Beccariophonenix alfredii

66 posts in this topic

Just bought 1 gallon size. How tall?????????? Fast???????????????? Part sun?????????????

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Steve,

Compared to the others B.alfredii comes from the rainforest but

there's no reason why it won't handle the same conditions as the

other two 'sp' it's not as slow as B.madagascariensis, but is a

steady grower much like like the window's form.

Regards Mikey

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Steve,

Compared to the others B.alfredii comes from the rainforest but

there's no reason why it won't handle the same conditions as the

other two 'sp' it's not as slow as B.madagascariensis, but is a

steady grower much like like the window's form.

Regards Mikey

Thanks for the info

STeve

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mikey,

I'm not sure if you just mistyped, but I read the whole article on the desription of Beccariophoenix alfredii, and it definitely does not come from the rainforest. It's from the high plateau and grows in a river valley where it is the only tall plant around. It makes it's own forests in the area basically, but the area is seasonally dry I'm pretty sure, and the plants tap into the water around the edges of the river. I have several that I've grown from germinated seeds and I'm pretty sure they're faster than the 'no windows' form. Also, I took them out of the greenhouse directly into an area that gets a couple hours of direct sun and they didn't burn at all (they're 1-2 gallong sized plants, leaves just splitting to bifid from straps). So I'm pretty certain they will thrive in full sun from a pretty young age.

Size wise they will get about as big as a coconut and look about like one too. So far mine seem like pretty fast growers. I haven't grown 'no windows' but I would guess that Alfredii is faster than that.

Matt

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I put a strap leafer (5 leaves) straight in the ground at my place about 1 year ago. It has pushed two leaves since then and a little grith. It probably would have done better staying in a pot for another year or so, but I am impatient. Hopefully it is just throwing down some serious roots and will take off soon. So for me, it has been slow so far but made it through the winter with 27F and light frost. Mine gets full to filtered sun.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Matt is correct, they come from the high plateau, seasonally cool, similar location and conditions to Dypsis Decipians. I have a pretty good size one in full blazing hot and dry sun and it grows quickly. I think this will be our California Coconut of the future.

Gary

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have 2 B. alfredii, 5 strap leaves, in deep liners. I thought with my cool nights they would grow here, but so far they are very slow, and the emerging fronds have brown stripes on them. They came from a green house and were exposed to a heat wave a couple of weeks ago, but they are growing under lathe and don't appear to have burned. I'm surprised what a light texture they have. The small ones seem very delicate. Maybe I need to try a larger size.

Dick

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Matt is correct, they come from the high plateau, seasonally cool, similar location and conditions to Dypsis Decipians. I have a pretty good size one in full blazing hot and dry sun and it grows quickly. I think this will be our California Coconut of the future.

Gary

Hi Gary,

Do you have a pic handy, I'd like to see what they look like when they get larger.

Matt

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A google search for this doesn't turn up much. But if it's like others such as the Beccariophoenix madagascariensis I'll bet it's a beauty.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys, sounds like a winner. I think I'll put it out where it will get sun. Lucky here it is hot, w/little rain, but the air is humid.

Wai`anae Steve

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mikey,

I'm not sure if you just mistyped, but I read the whole article on the desription of Beccariophoenix alfredii, and it definitely does not come from the rainforest. It's from the high plateau and grows in a river valley where it is the only tall plant around. It makes it's own forests in the area basically, but the area is seasonally dry I'm pretty sure, and the plants tap into the water around the edges of the river. I have several that I've grown from germinated seeds and I'm pretty sure they're faster than the 'no windows' form. Also, I took them out of the greenhouse directly into an area that gets a couple hours of direct sun and they didn't burn at all (they're 1-2 gallong sized plants, leaves just splitting to bifid from straps). So I'm pretty certain they will thrive in full sun from a pretty young age.

Size wise they will get about as big as a coconut and look about like one too. So far mine seem like pretty fast growers. I haven't grown 'no windows' but I would guess that Alfredii is faster than that.

Matt

Rainforest ????? What ? There's no forest for miles.

This is a full sun palm and has prove to with stand the sun at an early age here in south Florida. Good call Matt.

Jeff

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve,

I'm convinced B. alfredii is going to be a real winner at your location! :)

Bo-Göran

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Waykoolplantz who lives several miles inland from the ocean in Hollywood Florida has several large Beccariophoenix with huge crowns and several feet of woody trunks. They are gorgeous and some are growing near water, so they much have their feet in water.

Dick

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive had seedlings sitting outside in full sun and now they have had several frosts and look fine. This seems (at the moment) to me, to be a palm that will tolerat nearly anything. Some in a greenhouse I have expereinced temps over 40°C for many days over summer. I have also planted seedlings in ground and they are doing fine, hopefully they will handle the huge amount of rain we are having down here at the moment.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Waykoolplantz who lives several miles inland from the ocean in Hollywood Florida has several large Beccariophoenix with huge crowns and several feet of woody trunks. They are gorgeous and some are growing near water, so they much have their feet in water.

Dick

Dick,

Mike does have some very large ones down by the water. But, their the Becc.mad. (or other ?) with the windows. Not B. alfredii. But he does have them planted close by.

Jeff

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never really thought much about trying this palm, B. alfredii, but now that I know more about it think I'll try get one for the garden. Good luck with yours Steve.

Al in Kona

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To Matt in SD, or any other ID specialists --- How do you tell them apart???

If I put one of my 5 gal. B. mads (no windows) next to a 5 gal. B. alf, I can't tell the difference. Maybe I don't have a true B. alf???

Is there any difference?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dean, I will post up a pic of my larger plant soon, but they hold their leaves in a nice arch horizontal and lower, look like coconut palms. The No Windows variety are like feather dusters holding the leaves more vertical.

Gary

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I smell an idea for a group planting! B. mad, B. alfred, B. sp. windows. You may all steal my idea.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Guys,

I forgot to put open, in front of rainforest, I have habitat photos that I’m trying to find (Matt your right with the location area) and all three look just like Coconuts when there big. Although this one looks like the southern form it grows just as fast as the windows form.

Regards Mikey

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here you go...

Copyright 'Palms'

post-42-1217543527_thumb.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a un-named 'sp' of Ravenea (this is not glauca) that grows with B.alfredii in habitat

in the same area, Jeff is this not a open rainforest area (good to hear your planting things

in the full sun now) :) I'm still looking for pictures of B. alfredii from the orginal collection.

Regards Mikey.

post-657-1217543670_thumb.jpg

Edited by calyptrocalyx&licuala freck
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my container area, side by side, one gal. sized B. alfredii are doing better than B. windows in full south Texas sun and heat. We will see what happens in the long run.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here you go...

Copyright 'Palms'

post-42-1217543527_thumb.jpg

:drool: :drool: :drool: :drool: :drool:

Wow, fantastic looking adults, hope they do well for me.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here some co-ordinates for those of you who use Google Earth:

20 12' 32.1" S, 46 30' 04.3" E

Thanks to Brod (FM) gave these to me a while ago.

Daryl

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got several of the Beccariophoenix sp. "Southern Form" from Floribunda (I believe). These are mainly non-windows and the new leaves go mostly pinnate quickly (leaflets are not fully pinnate, but nor are they bifid; there are sometimes one or two windows in the leaf). Is this a fourth Beccariophoenix species, or is it synonymous with either B. alfredii or B. madagascariensis (assuming the real B. madagascariensis is not the windowpane form). Thanks in advance.

Jason

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dean, here is my small B. Alfredii (2 Feet).

Gary

DSC_2159.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here's a un-named 'sp' of Ravenea (this is not glauca) that grows with B.alfredii in habitat

in the same area, Jeff is this not a open rainforest area (good to hear your planting things

in the full sun now) :) I'm still looking for pictures of B. alfredii from the orginal collection.

Regards Mikey.

post-42-1217543527_thumb.jpg

If that is OPEN rainforest, then So Cal isn't a desert, it also is an OPEN rainforest! :winkie::lol:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dean, here is my small B. Alfredii (2 Feet).

Thanks for the pic Gary. I think you guys are right. That is going to do very well in SoCal.

But I still have a hard time seeing the difference between the two species at that size. If what you say is true about the differences when they are adults, then one could differentiate when older. But how would you know which variety you would be looking at when that size?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dean,

I saw a few B mad and B alfredii at Len's place the other night. He has some 4 footers of both types and they are very slightly different looking. Like Gary said, B madagscariensis is more upright and alredii more spreading leaflets. The color of the fibers is a bit lighter on alfredii I think (they are at least a different shade), and the fiber thickness and pattern was a bit different. I think alfredii also has a more yellowish petiole but not sure if this would hold from one individual to another. Oh yeah, the most obvious difference I could see was in the terminal leaflets. B alfredii has terminal leaflets that are about as long as the almost terminal leaflets and they go out at about the same angle as the others. This makes it so that if you look at the leaf from below or above, there is a big gap at the end where there are not leaflets. B madagscariensis had more normal terminal leaflet structure where they are shorter than the previous ones and point more straightforward (no gap at the end). I would actually say this terminal leaflet difference would be the only way to tell them apart without having two side by side. There was only one of each plant, so I can't say for sure this is a general trend, but it was pretty obvious on these two plants and seemed like a true structural feature.

And Mike, there are habitat photos all over the article in Palms with the description of B alfredii. I can't imagine there could possibly be a more reliable source for info. They all look like the photos above, more like a dry savannah with a creek running through. Maybe you're confusing the location of the true B madagascariensis (which I think is the "southern form") which is from a more rainforest environment?

Matt

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dean- If its any help, from a small size (1-5 gal) the only difference I can pick out of the Alfredii and no windows is the Alfedii seems to have the "yellow part" be more of a "whitish creamy yellow" versus more of a "normal yellow" for the N.W. I have seen it on different Alfedii in different area's so it seems to not be environment.

I have a little bit larger stretched one than Gary that needs potting up. I'll try to post a pic post pot-up. (say that 3 times fast!)

Bill

PS- Matt types much faster than I do.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Guys

These photo’s where taken while Joro was up there getting type specimens

For the naming of this ‘sp’ perharps J.D can come on and confirm this. the

Picture Daryl has posted would be from another location, still looking for the

photo from the first collection, got lots of photo’s and having

Problems finding it but will show it soon.

Cheers Mikey.

Edited by calyptrocalyx&licuala freck
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, Ready for a Google Earth journey? Ever since Palms came out with the co-ords I've had them saved to my computer and have wandered through the valleys of this area searching out individual Beccariophoenix alfredi and there are lots of them. But as you move away from these few valleys the number backs off to none.

post-63-1217553363_thumb.jpg

post-63-1217553393_thumb.jpg

post-63-1217553406_thumb.jpg

post-63-1217553417_thumb.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Angled back a bit you can see the angle on the land itself. Deep ravines with water running down them. The Beccariophoenix are never far from water and in the flood season these ravines would roar with water for a while. But these are the only palms present, with almost no tree cover anywhere else, so it's very easy to spot them.

Best regards

Tyrone

post-63-1217553468_thumb.jpg

post-63-1217553493_thumb.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Daryl/Tyrone,

Thanks for the great pictures of these showing their natural setting out in the open.

Jeff

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I often wonder if the area where that photo was taken was once forest of some kind, and that it has been cleared by man/fire and the palms are just remnants.

Daryl

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well after all the conversation on this palm I decided to plant it first from the 16 just purchased. Pictures follow:

1-All the "junk" piled around that use to grow where the palm is now..

BeccariophoenixalfrediiJuly08a.jpg

2-the palm (that's a regulation basket ball)

BeccariophoenixalfrediiJuly08b.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keep it deeply watered through the warm weather and away it should fly. :)

Best regards

Tyrone

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I smell an idea for a group planting! B. mad, B. alfred, B. sp. windows. You may all steal my idea.

We have a group planting of B. windows...& no windows (coastal form) already...my alfredii is @ 6' tall and will be joining the group soon

PlantzNyard012-1.jpg

Alfred is enjoying life in the screen enclosure with other well respected criminals

PlantzNyard004-1.jpg

PlantzNyard003-2.jpg

detail

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heres Alfred surrounded by his cronies

PlantzNyard008-1.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now