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Removing boots from queen palm trunk

10 posts in this topic

Howdy. I usually wait until the boots are about to fall off by themselves before pulling them off cleanly, usually with almost no force. However, some of my queen palms have boots that have stayed on very low that won't come off with even a forceful pull. The issue is that some of the boots ABOVE the ones that won't come off have already come off by themselves. So it looks really odd to have random stragglers stuck on that should have been gone long ago. I just want things to be at an even level up to the point where they are coming off naturally, not to like skin the tree prematurely. When I've tried forcing them off too much I've torn into the tree a little and I'm sure this is not a good idea, since buggies and pathogens could get in this way. So I'm curious to know a good technique for cutting off or removing boots without just ripping them off. I could cut or hacksaw them off as close as possible to where they connect, but then there would still be excess hanging off the trunk I think. I'm sure there must be a better way.

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I know some people use a really sharp utility knife razor. They do this to skin Trachycarpus to give a more clean look by removing all the fiber.

I would guess you cut carefully along the base of the frond boot where the fibers attach to the trunk.

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I know some people use a really sharp utility knife razor. They do this to skin Trachycarpus to give a more clean look by removing all the fiber.

I would guess you cut carefully along the base of the frond boot where the fibers attach to the trunk.

I'd be scared of cutting into the trunk doing it that way, but maybe it would work if the knife was really sharp so one didn't have to use much force.

BTW, anyone know why some queens I have clean themselves up very high, while others hang onto the boots for dear life? I have trees of equal height one next to the other and they might have a discrepancy of like 10 feet of ringed trunk.

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I use a pruning saw, gently, gently.

Saw - yank; saw - yank, etc.

Eventually they come off.

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Normally, a leaf base that won't "give in" is split (in an up & down direction) because the trunk has expanded in diameter since that leaf was attached. The idea is to use pruning scissors to completely split the leaf base from top to bottom--now you have two (half) leaf bases. You can usually then pull them back, and cut the fibers at the base with your scissors. This keeps the trunk "wound free". Otherwise you'll begin peeling away the trunk. They can be persistant at times...

Bret

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Yes, that's true. Many of the persistent ones lower down are split due to trunk growth and they are more brittle having been exposed to the elements for many years. They just for whatever reason want to stay attached. I still would love to hear an explanation as to why some trees don't let go and some are happy to keep dropping the boots and self clean pretty rapidly.

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Don't have an answer for that one. I've oftened wondered the same about Washingtonias. They get to a certain height, and all of the sudden become self-pruning. Usually with a bit of help from a stiff breeze...

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Did you ever de-boot?

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Boots from a queen (palm) make great kindling for a huge bonfire, or a rip-roarin' barbeque, or ?

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I've always used a sawzall and then pruning sheers and kitchen scissors

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