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    • IPS BIENNIAL - SARAWAK / SINGAPORE JUNE 12-19   01/23/2016

      STILL TIME TO REGISTER!!
      Don't miss this opportunity to hike through natural forest areas of Borneo to see palms in habitat led by expert guides. Experience the culture and cuisine of this exotic Southeast Asian country with fellow IPS travelers.
      In Singapore you'll experience the world's largest covered garden, Gardens by the Bay, and tour the venerable Singapore Botanic Garden. 
      You must be an IPS member to register, so sign up today. For more information click HERE (For more info of past biennials and member experiences see the BIENNIAL FORUM on Palmtalk.)   One of the exotic palms of Borneo
    • NEW FORUM - PALMS IN POTS   01/23/2016

      CHECK IT OUT BELOW I think it is self explanatory - it's right below the COLD HARDY PALMS FORUM.
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World Botanical Gardens

68 posts in this topic

Aloha Bo!

Great stuff. I can't wait to get back to the islands...

It's been awhile...

4x4 fun too eh.

Mahalo.

~Ray.

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My wife and I have been there twice. The photos are only a sample of what is there. The great part of what he photographed is what most people (including us) did not see.

Thanks, Bo.

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Everyybody, thanks for your comments! :) And Tim, actually all the palms in posts #10 thru #26 are along a little road that's part of the self-guided tour you can take. We met a number of people walking there. The other palms are in two separate areas that you can certainly get to as well. The area with the Dypsis sp. white, the spiny multi-trunked mystery (post #6), Bismarckia clump (and actually quite a few others that I did not photograph) is some distance away from the visitors' center, but there's a little road running right by these palms, and as we were there, a couple of cars drove by, including one tour van. For anyone planning to visit, you may want to contact them in advance and ask if Lanny is going to be there. Lanny is an HIPS member (and listed in the HIPS 2009 roster).

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When I look at Post #8, I think of perhaps Colpothrinax cookii. Any chance?

Post #25, considering the conditions it's growing under could it possibly be Allagoptera caudescens?

Anyway those are two thoughts of mine. I've never been to this garden yet either. I'm gonna have to stop there sometime now that I know more about it.

Thanks for this thread Bo.

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Al,

Thanks a lot for your suggestions. However, I don't believe that's a Colpothrinax cookii. Here are two of ours for comparison with the mystery palm at WBG.

Bo-Göran

PS - undecided about your A. caudescens suggestion...

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post-22-1250399338_thumb.jpg

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Thanks for the pics Bo. That Dypsis sp white is amazing.

I thing post #8 is Livistona fulva. You can just see the copper coloured underleaf on the top leaf.

Regards

Brod

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Bo-Goran,

The multi-trunk spiny palm in posty no. 6 made me think of Bactris. Were the undersides of the leaflets green? Given the apparent regular arrangements of the leaflets, perhaps it could be Bactris major, not unusual for a planting.

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Bo, I have not been to that botanical garden yet but maybe the next time were out there. It would be worth the price of admission just to see the Dypsis species "White" :drool: . Those palms rock!!! Thanks for the tour.

Stevo

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Thanks Bo,

I haven't made it to the gardens yet either, but looks like it's worth going on our next visit (no idea when that will be).

It's not 100% clear, but the spiny palm in post six as far as I can see has leaflets V'd upwards, which would make it a Phoenix. The inflorescence looks like Phoenix as well. I don't guess specific phoenix species, too hard to tell apart, too many hybrids, and I don't particularly like any of them...

The palm in post 15 looks like maybe a Ptychosperma caryotoides.

Post 13 looks like some sort of Hydriastele to me, not fuzzy enough to be a Basselinia, and I don't think any Basselinia have premorse leaflets (at least not that "cut-off").

And I also thought Allagopera caudescens for #25...but I was not sure enough to even post the guess if Al had not thought the same thing (and he should know because he has a nice one).

Matt

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Here's my guesses, made before reading any posts:

6. Phoenix sp.

8. Copernicia alba (not feeling too comfortable about the species but it looks like Copernicia)

12. I agree w/ Bo, C. savaryanum

13. Areca ipot

15. Ptychosperma caryotoides

24. I agree w/ Bo, D. bef

25. Orania sp. (BS said Ravenea but the leaflets are praemorse. Allagoptera caudescens leaflets are held in groups, this is not)

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Matt,

I was going to correct you so you'd have time to correct your post, but then I thought I'd make you keep it there just to suffer. Allogoptera caudescens used to be called Polyandrococcos caudescens, and it has regular leaflets with an unusual shape (sort of fat out close to the tip...not premorse but looks like it from a distance).

Anyways, I can't tell for sure whether that palm is premorse or not, I'm not sure what it is either way. Wouldn't Orania have whitish leaf undersides? All the ones I've seen/have have the white. The O palindan you gave me is starting to look like something by the way, getting fat at the bottom and 4 or 5 nice leaves.

Matt

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Thanks everybody for comments and suggestions. I did consider Phoenix for the #6 mystery palm, but I couldn't think of a species that would have this many slender trunks. But that's probably the most likely (i.e. Phoenix). This probably won't help much, but here's another photo of the same palm. Slightly different angle.

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And Copernicia for #8 and P. caryotoides for #15 are probably good possibilities. A. ipot for #13 is an interesting choice. I have much larger A. ipot and much smaller A. ipot, so I'm somewhat unfamiliar with what a 5 ft tall ipot would look like. The main thing against the 'ipot theory' is that I'm certain this particular palm has been in the ground for a long time (probably since the mid 1990s) and based on my own growing experience it should be much larger today - assuming it's an A. ipot. But, then it's in full sun and probably hasn't been fertilized in a very long time, so who knows...

And for #25, I remain unconvinced of any of the suggested names. A. caudescens would have very whitish undersides of the leaflets, and Orania would as well.

And two more photos: Burretiokentia hapala, with inflorescences at eye level.

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Thanks for the photos Bo, I haven't been there as well. I take it that the tour you were given is not on the standard path of travel. Are there plans to expand the garden to view some of these areas?

Lee, you game for a PRA to the garden sometime?

Tim

Hi Tim

Sorry, I don't understand half the acronyms I see here. Palm Reconnaissance Adventure? Whatever it is, if you've up for it, I probably am too! When should we do whatever it is that we're going to do?

Lee

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PRA = Palm Related Activity! But I like Palm Reconnaissance Adventure! :lol:

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Matt,

I was going to correct you so you'd have time to correct your post, but then I thought I'd make you keep it there just to suffer. Allogoptera caudescens used to be called Polyandrococcos caudescens, and it has regular leaflets with an unusual shape (sort of fat out close to the tip...not premorse but looks like it from a distance).

Matt

Matt,

The A. caudescnes I've seen have irregularly spaced leaflets. Upon doing a quick search it seems that maybe there's two different forms. Are you aware of this?

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Matt,

I was going to correct you so you'd have time to correct your post, but then I thought I'd make you keep it there just to suffer. Allogoptera caudescens used to be called Polyandrococcos caudescens, and it has regular leaflets with an unusual shape (sort of fat out close to the tip...not premorse but looks like it from a distance).

Matt

Matt,

The A. caudescnes I've seen have irregularly spaced leaflets. Upon doing a quick search it seems that maybe there's two different forms. Are you aware of this?

Yes, that's my understanding that there are two different forms.

Al in Kona

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Beautiful photos and palms.

I just bought some seedling from floribunda of the Dypsis sp white. I had no idea what I was buying but Jeff suggested it. Wow...I'm going to start giving those seedling some extra attention!

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#25- Maybe some Attalaya?. Still looks like a Ravenea, but I can't see as well now..

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All the Attaleas I've seen have much more upright fronds than this palm. So, probably not... :(

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Our first mystery - this multi-trunked very spiny palm. Any ideas?

Hey Bo, I think it may be in the Bactris family or a possible phoenix hybrid. I've seen some Phoenix hybrids on the island that look somewhat similiar.

Thanks again for the tour! I've got to make it down there someday.

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Our second mystery palm. Seems like I should know this and it's probably something simple... :huh: Any ideas?

Kinda resembles a washie...

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Matt,

The A. caudescnes I've seen have irregularly spaced leaflets. Upon doing a quick search it seems that maybe there's two different forms. Are you aware of this?

Of course I knew that... :unsure: No, actually I've never seen one with irregular leaflets. Haven't seen too many larger ones though.

Matt

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This palm had me stumped when Lanny and I checked it out, but after looking at these two photos, my guess is Clinostigma savoryanum. Clinostigma didn't occur to me as a possibility at the time because I've never seen one with the inflorescence that close to the ground. Any other ideas?

Turns out that I've seen a Clinostigma with an inflorescence even closer to the ground right in my own yard. The attached picture is a Clinostigma harlandii not far from my back door; I can't say why it bloomed while still so stumpy. I have several other examples of this species and this is the only one that behaved liked this. I think that this picture makes Bo's guess of Clinostigma look really good.

Mike

post-1659-1251004610_thumb.jpg

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Mike,

Thanks for the photo and input! That looks like a very healthy Clinostigma, but I'm amazed to see the nodes so close together!

Bo-Göran

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Considering Tim's (realarch) Dypsis thread in Discussing Palm Trees might be a good idea to bump this two year old thread.

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I remember touring this garden many years ago before I planted my first palm. In fact, I don't remember noticing the palms at all! I saw my first torch ginger and Goethea and Candlenut tree there which all promptly went on my wish list. Now I have all three. So thanks for the photos and reminders of our trip!

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Phoenix canariensis. You don't see too many of these around here. As a matter of fact, I don't know any!

Proof that Phoenix canariensis can grow in humid tropical lowlands! :)

Thanks for the tour Bo-Göran

Hamakua Coast doesn't count! Never gets hot. ;-) There's a Trachycarpus fortunei thriving only about 8 blocks mauka from Hilo Bay.

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