Coconut Palms in South Texas

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We took a short trip to the Rio Grande Valley is South Texas Tuesday and took quite a few palm pictures in the area. The below pictures were of Coconut Palms (coco nucifera) that we stumbled across. I have no idea how long each of these palms has been in the ground. However, I have a feeling they were probably planted as seeds because each was in the yard of a home that was very modest. I don't expect the families that lived in these communities had the money to by palms to plant in the yard. I have heard that there are quite a few cocos in the area that are much bigger, but I was not able to find them.

This is a juvenile coco.

DSCF2661.jpg

This modest home had two cocos growing. The one towards the back had trunk and was bearing coconuts.

DSCF2662.jpg

This is a close up of the 2nd palm with coconuts

DSCF2663.jpg

We found several good size coconuts growing in the back of a home that was converted to a business. It didn't look they were receiving much care. Again, they were loaded with coconuts.

DSCF2664.jpg

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Ouch--I hope that dead one in the last pic didn't croak from LY...

Thanks for the pics, BigTex.

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Those look like the coconuts they sell at Home Depot, as part of their Coconut Rental Program.

I wouldn't spend much for one, as Lethal Yellow roared through there a while ago, and destroyed the CIDPs that used to line the roads there.

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Dear Dave SoCal

After reading your posts about palms in Texas, could I buy you the book 'The Power of Positive Thinking" by Norman

Vincent Peale?

LOL of course.

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Also BTW Dave - we don't have lethal yellowing here - we have "TEXAS Phoenix decline"

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Big Tex, Those are great shots of those RGV Coconuts.I know the freeze history but tracking your climate, I am suprised we do not see more,especially in the RGV.Thank you

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Big Tex, Those are great shots of those RGV Coconuts.I know the freeze history but tracking your climate, I am suprised we do not see more,especially in the RGV.Thank you

There are others. They're not abundant, but they are around. There are lots of Royal palms too. Of course "lots" is a relative term, when washingtonia are planted by the millions and outnumber every other palm combined by 20-1 at least.

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We took a short trip to the Rio Grande Valley is South Texas Tuesday and took quite a few palm pictures in the area. The below pictures were of Coconut Palms (coco nucifera) that we stumbled across. I have no idea how long each of these palms has been in the ground. However, I have a feeling they were probably planted as seeds because each was in the yard of a home that was very modest. I don't expect the families that lived in these communities had the money to by palms to plant in the yard. I have heard that there are quite a few cocos in the area that are much bigger, but I was not able to find them.

This is a juvenile coco.

DSCF2661.jpg

This modest home had two cocos growing. The one towards the back had trunk and was bearing coconuts.

DSCF2662.jpg

This is a close up of the 2nd palm with coconuts

DSCF2663.jpg

We found several good size coconuts growing in the back of a home that was converted to a business. It didn't look they were receiving much care. Again, they were loaded with coconuts.

DSCF2664.jpg

Coconut palms are becoming very popular in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, especially in Cameron County (Harlingen, Brownsville, Port Isabel and South Padre). They stand a reasonably good chance of making it through the winter here, Zone 10A, whereas in the next county, Hidalgo County, just inland from Cameron County, it is a Zone 9B climate and you don't see many, if any at all. Nighttime lows just inland from the Brownsville/Harlingen area in the winter can be 3-5 degrees cooler, which is why you don't see them further inland. Brownsville's normal temps for January are highs 69F and lows 50F. South Padre is highs 67F, with lows of 52F. The all time lowest ever recorded in Brownsville is 12F in 1899, and 17F in South Padre in 1989, but temps like these only happen about once in a hundred years or so there. The last time there was a coconut killing freeze in the Rio Grande Valley was in 1989, and the time before was 1983. Before the 1983 freeze, though I have been told by a nursery owner in the area that there were a lot of coconut palms growing in the lower Valley in the 1970's. I have recently seen producing coconuts in Harlingen and one on South Padre Island that has dozens of coconuts on it, some almost mature and big enough to plant. In Brownsville there are two nice 30ft. tall (overall height) Mexican Tall coconut palms at a small motel in the center of town, but unfortunately the lawn crew keeps cutting off the flower spikes, or else these would have some nice size coconuts on them too. I hope to post my pics of these palms here soon, if I can figure out how (I"m not very computer literate though, so any suggestions will help, otherwise, I can just email the photos to anyone interested once I get them scanned onto a disc.)

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trust me we have lethal yellowing

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Hello, I Need Help Id'ing which cultivar my coco palm is.

cn1.jpg

cn2.jpg

cn3.jpg

cn4.jpg

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@COCOTEX My guess would be a Panama Tall or a Maypan.  Others please feel free to offer a more educated opinion.

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20 hours ago, COCOTEX said:

Hello, I Need Help Id'ing which cultivar my coco palm is.

cn1.jpg

cn2.jpg

cn3.jpg

cn4.jpg

Welcome to the forum.  Good question what variety it is.  It would help to know where you got it from?  It looks like it may have been grown in shade or semi shade because of the elongated and somewhat delicate looking leaves.  This happens with palms used to full sun, trying to reach the sun through the shady conditions they are grown in.  I too, live in Corpus Christi and grow coconut palms.  I am sending you a message.  Let's keep in touch.

John

 

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On 5/9/2017, 10:23:55, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

Welcome to the forum.  Good question what variety it is.  It would help to know where you got it from?  It looks like it may have been grown in shade or semi shade because of the elongated and somewhat delicate looking leaves.  This happens with palms used to full sun, trying to reach the sun through the shady conditions they are grown in.  I too, live in Corpus Christi and grow coconut palms.  I am sending you a message.  Let's keep in touch.

John

 

Thanks for the welcome, I purchased the coconut from H-E-B in 2014 and germinated it potted it in sand from Mustang Island and it's been there since. I Keep it outside in full sun but it does take a beating from our almost constant wind. I have been watering it every other day. I gave her a little Miracle Grow Palm Shake N Feed In April . In Winter If It's forecasted to be below 50 I'll put her in the garage to at least give it some protection (with my other plants ).

So im a little hesitant to plant her in the ground after 3 years 

Germinated another last year sprouted 2 healthy roots around to the bottom and I never planted and rotted. Damn i was mad at myself.

 

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On 5/9/2017, 5:24:37, kinzyjr said:

@COCOTEX My guess would be a Panama Tall or a Maypan.  Others please feel free to offer a more educated opinion.

Thanks, I saw a pic that @Mr Coconut Palm posted and it looks identical. Whatever that cultivar is is prob the same as mine. 

IMG_0728.JPG

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9 hours ago, COCOTEX said:

Thanks for the welcome, I purchased the coconut from H-E-B in 2014 and germinated it potted it in sand from Mustang Island and it's been there since. I Keep it outside in full sun but it does take a beating from our almost constant wind. I have been watering it every other day. I gave her a little Miracle Grow Palm Shake N Feed In April . In Winter If It's forecasted to be below 50 I'll put her in the garage to at least give it some protection (with my other plants ).

So im a little hesitant to plant her in the ground after 3 years 

Germinated another last year sprouted 2 healthy roots around to the bottom and I never planted and rotted. Damn i was mad at myself.

 

I went ALL ORGANIC about 5 and a half years ago, and my plants are doing much better than they ever were with all the chemicals.  Chemical fertilizers actually sterilize the soil and dry the soil out with sodium over time, which means much more watering than with organics.  Organic fertilizers actually build up the healthy microbes and bacteria in the soil, and when you have healthy living soil, you have deeper stronger roots and more vibrant healthy trees, plants, fruits and vegetables.  Also, when you go ALL ORGANIC, you end up using about 40% to 50% less water over time.  I have been using MicroLife 8-4-6 Ultimate with over 70 minerals and micronutrients.  It is all organic and is produced in Houston.

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