Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Removing boots from queen palm trunk

10 posts in this topic

Howdy. I usually wait until the boots are about to fall off by themselves before pulling them off cleanly, usually with almost no force. However, some of my queen palms have boots that have stayed on very low that won't come off with even a forceful pull. The issue is that some of the boots ABOVE the ones that won't come off have already come off by themselves. So it looks really odd to have random stragglers stuck on that should have been gone long ago. I just want things to be at an even level up to the point where they are coming off naturally, not to like skin the tree prematurely. When I've tried forcing them off too much I've torn into the tree a little and I'm sure this is not a good idea, since buggies and pathogens could get in this way. So I'm curious to know a good technique for cutting off or removing boots without just ripping them off. I could cut or hacksaw them off as close as possible to where they connect, but then there would still be excess hanging off the trunk I think. I'm sure there must be a better way.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know some people use a really sharp utility knife razor. They do this to skin Trachycarpus to give a more clean look by removing all the fiber.

I would guess you cut carefully along the base of the frond boot where the fibers attach to the trunk.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I know some people use a really sharp utility knife razor. They do this to skin Trachycarpus to give a more clean look by removing all the fiber.

I would guess you cut carefully along the base of the frond boot where the fibers attach to the trunk.

I'd be scared of cutting into the trunk doing it that way, but maybe it would work if the knife was really sharp so one didn't have to use much force.

BTW, anyone know why some queens I have clean themselves up very high, while others hang onto the boots for dear life? I have trees of equal height one next to the other and they might have a discrepancy of like 10 feet of ringed trunk.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a pruning saw, gently, gently.

Saw - yank; saw - yank, etc.

Eventually they come off.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Normally, a leaf base that won't "give in" is split (in an up & down direction) because the trunk has expanded in diameter since that leaf was attached. The idea is to use pruning scissors to completely split the leaf base from top to bottom--now you have two (half) leaf bases. You can usually then pull them back, and cut the fibers at the base with your scissors. This keeps the trunk "wound free". Otherwise you'll begin peeling away the trunk. They can be persistant at times...

Bret

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, that's true. Many of the persistent ones lower down are split due to trunk growth and they are more brittle having been exposed to the elements for many years. They just for whatever reason want to stay attached. I still would love to hear an explanation as to why some trees don't let go and some are happy to keep dropping the boots and self clean pretty rapidly.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't have an answer for that one. I've oftened wondered the same about Washingtonias. They get to a certain height, and all of the sudden become self-pruning. Usually with a bit of help from a stiff breeze...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you ever de-boot?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boots from a queen (palm) make great kindling for a huge bonfire, or a rip-roarin' barbeque, or ?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always used a sawzall and then pruning sheers and kitchen scissors

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • Virginia Beach Sabal Palmettos and Why They Look Bad
      By PalmTreeDude
      If you look at Virginia Beach when it comes to Sabal palmettos and you think "those things are going to die." The problem with those palms is not the fact that it is too cold for them but it is the fact that they are not planted well or established. I seen how they plant them and they simply slap it in a hole and fill it with dirt and walk away. They are not planted well. Then they wrap them with a plastic material at the top. Many die. I bet they would do better if they were planted as smaller trees and given years to grow and properly establish. I have looked around neighborhoods about 0.5 miles inland from the ocean and the Sabal palmettos are MASSIVE and thriving.    Many people say they buy them locally grown (unlike the ones by the beach and board walk) so they don't get shocked from the colder winters from being used to Florida weather. I have seen 50ft Sabal palmettos with full foltalige in people's yards. These palms are more cold Hardy then you think and once they are established they take off. I have seen huge unprotected ones in zone 7b Virginia before too. If anyone has pictures of some Sabal palmettos in Virginia Beach please post them! Thanks for reading.
    • 7 Gal. Windmill Palm on Zone 7a/7b Boarder Questions
      By PalmTreeDude
      I have a 7 Gal. Windmill Palm I will be planting this weekend and I am on the border of zone 7a/7b. Do you think it will need protection once established? 
    • Washingtonia Filifera Palm Sprouts?
      By PalmTreeDude
      So I planted these California Fan Palm (Washingtonia Filifera) seeds in the little bin thingy 1 week ago and today the seed is coming up, it is does not look like a blade of grass, it looks like a comman leafed plant seed. Is this normal? And yes, I checked to make sure the seeds were palm seeds and they were.
       
       


    • Self pollenation.
      By Las Palmas Norte
      On rare occasions, sometimes after decades,  Trachycarpus fortunei  will send both male and female inflorescence, essentially cloning itself. Do any other palms exhibit this trait?
    • Sun Hardy Palms in the Balboa Park Succulent Garden
      By Sabal Steve
      I'm not sure that many know of this spot, but it is definitely worth a look.  I'm sure that there's a half dozen species in this area that I didn't even get a picture of.  These are BIG palms, reaching maturity in many cases.  The park is on the East side of Park Blvd, directly on the other side of Park from the Natural History Museum.  A bridge crosses over Park blvd.
       
      Phoenix sylvesteris (I think), Phoenix dactyliferia, Brahea "Super Silver", Brahea aculeata

       
      Phoenix dactyliferia trunk
       

       
      Phoenix sylvesteris trunk
       

       
      Sabal sp. with Phoenix dactyliferia in the foreground
       

       
      Sabal sp.
       

       
      Sabal sp.
       

       

       
      Bismarckia nobilis trunk
       

       
      Brahea "Super Silver", Brahea aculeata

       
      Brahea brandegeei
       

       
      Brahea armata
       


       
      Brahea sp.
       

       
      Hyphaene sp.

       
      Mudflow
       

       
      Chamaerops humilis