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World Botanical Gardens

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Lanny Neel, Director of World Botanical Gardens at Umauma, invited me for an afternoon at the WBG today. This is on the Hamakua coast north of Hilo, right after the 16 mile marker.

Most of the palms were planted in the 1990s, before Lanny joined WBG, and even though many of them still have their original name tags, some of these names have now been changed. Many palms had no name tags to begin with, and my challenge was to name them. We managed to ID a majority of the palms, but there are still a few mysteries and they will be shown as such in this thread. Any feedback & suggestions most welcome!

This is the entrance from Highway 19, looking makai (towards the ocean) and mauka (towards the mountain). The avenue of Royal palms is about a quarter mile up the road, on the right hand side. Eventually a new visitor center will be built at the end of this double row of Royals and this will then become the official entrance.

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Our first stop was an area with quite a few palms, planted close together. Here's a Deckenia nobilis.

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Same area. Normally visitors walk around the garden, which is quite extensive, but Lanny gave me the VIP treatment in his 4 WD pickup truck! :)

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Now we're off to a different area, probably a mile away. Quite a few different palms planted along the road, including a couple of Attaleas and numerous Areca catechu, some of which were the dwarf variety and some that can probably be classified as 'in-betweens'.

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Definitely one of the highlights: two Dypsis sp. white individuals, with Lanny for size!

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Our first mystery - this multi-trunked very spiny palm. Any ideas?

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Phoenix canariensis. You don't see too many of these around here. As a matter of fact, I don't know any!

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Our second mystery palm. Seems like I should know this and it's probably something simple... :huh: Any ideas?

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If anyone ever wanted to know what a grove of five Bismarckia nobilis would look like, well, here's your answer!

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We're now heading down a narrow dirt road, right next to a deep ravine (where a zip line will be built soon), and plenty of palms along the road. We're making numerous stops. Here's a pair of Areca catechu.

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Colorful Rainbow eucalyptus.

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This palm had me stumped when Lanny and I checked it out, but after looking at these two photos, my guess is Clinostigma savoryanum. Clinostigma didn't occur to me as a possibility at the time because I've never seen one with the inflorescence that close to the ground. Any other ideas?

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And this little palm was close by. Another mystery. Maybe some sort of Basselinia?

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And sometimes it's the simple and obvious stuff that has you stumped. Couldn't come up with a name for this one, but looking at the photos it has Carpentaria acuminata all over it. I hope... :) (I know, I need to spend more time with my own Carpentarias, to get to know them better!)

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This little cute palm is already flowering. Had me completely stumped...

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And here's Lanny posing next to this large single-trunked palm. Looked like an Elaeis to me, but I'm open for other suggestions! Ideas?

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Here's the dirtroad we're heading downhill on. Rainforest and deep ravine on our right.

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Cryosophila warscewiczii. Getting lazy here - didn't even get out of the truck...

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Here we HAD to get out of the truck in order to see some of the palms in this area. Heavy canopy, palms all over the place and many other plants and trees as well. Lanny got tangled up in a Desmoncus and I took advantage of this extra time by exploring the immediate area! :) Here's a pair of Phoenicophorium borsigianum in pretty dense conditions.

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And right behind me these two Beccariophoenix sp. windows, again under fairly dense canopy.

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A little bit further down the road a Heterospathe glauca.

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One more photo from the road. The Caryota was tagged as C. maxima. The second photo is looking down into the ravine. Extremely heavy vegetation and you can't even see the bottom of the ravine!

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A pair of very healthy and robust Dypsis pilulifera ("Orange crush").

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This looked like Dypsis sp. bef to me. Any other ideas?

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Another mystery palm. Open for suggestions...!

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And Lanny with yet another mystery...

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Lanny insisted that this is a road. And who was I to argue? Photo taken straight ahead as we're driving. In the second photo Lanny wanted to show me a five year old baobab, which he managed to find despite the obvious challenges. I played it safe and stayed close to the truck!

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We're on our way back to the visitors' center now, but stopped at this Archontophoenix. Didn't quite look like an alexandrae. Any ideas? Light conditions unfortunately had changed for the worse at this point.

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And our last stop is at the Umauma Falls, right next to the World Botanical Gardens.

Thank you Lanny for a great afternoon! :)

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Dear Bo Goran :)

Thanks for that lovely tour,and the mystery palms all with spines were my favouriate & thanks for the CIDP still ! :drool: And the bismarkia's are wonderful..

lots of love,

Kris :)

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that looks like it was quite the expedition! :lol:

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Definitely one of the highlights: two Dypsis sp. white individuals, with Lanny for size!

Hi Bo!,

These are absolutely beautiful palms. Did these come from Jeff Marcus? The one he has in his garden is close in size but last I saw was just starting to trunk. Do you think the full sun location in the WBG sped up the growth rate?

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Thanks for the various comments! Yes, the two Dypsis sp. white did come from Floribunda/Jeff Marcus, as did most of the other palms in the garden. I think the reason for the good growth on the larger Dypsis sp. white is not so much the full sun exposure (even though that was probably a good thing, just in general) but the fact that there's a good amount of soil. Generally speaking, the area north of Hilo (off Highway 19) has deep soil. As opposed to the Puna District where soil is a precious commodity.

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Great photo tour! Thank you for taking and sharing them. Is Umauma open to the public? I can't believe we've never been there.

Sounds like Jeff might be the best person to identify these palms. My favorite mystery palm was the first one - the spiny clumper.

PS - There is one P. Canariensis on the island, or at least it was identified as such by the proprietor of the nursery where I saw it. I'll tell you which nursery by email; I don't think the nursery is a Palm Talk member.

Lee

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Definitely one of the highlights: two Dypsis sp. white individuals, with Lanny for size!

:drool:

Also, I think #25 is a Ravenea of some type.. maybe samberenesis

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One more photo from the road. The Caryota was tagged as C. maxima. The second photo is looking down into the ravine. Extremely heavy vegetation and you can't even see the bottom of the ravine!

Bo-Goren, or anyone else. What is the palm to the right of the C. maxima?

Thanks, Lee

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Bill,

Well, you may be right about Ravenea, but I'm not so sure about sambiranensis. The sambiranensis I have all have much more upright fronds.

Lee,

Yes, definitely open to the public. The garden is "World Botanical Gardens" and Umauma Falls is the waterfall right next to the garden, but not part of the garden. You actually see part of the waterfall from Highway 19. Coming from Honokaa, about 3/4 of a mile after passing the 17 mile marker, you can see the waterfall on your right. And shortly thereafter, you'll see the sign for the garden (see post #1 above), also on your right of course.

The palm to the right of the Caryota is a Pinanga coronata.

And thanks for the e-mail!

Bo-Göran

BTW - the spiny palm in post #6: as I indicated, I have no idea what this is. For some reason, the name Eugeissona hit me. I know these are spiny palms, but I don't believe I have ever seen one. And I can't find any good photos via Google. Anybody know what an Eugeissona looks like?

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Lee,

Yes, definitely open to the public. The garden is "World Botanical Gardens" and Umauma Falls is the waterfall right next to the garden, but not part of the garden. You actually see part of the waterfall from Highway 19. Coming from Honokaa, about 3/4 of a mile after passing the 17 mile marker, you can see the waterfall on your right. And shortly thereafter, you'll see the sign for the garden (see post #1 above), also on your right of course.

The palm to the right of the Caryota is a Pinanga coronata.

Bo-Göran

I am so proud of myself Bo-Goran: I finally identified a photo - the Pinanaga coronata -on Palm Talk correctly. (Don't laugh you palmers, it's a big deal for me).

We pass the sign for Umauma all the time. Somehow I got the impression it was not worth visiting. So thanks again for posting the photos. Next time we'll stop.

Lee

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Thanks for the photos Bo, I haven't been there as well. I take it that the tour you were given is not on the standard path of travel. Are there plans to expand the garden to view some of these areas?

Lee, you game for a PRA to the garden sometime?

Tim

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Phoenix canariensis. You don't see too many of these around here. As a matter of fact, I don't know any!

Proof that Phoenix canariensis can grow in humid tropical lowlands! :)

Thanks for the tour Bo-Göran

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