The colors of Areca vestiaria

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On the website Dave's Garden, Areca vestiaria var. 'maroon' is referred to as the 'Orange Crownshaft Palm'. Elsewhere there is reference to Areca vestiaria 'red form' or 'red leaf form' and yet elsewhere, Areca vestiaria 'red/maroon form'. Confusion reigned further when I found reference to Areca vestiaria 'orange' or 'Orange Collar Palm' which sounds like a reference to 'Orange Crownshaft Palm'

Are Areca vestiaria var. 'red', 'red form', 'red leaf form' and 'orange' one and the same? Is Areca vestiaria var. 'maroon' quite distinct from var. 'red' and 'orange'?

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John,

There's only one Areca vestiaria, which has an orange crownshaft and is either clumping or single trunk.

Then this palm comes in another form, either the red or maroon form which is the same,and does throw a dark color red leaf. Hope this helps.

Jeff

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One palm, two forms, orange and maroon.

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This article should answer all your questions.

ARECA VESTIARIA

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Thanks Jeff and Wal, and Dean - great feature on your website. That was eye-candy of pic n' mix proportions! So it's orange crownshaft, green leaf and red crownshaft, maroon leaf, but marron leaf is still 'Orange Crownshaft Palm' because there is only one Areca vestiaria.

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Thanks Jeff and Wal, and Dean - great feature on your website. That was eye-candy of pic n' mix proportions! So it's orange crownshaft, green leaf and red crownshaft, maroon leaf, but marron leaf is still 'Orange Crownshaft Palm' because there is only one Areca vestiaria.

Almost got it John, scrap the common names asap and you won't go wrong.

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Here's a forest of the single stemmed Areca vestiaria from Herrero's farm in Costa Rica.

This is one of my favorite photos

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John,

Just adding my own experience: first of all, yes - this is all "one and the same". Seeds from a red or maroon parent will give you both forms. I.e. some will always open with green fronds while others will always open with the maroon fronds. Ratio, approx. 70% maroon and 30% green. They will of course all have an orange/reddish crownshaft. From a parent that opens with a green new frond, the percentage of maroon offspring is very small, less than 5%. And some will be singles, doubles, triples or multiples with more than three stems. All from the same parent.

Bo-Göran

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Jeff,

That is a really cool pic, what with the colored crown shafts,and the fruit in various stages of ripeness ,being all different colors!

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Forgot to mention that we have more Areca vestiarias than any other palm. 240 in the ground in our garden. Spread out in a few different areas. Here are a few (part of a group of 92!).

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Here's a forest of the single stemmed Areca vestiaria from Herrero's farm in Costa Rica.

This is one of my favorite photos

DSC_0181-1.jpg

Wow, what a photo! :mrlooney: Do they harvest the seeds?

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Here's a forest of the single stemmed Areca vestiaria from Herrero's farm in Costa Rica.

This is one of my favorite photos

Jeff, earlier today I went through your photo documentary from the Costa Rican biennial and I was thinking myself it must have been one of the best photo threads posted on the IPS forum. You live in a paradise.

Viewing your pictures of Areca vestiaria a question comes to my mind: is this species worth trying to grow as an indoor plant? Over here A. tiandra is sometimes sold and with good care it can flourish even indoors taken outdoors during our summers.

Cheers, Jan

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Thanks for the memory Jeff! I had not seen this photo in quite awhile. I remember having to pick my chin up off the ground when we stumbled upon that forest. That will forever be engraved in my memory bank.

I planted one in the ground in Aug. We've had a few cold snaps in the thirties and the plant looks completely unscathed. I am holding out hope for this one.

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Randy, I wish the Herrero's would get into the seed exporting business. They certainly have enough stock!

Jan, thanks for the nice words. Attending the Biennial was a great experience and a lot of fun!

I have never tried growing A. vestiaria as an indoor plant, but there are others here who do grow a lot of inside palms, maybe someone has some experience?

Bren, I agree, that was a memorable day of the Biennial!

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My eyes can't get enough of this palm, and I've never seen one in person... except for the two 1-gallon versions currently in my garage.

MORE PHOTOS!

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Terry, I have lots of Areca vestiaria photos. Here are some of them.

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They seem to range in color from pale orange to dark orange.

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DSC_0180.jpg

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Hi Jeff,

I´m very impressed by your Areca vestiaria photos.Since they seem to grow so well in Costa Rica, why dont we see any of them in our gardens here in the Pacifico Sur?At least I dont find them....I see all kinds of palms, but A.vestiaria...no trace.

Is it because people here already have the Cyrtostachys renda with these red colors?

Any way... I cant find the address of Mr.Herreo in the phone book... could you tell me where this palm-forest is located?

Pura vida!

(I will be there in Manuel Antonio for the meeting on jan 10)

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Great pictures, and one of my favorite palms. Wish mine looked that good. I started a few from seed several years ago but, of course, all the maroon-leaved ones died. :angry:

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You live in paradise Jeff. I think I could adjust to the humidity.

Here's one of my little dudes. I brought mine inside last night, as I have yet to really drop below 40F this year. I don't even want to know how slow these are in SoCal.

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Hi Jeff,

I´m very impressed by your Areca vestiaria photos.Since they seem to grow so well in Costa Rica, why dont we see any of them in our gardens here in the Pacifico Sur?At least I dont find them....I see all kinds of palms, but A.vestiaria...no trace.

Is it because people here already have the Cyrtostachys renda with these red colors?

Any way... I cant find the address of Mr.Herreo in the phone book... could you tell me where this palm-forest is located?

Pura vida!

(I will be there in Manuel Antonio for the meeting on jan 10)

Hi Jose Maria,

I'm not sure why they are not more widely used in Costa Rica, I've only seen them at Herrero's and at a Botanical Garden near Puerto Viejo. Although the last time I was in Escazú, a nursery (Exotica) had some nice large clumps of Areca vestiaria for sale. Cyrtostachys renda are a dime a dozen, but for some reason most nurseries do not carry A. vestiaria.

You can contact Marco here on PalmTalk, send a PM to MAHE. I will PM you with more info.

I'm glad you are coming to the meeting! I look forward to meeting you. :)

Pura vida!

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Tom, I have problems with the red ones here too. I only have one left out of three. It's finally gaining some size and I think this one is going to make it. For some reason the red ones just die on me. Maybe the soil stays too wet in the pots? I really don't know. The orange ones seem easier for me to grow.

Terry, it looks like you have one of the red ones. I had one in the ground in Tampa for 3 or 4 years. It would always open a severely stunted frond every Spring and then resume normal growth and take most of the Summer to fully recover. It did better than I had expected it to do. Do you plan on planting yours outside?

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Mine get to live in pots and come inside on nights like tonight. It's supposed to hit 34-36F. I'm not sure even the perfect microclimate would work here.

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Great palm to do a topic on! Thanks for starting it, John. Great photos Jeff and BGL!

The palmpedia article is heplfull, too. I don't care if it's the orange or maroon form, I can't get enough of this palm! It's like a super model or a Picasso painting: enticing!

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Great photos Jeff and Bill.

Jeff, that forrest of A vestiaraias is unreal. I can't even imagine having those growing like that with in short distance from me let alone my yard. How far away from them are you located?

Bo, Wow the red on your vestiaraias rivals the color on C rendas. Thanks for posting the pics.

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Great photos Jeff and Bill.

Jeff, that forrest of A vestiaraias is unreal. I can't even imagine having those growing like that with in short distance from me let alone my yard. How far away from them are you located?

Bo, Wow the red on your vestiaraias rivals the color on C rendas. Thanks for posting the pics.

Hi Don, they are located near San Jose (a three hour drive from me). I haven't seen any large ones here in Manuel Antonio, but I'm fixin to change that!

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A few more photos:

1 - a group of 5G maroon A. vestiaria

2 - two 1G seedlings, from the VERY same seedbatch. The maroon one will always open up with maroon fronds (and they keep the color for a LONG time), and the other one will always open up with green fronds.

3 - three of the "green ones"

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Great photos Jeff and Bill.

Jeff, that forrest of A vestiaraias is unreal. I can't even imagine having those growing like that with in short distance from me let alone my yard. How far away from them are you located?

Bo, Wow the red on your vestiaraias rivals the color on C rendas. Thanks for posting the pics.

Hi Don, they are located near San Jose (a three hour drive from me). I haven't seen any large ones here in Manuel Antonio, but I'm fixin to change that!

"Do You Know the Way to San José" is a song etched into my earliest memory. I can see why now! The forest shots are enchanting.

So I don't have to specifically go looking for a maroon leaf variation if I grow enough of them. That's even more fun.

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Love these palms, but have the worst time keeping them happy and alive. I use well drained soil, keep it moist..but not wet, and plant in very indirect light, if not mostly shade inside the house and still the fronds slowly dry up and plant degrades and dies.

Currently have a double, about 20 inches tall in shelf above a bath tub where it's 60% humidity..at least and still fronds dry up.

Any secret to keeping them happy? BTW, I have a Red Sealing Wax seedling in a 4 inch pot right next to it doing just fine....

Scott/Omaha

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Scott, welcome. Your Arecas need very high humidity to grow well - 60% is probably not enough, particularly indoors during winter. Most homes have central heat and are way too dry in winter. Lower humidity is favorable to red spider mites so check the palms carefully. You could try setting the pot on rocks in a tray of water. Also mist them several times a day. Unfortunately, keeping tropical palms alive over winter in a heated house is an uphill battle.

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One palm, two forms, orange and maroon.

And then theres Areca sp Halmahera, not a vesti but sure looks nice

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Never heard of this one but I like it!

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I know this is an old post. How long typically does it take to germinate one 

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They take around a month or 2 with good heat.

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1 hour ago, palmad Merc said:

They take around a month or 2 with good heat.

Good heat around 90f?

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Rob, I was thinking only yesterday about Bo's comment regarding Areca vestiaria being 'one and the same', as I now have a few sprouts that are distinctly red or green spiked.

The spike seems to prefer to grow straight out the end of the seed (unlike so many adjacent germinators where it emerges at right angles). For the size of the seed I think they are relatively slow growing.

I've also heeded the comments about removing the fibres, as they're long and densely packed over the embryo pore. Not much air gets in between the fibres, which hold the moisture almost too well.

 

 

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1 hour ago, John in Andalucia said:

Rob, I was thinking only yesterday about Bo's comment regarding Areca vestiaria being 'one and the same', as I now have a few sprouts that are distinctly red or green spiked.

The spike seems to prefer to grow straight out the end of the seed (unlike so many adjacent germinators where it emerges at right angles). For the size of the seed I think they are relatively slow growing.

I've also heeded the comments about removing the fibres, as they're long and densely packed over the embryo pore. Not much air gets in between the fibres, which hold the moisture almost too well.

 

 

20180711_173549.jpg

Ok noted. Seedman has some rarely come In stock for the first time in months so I bought some and more lipstick palm as well. We will see how it goes. Should have the seeds in a week 

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So remove the fibres to help moisture and oxygen get to th seed? I did that with adonidia seeds a few months ago and they rotted 

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1 hour ago, Rickybobby said:

So remove the fibres to help moisture and oxygen get to th seed? I did that with adonidia seeds a few months ago and they rotted 

Almost. Oxygen yes, but the fibres can trap too much moisture if you mix is overly damp. If the seeds are less than 100% fresh they'll rot in this case. You want a really friable soil mix with just a hint of moisture, then with the fibres removed, even the really late sprouting seeds will have a good chance. 

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