and wet Winters.

For me, my pleasant daydream will be that 25 foot clump of Cyrtostachys renda found growing on the Eastern shore of Lake Okeechobee. The "Lake Okeechobee Cyrtostachys renda" planted by a traveling Buddist Monk, who departed after attaining enlightenment.That works for me.

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I am sure the Salton Sea gives some bump but still believe if it were truly possible on a long term basis, the Salton Sea would be surrounded by Coconuts. That alone would likely cause a huge bump in the suffering economy in that area and I have to believe enterprising IPS members in California would be reporting it.I have to believe you would even have University grants in place together with your Agriculture Department working on it.

I have to disagree, Bubba. Just where are these Coconut mad people supposed to get their seedlings at a price that makes sense? I don't think that Salton Sea-ers care enough about Coconut palms to give them the extra care, not to mention expensive water to make it anything close to a viable business. In addition, if you can grow them, that doesn't mean that they will flower and fruit. I don't think they would. Too much environmental stress. However, that doesn't mean that some Joe Blow didn't pick up a Coconut palm at the HD (labeled "Palm"), stick it in the ground and watch it grow. University grants would be a non-starter since Coconuts would never be a self propagating industry. It's just not worth the effort. It is interesting, however, that some bureacratic agency threw a bunch of money into papaya farms in the Central Valley. Since plants are cheap and fruit and ripen quickly in the heat of summer, they thought about making a business out of that. No idea of what came to it. They also have large commercial mango farms in the low desert around Palm Springs that have been very successful (2007 freeze aside).

If your argument is that coconuts cannot live longterm in California, you are 99% correct. The Newport Beach coconut is a longterm living plant. I have seen the picture of the Salton Sea coconut but have no idea how old it was when it croaked. But, I don't believe it croaked from cold.

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I live approx. 35 miles from Palm Desert, and if i did live there, I'd try a coconut. Oh wait, I'm trying one now, where I live! I agree with Jim from los Altos, that having an ideal climate for that plant's specific habitat is great. However, with a little care, attention, and reverence for the palm, certain species that the encyclopedia would say "not a chance" actually can grow, and do very well. Of course, it is a lot more work, misting systems and shade cloth for some palms in the summer, along with cotton insulated burlap sacks and christmas lights to the winter, it is at times often challenging, however in my mind, more rewarding!

As far as the Salton Sea goes, i've never seen the cocos there. I've been out there a bunch on the way to glamis for big winter weekends to ride motorcycles and such. However, I do not doubt for a second that they were there, and looked good. The Salton Sea is in fact, a microclimate in itself. It's below sea level....! Doesn't that blow your mind? A stretch of land hundreds of miles away from the ocean, and yet, it is below it! Kind of cool I think. With some clever watering tactics, I fully believe a coconut is totally doable out there.

In response to everyone that says no palm people are in Palm Desert, and its surrounding areas, allow me to enlighten you. I think if you were to go around in my town and ask people if they liked palms, the majority would say "yes." But people are only going to know what they see at their local nurseries and home depot, and all they carry are washies, robies, queens, butias, and canarys. Every once in a while you'll see a breahea edulis, and that's a treat.

The fact is, most "non'-palmers" don't know that there's much else out there. Hell I didn't. Until a friend told me about Phil Bergman and Jungle Music. After one visit, I've bought every palm book i can get my hands on, ordered every t-shirt from dypsis dean i can get, joined palm talk, gone to PSSC tours and meetings, and basically, got the disease overall.

So if we want to see more varities and more members from palm talk in the desert areas, its up to us to educate, advertise, and hype the Palm-igion!

FINS!

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I heard the owners moved and the new tenant did not care for the palm (no water) and that's why it died.

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If the microclimate is so great around the Salton Sea, I think the Southern California Palm Society together with IPS should immediately commence a project to undertake it's viability. I guarantee that you could find government grant money for this project. The ability to grow Cocos nucifera in California is a big deal and very likely ammenable to grant money considering some of the far more outlandish(to some people)projects to which our government has issued grant money.

Why is the microclimate near the saline Salton Sea any better than the microclimate further South in Northern Mexico near a much larger body of water(ie Gulf of California). Cristobal,on his own dime,has already attempted this experiment. His methods were applied scientifically in his low desert experiment. These same techniques allow him to grow with some success Cocos nucifera near Tijuana but in Ocean influenced areas not disimilar from Newport Beach.They did not succeed in the low desert.

I know the Salton Sea Coconuts did exist. Their existence and growth should be explored. Any microclimate produced by the Salton Sea would have to pale in comparison to the urban heat islands produced in Palm Springs, Phoenix, et al...As large as the wild blue yonder is, the lack of qualified IPS members in the low desert(although our members in Palm Springs, Phoenix are certainly pushing the edge of the envelope)seems a rather unlikely excuse to explain the lack of Coconut proliferation around the Salton Sea if it is truly possible long-term.

Until you folks show up with the goods(show me your Coconuts), the Salton Sea Coconut will remain one of those nice daydreams that everyone should be granted in life and not just limited to Palms. My Florida Salton Sea Coconut pleasant daydream will be the 25 foot clump of Cyrtostachys renda that flourished on the East side of Lake Okeechobee for 20 years before being ruthlessly demolished by the Army Corp. of Engineers in preparation for the building of the dike system in the late 1930's. These were planted in 1910 by a traveling Zen Monk, who left after attaining enlightenment.The Lake Okeechobee Cyrtostachys renda.

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I wonder what rate of PAY one would need to live in a hot, stinky, deserted area year round to watch some coconut grow?

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I wonder what rate of PAY one would need to live in a hot, stinky, deserted area year round to watch some coconut grow?

The above comment hits the nail on the head. This place is one of the rump-fissures of California

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If the microclimate is so great around the Salton Sea, I think the Southern California Palm Society together with IPS should immediately commence a project to undertake it's viability. I guarantee that you could find government grant money for this project. The ability to grow Cocos nucifera in California is a big deal and very likely ammenable to grant money considering some of the far more outlandish(to some people)projects to which our government has issued grant money.

Why is the microclimate near the saline Salton Sea any better than the microclimate further South in Northern Mexico near a much larger body of water(ie Gulf of California). Cristobal,on his own dime,has already attempted this experiment. His methods were applied scientifically in his low desert experiment. These same techniques allow him to grow with some success Cocos nucifera near Tijuana but in Ocean influenced areas not disimilar from Newport Beach.They did not succeed in the low desert.

I know the Salton Sea Coconuts did exist. Their existence and growth should be explored. Any microclimate produced by the Salton Sea would have to pale in comparison to the urban heat islands produced in Palm Springs, Phoenix, et al...As large as the wild blue yonder is, the lack of qualified IPS members in the low desert(although our members in Palm Springs, Phoenix are certainly pushing the edge of the envelope)seems a rather unlikely excuse to explain the lack of Coconut proliferation around the Salton Sea if it is truly possible long-term.

Until you folks show up with the goods(show me your Coconuts), the Salton Sea Coconut will remain one of those nice daydreams that everyone should be granted in life and not just limited to Palms. My Florida Salton Sea Coconut pleasant daydream will be the 25 foot clump of Cyrtostachys renda that flourished on the East side of Lake Okeechobee for 20 years before being ruthlessly demolished by the Army Corp. of Engineers in preparation for the building of the dike system in the late 1930's. These were planted in 1910 by a traveling Zen Monk, who left after attaining enlightenment.The Lake Okeechobee Cyrtostachys renda.

I highly doubt in a time like this, you're going to get grant money to try to grow a palm tree which should otherwise be left to you folks in florida, costa rica, and such. Unless you're in good with one of the highly paid Obama Czar's, you're probably "fresh" out of luck. While I'm not doubting that there are surrounding areas nearby (somewhat anyway) the salton sea that have a more favorable microclimate, a microclimate still exists nonetheless.

Considering what the "norm" for that climate is, any microclimate will probably not suffice for the livelihood of the palm, more likely the palm's life will be riddled with hunger, thirst, pain and strife.

Why these other coconuts did not survive in mirror like conditions you've described could be explained for many reasons. An unruly cold snap, lack of hydration, too much hydration, soil conditions, etc. Why does one Hedescepe in my garden tower over the other hedescepe in my garden when the both started off identical in size in a 5 gallon pot? They receive (as close as possible) equal amounts of water, sunlight, shade, and have the same soil conditions...Yet one does noticeably better. Perhaps if I was more of a Floridian expert as opposed to an ill-qualified IPS Member here in Palm Springs I could impart a better conclusion to your question...

As far as showing you my coconuts, It will take a lot more than a few fancy words from the thesaurus to show "my goods.." You'd have better luck with a spicy bloody mary or a

maker's on the rocks!

-eric

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If the microclimate is so great around the Salton Sea, I think the Southern California Palm Society together with IPS should immediately commence a project to undertake it's viability. I guarantee that you could find government grant money for this project. The ability to grow Cocos nucifera in California is a big deal and very likely ammenable to grant money considering some of the far more outlandish(to some people)projects to which our government has issued grant money.

Why is the microclimate near the saline Salton Sea any better than the microclimate further South in Northern Mexico near a much larger body of water(ie Gulf of California). Cristobal,on his own dime,has already attempted this experiment. His methods were applied scientifically in his low desert experiment. These same techniques allow him to grow with some success Cocos nucifera near Tijuana but in Ocean influenced areas not disimilar from Newport Beach.They did not succeed in the low desert.

I know the Salton Sea Coconuts did exist. Their existence and growth should be explored. Any microclimate produced by the Salton Sea would have to pale in comparison to the urban heat islands produced in Palm Springs, Phoenix, et al...As large as the wild blue yonder is, the lack of qualified IPS members in the low desert(although our members in Palm Springs, Phoenix are certainly pushing the edge of the envelope)seems a rather unlikely excuse to explain the lack of Coconut proliferation around the Salton Sea if it is truly possible long-term.

Until you folks show up with the goods(show me your Coconuts), the Salton Sea Coconut will remain one of those nice daydreams that everyone should be granted in life and not just limited to Palms. My Florida Salton Sea Coconut pleasant daydream will be the 25 foot clump of Cyrtostachys renda that flourished on the East side of Lake Okeechobee for 20 years before being ruthlessly demolished by the Army Corp. of Engineers in preparation for the building of the dike system in the late 1930's. These were planted in 1910 by a traveling Zen Monk, who left after attaining enlightenment.The Lake Okeechobee Cyrtostachys renda.

I recommend you to undertake this project, Bubba. You have the determination to see this project through to its successful conclusion. I expect to have updated blog reports on a regular basis from Mecca, CA. The ability to grow coconuts in CA, despite your writings, is not a "big deal". Though, I suspect you know that and are just having fun at this point. All the grant money went to Citigroup as part of TARP so that's a non-starter.

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Hey Bubba! I didn't read this entire post, but I have seen pictures of the Salton Sea coconuts before. There used to be a cluster of them at this guy's house, but he moved and rented his house out and the tenants ceased watering them and I think they are all now dead. In the picture I saw, half of them were dead already. None of them were trunking, but they looked like they used to be nice palms before their fronds shriveled up. I'll see if I can find these photos again. I think I remember who posted them so I just sent him an email. They weren't an impressive sight unfortunately, but they were alive nevertheless and if they had been watered sufficiently I am sure they would look like very healthy palms! I study environmental engineering and I am talking to my advisor about working/interning out there one day! I too am fascinated with growing coconuts as far north as possible! I still have 2 years of school though, so it probably won't be anytime soon if/before I head out there.

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I knew Kyle had the goods on this. Epic, I think you know I am yanking you poor souls in California's chain. You do not need the Salton Sea Coconut when you got those 90 foot Ceroxolyn, Rhopies,et. al.But the human condition always calls out for that green on the other side of the fence. So close but just out of reach.

For me, I will take that 25 foot clump of Cyrtostachys renda on the East side of Lake Okeechobee, planted by the traveling Zen monk before enlightenment, who was last seen in DC, the new green Czar, Tarp to all that smile.

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I really think it is exciting to grow palms at their limits! I love seeing pictures of people trying to push limits with their palms, especially tropical palms. Coconuts are also one of the most beautiful species, so I am naturally particularly curious about them. California is my home state, so it seems natural that I'd be interested in growing coconuts in California. It would be great if that lake were salvaged making the area more hospitable. If coconuts can fruit on the northern shore of the Sea of Cortez, it doesn't seem that unlikely that they could thrive in the Imperial Valley considering it used to be part of the Sea of Cortez before the Colorado River created a natural dam separating the valley from the sea.

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Namaste, Bubba . . . .

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Salton Sea is dismal at best and water looks toxic. I'd never stick a foot in that thing, probably grow a couple of

extra toes. It's mostly abandoned and some poor coconut wouldn't stand a chance.

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What? Salton Sea is polluted/toxic area? No palm should ever be put there.

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I knew Kyle had the goods on this. Epic, I think you know I am yanking you poor souls in California's chain. You do not need the Salton Sea Coconut when you got those 90 foot Ceroxolyn, Rhopies,et. al.But the human condition always calls out for that green on the other side of the fence. So close but just out of reach.

For me, I will take that 25 foot clump of Cyrtostachys renda on the East side of Lake Okeechobee, planted by the traveling Zen monk before enlightenment, who was last seen in DC, the new green Czar, Tarp to all that smile.

Considering you're merely just "yanking my poor california soul chain" you're sure have put a lot of effort into your posts. Perhaps you might use your abundance of spare time more usefully, like making salt water combustible, saving the manatees and seagulls in the oil spill, or baking 30 minute brownies in 20 minutes. Whatever you choose, I strongly suggest you use your time more wisely, if you seek advice, ask yourself, "What would Tim Tebow do?" The Floridian chosen one will set you free to Denver, where the Salton Sea will seem like a mecca for ideal palm growing conditions!

West Coast Represented, even 80 miles East of it!

Fins!

Eric,

Beaumont, CA

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Hmm.

on the other hand, everything's an urban myth, one way or another . . .

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